Full page view
HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A man of means (Wilfred Lucas) goes out for the evening, leaving his wife (Dorothy Bernard) at home alone. The next scene shows him meeting an actress (Vivian Prescott) outside a stage door; several other clandestine meetings are shown. The actress sends the husband a note at home which he accidentally drops, and his wife learns of the affair. A male friend (Charles West) suggests that he escort the wife to the same restaurant, and the two couples are shown at the restaurant, each aware that the other is there. The leave separately. The husband realizes that the love of his wife means a great deal to him, so he goes home and begs her forgiveness. The picture ends with their embrace.”
       The 7 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “The story of a woman who husband became infatuated with an actress, and the latter encouraged his attentions under the impression that he was single. The wife follows them to a restaurant in company with a friend and acts the part of an abandon to show her husband his folly. Her ruse is successful and she wins him back.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 31 Dec 1910 Film Index billed the story in Winning Back His Love as “One Way of Curing an Indifferent Husband.” It stated that the film was released on 29 Dec 1910, though other sources listed 26 Dec ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A man of means (Wilfred Lucas) goes out for the evening, leaving his wife (Dorothy Bernard) at home alone. The next scene shows him meeting an actress (Vivian Prescott) outside a stage door; several other clandestine meetings are shown. The actress sends the husband a note at home which he accidentally drops, and his wife learns of the affair. A male friend (Charles West) suggests that he escort the wife to the same restaurant, and the two couples are shown at the restaurant, each aware that the other is there. The leave separately. The husband realizes that the love of his wife means a great deal to him, so he goes home and begs her forgiveness. The picture ends with their embrace.”
       The 7 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “The story of a woman who husband became infatuated with an actress, and the latter encouraged his attentions under the impression that he was single. The wife follows them to a restaurant in company with a friend and acts the part of an abandon to show her husband his folly. Her ruse is successful and she wins him back.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 31 Dec 1910 Film Index billed the story in Winning Back His Love as “One Way of Curing an Indifferent Husband.” It stated that the film was released on 29 Dec 1910, though other sources listed 26 Dec 1910. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 259.
BPL
pp. 134-135.
EMP
p. 368.
Film Index
31 Dec 1910
p. 24.
LCMP
p. 68, column 2.
LCPP
p. 228.
Moving Picture News
31 Dec 1910
p. 19tl.
Moving Picture World
31 Dec 1910
p. 1546ts, 1549tl.
Moving Picture World
7 Jan 1911
p. 34tr.
The Daily Worker
p. 100.
Treasures from the Film Archives
p. 277.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on Winning Back Her Love by A. Donnelly.
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 December 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1910
Copyright Number:
J149495
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
994
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Mrs. Wallace is possessed of a disturbing premonition that her husband’s love is waning, and truth to say her fears are well grounded, for although she doesn’t know of anything conclusively, still there is a reason, and that reason is Vera Blair, a show girl, who, believing Frederick Wallace to be a single man, is attracted by him and successfully fascinates him. He has spent several evenings in her company and now finds her irresistible. Hence, when he receives a note asking him to accompany her to a little after-the-show supper, he hastens to comply. This note falls into the hands of the wife, who is beside herself with grief, when Bob Martin, a friend of the family, appears. Upon learning the cause of her woe, he suggests a plan to cure Fred of his folly. This remedy is to pay him back in his own coin, to wit: visit the café in his company and pretend a reckless abandon, thereby putting the ‘shoe on the other foot.’ Repugnant as this procedure is to her, she is induced to consent as it will mean one thing or the other decisively. Fred has arrived at the stage door and meeting the girl, he is just leaving for the café when the wife and friend appear in the distance. They follow and secure the adjoining private booth to that occupied by Fred and the girl. It isn’t long before Fred hears the clink of glasses and a hilarious laugh that is unmistakably his wife’s. Stealthily drawing the curtain dividing the booths aside, the sight that greets him freezes his blood, for there is his wife, with an empty wine glass in ... +


“Mrs. Wallace is possessed of a disturbing premonition that her husband’s love is waning, and truth to say her fears are well grounded, for although she doesn’t know of anything conclusively, still there is a reason, and that reason is Vera Blair, a show girl, who, believing Frederick Wallace to be a single man, is attracted by him and successfully fascinates him. He has spent several evenings in her company and now finds her irresistible. Hence, when he receives a note asking him to accompany her to a little after-the-show supper, he hastens to comply. This note falls into the hands of the wife, who is beside herself with grief, when Bob Martin, a friend of the family, appears. Upon learning the cause of her woe, he suggests a plan to cure Fred of his folly. This remedy is to pay him back in his own coin, to wit: visit the café in his company and pretend a reckless abandon, thereby putting the ‘shoe on the other foot.’ Repugnant as this procedure is to her, she is induced to consent as it will mean one thing or the other decisively. Fred has arrived at the stage door and meeting the girl, he is just leaving for the café when the wife and friend appear in the distance. They follow and secure the adjoining private booth to that occupied by Fred and the girl. It isn’t long before Fred hears the clink of glasses and a hilarious laugh that is unmistakably his wife’s. Stealthily drawing the curtain dividing the booths aside, the sight that greets him freezes his blood, for there is his wife, with an empty wine glass in her hand, apparently in a state of mild intoxication, accompanied by their dearest friend. In an instant he is towering with rage. His wife in such a place drinking with his friend, outrageous! Ah! but he doesn’t yet appreciate the enormity of his own fault. Getting the girl into another room by subterfuge, he bursts in upon what he deems the guilty pair. Urged by the friend, the wife continues to play her part, though her heart is well near breaking, and almost rebels. At this point the girl returns for her gloves which she dropped and learns now that he is a married man. She scorns him with even more vehemence than his wife appears to do, and departs, the wife leaving at the same time. Left alone, he now realizes his profligacy and the value of his wife’s love, which he imagines he has lost. As he sits there alone, he is in the depths of desperation when he espies on the table a water glass filled with wine—it is now clear to him. His wife did not drink, but poured the wine into this glass and pretended intoxication to show him the error of his way, which he now sees only too clearly. What a wretch he has been. What a jewel she is to suffer indignity for his sake. Jumping up from the table, he rushes home with a firm purpose of amendment, bestowing upon her the love and attention she hungered for.”—31 Dec 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.