The Dark Angel (1935)

105 mins | Drama | 8 September 1935

Director:

Sidney Franklin

Producer:

Samuel Goldwyn

Cinematographer:

Gregg Toland

Editor:

Sherman Todd

Production Designer:

Richard Day

Production Company:

Samuel Goldwyn, Inc.
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HISTORY

Playwright Guy Bolton was credited by a pseudonymn, H. B. Trevelyan, when his 1925 play was produced; contemporary sources variously list the play's author as Bolton or Trevelyan. The Dark Angel was Merle Oberon's first film for Samuel Goldwyn. Ronald Colman, Vilma Banky, and Wyndham Standing starred in a very successful silent version of The Dark Angel for Goldwyn in 1925, directed by George Fitzmaurice (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.1208). Most reviews commented that the two versions were equally good. Art director Richard Day won an Academy Award for his work on the picture, which was also nominated in the sound recording category. Oberon received a Best Actress Academy Award nomination for her performance in the film. Oberon starred in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast version of the story on 22 Jun ... More Less

Playwright Guy Bolton was credited by a pseudonymn, H. B. Trevelyan, when his 1925 play was produced; contemporary sources variously list the play's author as Bolton or Trevelyan. The Dark Angel was Merle Oberon's first film for Samuel Goldwyn. Ronald Colman, Vilma Banky, and Wyndham Standing starred in a very successful silent version of The Dark Angel for Goldwyn in 1925, directed by George Fitzmaurice (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.1208). Most reviews commented that the two versions were equally good. Art director Richard Day won an Academy Award for his work on the picture, which was also nominated in the sound recording category. Oberon received a Best Actress Academy Award nomination for her performance in the film. Oberon starred in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast version of the story on 22 Jun 1936. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Apr 35
p. 5.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
4 Sep 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Aug 35
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 35
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 35
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
30 Aug 35
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
13 Jul 35
p. 68
Motion Picture Herald
14 Sep 35
p. 35
New York Times
6 Sep 35
p. 12
Variety
11 Sep 35
p. 17
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Henrietta Crossman
Olaf Hytton
Andy Arbuckle
Vernon P. Downing
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst to Sidney Franklin
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Dark Angel by Guy Bolton (New York, 10 Feb 1925).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 September 1935
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 5 September 1935
Production Date:
1 June--19 July 1935
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corp.
Copyright Date:
5 September 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5751
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Wide Range Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
105
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1254
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Little Kitty Vane loves both Alan Trent and his cousin, Gerald Shannon, but she loves Alan more, and makes him promise to marry her when they grow up. Even as adults, the three are inseparable, but when England and Germany go to war in 1914, it is still Alan whom Kitty wants to marry, and when the cousins are on leave, Alan proposes. Although Gerald also loves Kitty, he gives them his blessing, but the two cannot marry when the leave is suddenly cancelled. Wanting to be with Alan as long as possible, Kitty spends the night with him before he leaves for France. They go to an inn together without telling anyone, and when Kitty's cousin, Lawrence Bidley, sees Alan, he assumes that Alan is spending the night with someone else. When Gerald learns, Alan still refuses to reveal that Kitty was with him, and the two men become estranged. Gerald refuses to grant Alan a leave in France, and one night Gerald sees Alan apparently die in an explosion. Kitty has sensed Alan's death, and when Gerald tells his feelings of guilt, she reveals that she was the woman at the inn. Gerald does not return home immediately after the war, but when he does, he begins to see Kitty. Meanwhile, Alan has returned to England but is still living under an assumed name. Because he was blinded in the war, he refuses to let his family or Kitty know that he is alive. He becomes a successful writer of children's books and has built an entirely new life. When his friend Sir George Barton visits him ... +


Little Kitty Vane loves both Alan Trent and his cousin, Gerald Shannon, but she loves Alan more, and makes him promise to marry her when they grow up. Even as adults, the three are inseparable, but when England and Germany go to war in 1914, it is still Alan whom Kitty wants to marry, and when the cousins are on leave, Alan proposes. Although Gerald also loves Kitty, he gives them his blessing, but the two cannot marry when the leave is suddenly cancelled. Wanting to be with Alan as long as possible, Kitty spends the night with him before he leaves for France. They go to an inn together without telling anyone, and when Kitty's cousin, Lawrence Bidley, sees Alan, he assumes that Alan is spending the night with someone else. When Gerald learns, Alan still refuses to reveal that Kitty was with him, and the two men become estranged. Gerald refuses to grant Alan a leave in France, and one night Gerald sees Alan apparently die in an explosion. Kitty has sensed Alan's death, and when Gerald tells his feelings of guilt, she reveals that she was the woman at the inn. Gerald does not return home immediately after the war, but when he does, he begins to see Kitty. Meanwhile, Alan has returned to England but is still living under an assumed name. Because he was blinded in the war, he refuses to let his family or Kitty know that he is alive. He becomes a successful writer of children's books and has built an entirely new life. When his friend Sir George Barton visits him in the country, he tells Alan that Gerald and Kitty are engaged when he sees their picture in a magazine because he recognizes them as the same people who were in a photograph of Alan's. When Alan, George and some local children go fishing the next day, they accidentally come upon Gerald and Kitty, who are staying nearby, when Kitty falls from her horse during a fox hunt. Kitty and George don't see Alan, but George tells Gerald about his friend who has kept a picture of Kitty and Gerald and Gerald realizes that the man must be Alan. Gerald and Kitty go to Alan's cottage, but Alan doesn't want their pity, and so pretends that he can still see but does not want to go back to his old life. Kitty and Gerald discover the truth, however, and Kitty goes to Alan, telling him that she never stopped loving him. They embrace and promise to be with each other always. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.