A Woman's Wit (1910)

Western, Adventure | 15 October 1910

Director:

Joseph A. Golden

Production Company:

The Powers Co.
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HISTORY

The 29 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “One more girl is captured by bandits and carried away to their rendezvous. She is quick-witted enough to escape by bringing her lover and the sheriff to the cave through sending her horse with a message. Just why bandits should permit a prisoner to perform such an interesting operation isn’t entirely clear. But according to the picture it is done, and the bandits are captured and the girl restored to her lover. The reasons why pictures of this type belong to the past have been pointed out before. We cannot have too few films which depend upon abducting girls for their interest.”
       In 1909, P. A. “Pat” Powers opened the Powers Company in a large, renovated building at 241st Street and Richardson Avenue in the Wakefield section of the Bronx, NY. He released the first of more than 120 Powers films in early Nov 1909. Actresses Pearl White and Juliet Shelby, later known as Mary Miles Minter, made their first films for Powers. The company later became part of the new Universal ... More Less

The 29 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “One more girl is captured by bandits and carried away to their rendezvous. She is quick-witted enough to escape by bringing her lover and the sheriff to the cave through sending her horse with a message. Just why bandits should permit a prisoner to perform such an interesting operation isn’t entirely clear. But according to the picture it is done, and the bandits are captured and the girl restored to her lover. The reasons why pictures of this type belong to the past have been pointed out before. We cannot have too few films which depend upon abducting girls for their interest.”
       In 1909, P. A. “Pat” Powers opened the Powers Company in a large, renovated building at 241st Street and Richardson Avenue in the Wakefield section of the Bronx, NY. He released the first of more than 120 Powers films in early Nov 1909. Actresses Pearl White and Juliet Shelby, later known as Mary Miles Minter, made their first films for Powers. The company later became part of the new Universal Pictures. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Moving Picture News
15 Oct 1910
p. 18tl, 20tl[EMP].
Moving Picture News
29 Oct 1910
p. 15tr.
Moving Picture News
5 Nov 1910
p. 13tr.
Moving Picture World
23 Apr 1910
p. 636-637.
Moving Picture World
15 Oct 1910
p. 851ta, 892ts, 894tl.
Moving Picture World
29 Oct 1910
p. 998tr.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1910
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
975
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Judge Brown, of Tonah Par, New Mexico, is threatened with death by some bandits unless he releases one of their pals. The Judge’s daughter, Grace, goes out riding with her lover, Arthur Bray. Her horse runs away and she falls into the hands of the bandits and is taken to their cave. Diaz, the chief bandit, sends word to the judge that he will release his daughter when the judge releases Mandez. Grace flatters the bandit chief by making a portrait of him. She writes a message on the bottom of the picture telling of her whereabouts and tears this part off. Later she persuades the bandit to let her take a walk. She takes the message in her handkerchief to the horse and sends the horse galloping toward her home. Her lover and the sheriff's man find the horse and the message and come to the rescue. A thrilling and dramatic scene follows and Grace is rescued.”—15 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World ... +


“Judge Brown, of Tonah Par, New Mexico, is threatened with death by some bandits unless he releases one of their pals. The Judge’s daughter, Grace, goes out riding with her lover, Arthur Bray. Her horse runs away and she falls into the hands of the bandits and is taken to their cave. Diaz, the chief bandit, sends word to the judge that he will release his daughter when the judge releases Mandez. Grace flatters the bandit chief by making a portrait of him. She writes a message on the bottom of the picture telling of her whereabouts and tears this part off. Later she persuades the bandit to let her take a walk. She takes the message in her handkerchief to the horse and sends the horse galloping toward her home. Her lover and the sheriff's man find the horse and the message and come to the rescue. A thrilling and dramatic scene follows and Grace is rescued.”—15 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.