The Jungle Princess (1936)

84-85 mins | Adventure | 27 November 1936

Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Queen of the Jungle and Jungle Girl . The original screen story by Max Marcin was entitled "Queen of the Jungle." According to a news item in DV , which called the film Girl of the Jungle , Marcin was originally slated to co-direct. This was Dorothy Lamour's first feature film. Letters and memos in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS library indicate that in Jul 1935, Joseph I. Breen, director of the PCA, informed Paramount in a letter that although their script for Queen of the Jungle was "fundamentally acceptable from the standpoint of the Production Code and censorship," he was concerned about any hint of an "illicit sex relationship between Ulah and Christopher," and that "the whole business is offensive, an open violation of the Code, and [that] the very flavor of it should be eliminated." Breen further cautioned the studio to avoid "any display of nudity and any possible cruelty to animals."
       A final print, titled Jungle Girl , was submitted to the AMPP for approval in Oct 1936 and Breen rejected it due to the inferred sexual relationship between Ulah and Christopher. In a letter to Paramount, Breen advised the studio to "avoid all business of Chris carrying Ulah into the cave; all the discussion about the rain; the physical contact between them in the cave; and the fade-out on Chris as he kisses Ulah; [and]...the business of the picking of the lotus flowers." Breen also recommended the deletion of specific lines of dialogue, such as Christopher's line, "All she knows about civilized ways is just what ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Queen of the Jungle and Jungle Girl . The original screen story by Max Marcin was entitled "Queen of the Jungle." According to a news item in DV , which called the film Girl of the Jungle , Marcin was originally slated to co-direct. This was Dorothy Lamour's first feature film. Letters and memos in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS library indicate that in Jul 1935, Joseph I. Breen, director of the PCA, informed Paramount in a letter that although their script for Queen of the Jungle was "fundamentally acceptable from the standpoint of the Production Code and censorship," he was concerned about any hint of an "illicit sex relationship between Ulah and Christopher," and that "the whole business is offensive, an open violation of the Code, and [that] the very flavor of it should be eliminated." Breen further cautioned the studio to avoid "any display of nudity and any possible cruelty to animals."
       A final print, titled Jungle Girl , was submitted to the AMPP for approval in Oct 1936 and Breen rejected it due to the inferred sexual relationship between Ulah and Christopher. In a letter to Paramount, Breen advised the studio to "avoid all business of Chris carrying Ulah into the cave; all the discussion about the rain; the physical contact between them in the cave; and the fade-out on Chris as he kisses Ulah; [and]...the business of the picking of the lotus flowers." Breen also recommended the deletion of specific lines of dialogue, such as Christopher's line, "All she knows about civilized ways is just what I've been able to teach her myself," and Frank's response, "That ought to make her quite a girl." Although correspondence does not indicate whether all the recommended changes were made, the certificate of approval was issued to the film. The viewed print included several scenes recommended for deletion by Breen. A 1937 letter from Breen to Paramount indicates that a prologue was added to the film for release in Great Britain that "establishes Ulah as the daughter of a white man." According to the film's pressbook, Kata Ragoso of the Marova Lagoon in the Solomon Islands, acted as technical advisor for the construction of the Malayan village set. In her autobiography, Dorothy Lamour recalls that during the production, the chimpanzee, "Bogo," attacked a worker on the set, who later died of his injuries. Miss Lamour also states that the song was not written until ten days into production, and she was rehearsed by musician Perry Bodkin while on location at Brent's Crags in the San Fernando Valley, CA. She also notes that retakes were shot while she was filming Swing High, Swing Low (see below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Jul 36
p. 18.
Daily Variety
17 Nov 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Nov 36
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 36
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 36
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Nov 36
p. 13.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Oct 36
p. 42.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Nov 36
p. 66, 68
New York Times
24 Dec 36
p. 21.
Variety
30 Dec 36
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Story
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Props
SOURCES
SONGS
"Moonlight and Shadows," music and lyrics by Frederick Hollander and Leo Robin.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Girl of the Jungle
Jungle Girl
Queen of the Jungle
Release Date:
27 November 1936
Production Date:
began 6 July 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 November 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6755
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84-85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2595
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

American hunter Christopher Powell hurts his leg in the Malaysian jungle while on a tiger hunt. Abandoned by his native guides, who are afraid of the "Laughing Tiger," he is rescued by Ulah, a native who grew up alone in the jungle with her tiger "Limau" and chimpanzee "Bogo." Christopher's fellow hunters attempt to locate him, but are unsuccessful and assume he is dead. In the meantime, Christopher educates Ulah in rudimentary English, and they fall in love with each other. Realizing his duty to his fiancée Ava, Christopher finally returns to his camp, with Ulah and her animal friends following. Melan, leader of the natives guides, captures "Limau" believing him to be the laughing tiger of jungle superstition. Ulah rescues "Limau," but is then captured along with the hunters who try to help her. The natives tie up everyone and put Ulah in a pit into which they throw burning embers. After the tribal chief kills "Limau," Christopher frees himself and shoots Melan at the same time that "Bogo" and his chimpanzee companions attack the natives. Chaos ensues, the natives flee, and Christopher escapes with Ulah. Once normalcy is restored, all of the hunters leave except Christopher, who stays with Ulah, having been released from his engagement to ... +


American hunter Christopher Powell hurts his leg in the Malaysian jungle while on a tiger hunt. Abandoned by his native guides, who are afraid of the "Laughing Tiger," he is rescued by Ulah, a native who grew up alone in the jungle with her tiger "Limau" and chimpanzee "Bogo." Christopher's fellow hunters attempt to locate him, but are unsuccessful and assume he is dead. In the meantime, Christopher educates Ulah in rudimentary English, and they fall in love with each other. Realizing his duty to his fiancée Ava, Christopher finally returns to his camp, with Ulah and her animal friends following. Melan, leader of the natives guides, captures "Limau" believing him to be the laughing tiger of jungle superstition. Ulah rescues "Limau," but is then captured along with the hunters who try to help her. The natives tie up everyone and put Ulah in a pit into which they throw burning embers. After the tribal chief kills "Limau," Christopher frees himself and shoots Melan at the same time that "Bogo" and his chimpanzee companions attack the natives. Chaos ensues, the natives flee, and Christopher escapes with Ulah. Once normalcy is restored, all of the hunters leave except Christopher, who stays with Ulah, having been released from his engagement to Ava. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.