Shine on Harvest Moon (1938)

55 mins | Western | 23 December 1938

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HISTORY

The onscreen credit for Lulu Belle and Scotty reads: "Lulu Belle and Scotty, in their first appearance direct from station "The Prairie Farmer" W.L.S. "National Barn Dance." The song "Shine On Harvest Moon," originally written in 1908, was not given screen credit. According to a news item in HR , this was Charles Ford's last film for Republic after he decided to leave the studio to become an independent producer. According to modern sources, the film was shot partially on location at Vasquez Rocks in Southern California, and additional cast members include David Sharpe and Roy Rogers' horse, ... More Less

The onscreen credit for Lulu Belle and Scotty reads: "Lulu Belle and Scotty, in their first appearance direct from station "The Prairie Farmer" W.L.S. "National Barn Dance." The song "Shine On Harvest Moon," originally written in 1908, was not given screen credit. According to a news item in HR , this was Charles Ford's last film for Republic after he decided to leave the studio to become an independent producer. According to modern sources, the film was shot partially on location at Vasquez Rocks in Southern California, and additional cast members include David Sharpe and Roy Rogers' horse, "Trigger." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 May 1939.
---
Daily Variety
10 Dec 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Dec 38
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 38
p. 3, 6
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 39
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 38
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 38
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
3 Dec 38
p. 21.
Variety
15 Feb 39
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Headin' for the Open Plain," words and music by Eddie Cherkose and Walter Kent
"Let Me Build a Cabin," words and music by Jack Natteford, Raoul Kraushaar and Eddie Cherkose
"The Man in the Moon Is a Cowhand," words and music by Roy Rogers
+
SONGS
"Headin' for the Open Plain," words and music by Eddie Cherkose and Walter Kent
"Let Me Build a Cabin," words and music by Jack Natteford, Raoul Kraushaar and Eddie Cherkose
"The Man in the Moon Is a Cowhand," words and music by Roy Rogers
"Shine On Harvest Moon," words and music by Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 December 1938
Production Date:
8 November--16 November 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8619
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA "High Fidelity" Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55
Length(in feet):
5,085
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
4881
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Milt Brower, Roy Rogers' partner in a Wyoming cattle ranch, is disturbed when Jackson, his former partner, comes and asks for help in his cattle rustling scheme. Because the Rogers-Brower ranch is close to his "hole" in the mountains, Jackson warns Brower to become his partner again, or face the consequences. Brower refuses, but when his former relationship with Jackson becomes public knowledge, Homer Sheldon, president of the bank and the Teton Cattlemen's Association, accuses him of supplying Jackson with inside information. The next day, when Sheldon's cattle are stolen from Brower's ranch, Brower rides away before the sheriff can arrest him. Evidence seems conclusive that Brower is guilty, but Brower has merely gone to Jackson's hideout to confront him. While Jackson holds Brower prisoner, he and his men go into town for the annual Fourth of July picnic. With no evidence against them, they cannot be arrested, and as they ride away, Jackson hands Sheldon a note which Sheldon claims is an "application" to join the Cattlemen's Association. Sheldon then hires a men to kill Roy, whom he thinks is getting too suspicious. When Roy outwits the killer, he discovers in the man's wallet the note that Jackson handed to Sheldon. Instead of an application, it is a message about the delivery of stolen cattle, which Roy takes to the sheriff. They set a trap for Sheldon and Jackson in which they tell only Sheldon about an important cattle roundup. After Jackson and his men are killed during the battle with the sheriff, Sheldon is arrested for his part in the rustling. Brower is badly wounded, but survives and is cleared ... +


Milt Brower, Roy Rogers' partner in a Wyoming cattle ranch, is disturbed when Jackson, his former partner, comes and asks for help in his cattle rustling scheme. Because the Rogers-Brower ranch is close to his "hole" in the mountains, Jackson warns Brower to become his partner again, or face the consequences. Brower refuses, but when his former relationship with Jackson becomes public knowledge, Homer Sheldon, president of the bank and the Teton Cattlemen's Association, accuses him of supplying Jackson with inside information. The next day, when Sheldon's cattle are stolen from Brower's ranch, Brower rides away before the sheriff can arrest him. Evidence seems conclusive that Brower is guilty, but Brower has merely gone to Jackson's hideout to confront him. While Jackson holds Brower prisoner, he and his men go into town for the annual Fourth of July picnic. With no evidence against them, they cannot be arrested, and as they ride away, Jackson hands Sheldon a note which Sheldon claims is an "application" to join the Cattlemen's Association. Sheldon then hires a men to kill Roy, whom he thinks is getting too suspicious. When Roy outwits the killer, he discovers in the man's wallet the note that Jackson handed to Sheldon. Instead of an application, it is a message about the delivery of stolen cattle, which Roy takes to the sheriff. They set a trap for Sheldon and Jackson in which they tell only Sheldon about an important cattle roundup. After Jackson and his men are killed during the battle with the sheriff, Sheldon is arrested for his part in the rustling. Brower is badly wounded, but survives and is cleared of suspicion. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.