The Dark Horse (1932)

75 mins | Comedy-drama | 16 June 1932

Director:

Alfred E. Green

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

George Marks

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Var states that the press sheet credited the story to a pseudonymous source "close to Washington politics" and further notes that if so, the name of Melville Crossman (a pseudonym of Warner Bros. executive Darryl F. Zanuck) should be removed from the screen credits. Modern sources credit Sam Bischoff as associate ... More Less

Var states that the press sheet credited the story to a pseudonymous source "close to Washington politics" and further notes that if so, the name of Melville Crossman (a pseudonym of Warner Bros. executive Darryl F. Zanuck) should be removed from the screen credits. Modern sources credit Sam Bischoff as associate producer. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
11 Jun 32
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 32
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Jun 32
p. 35, 38
New York Times
9 Jun 32
p. 27.
Variety
14 Jun 32
p. 17.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 June 1932
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 8 June 1932
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 June 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3084
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

To break a deadlock at the Progressive party convention, dark horse candidate Zachary Hicks is nominated. Hicks is "so dumb that every time he opens his mouth he subtracts from the sum total of human knowledge," and the party leaders despair of getting him elected governor. Kay Russell, the secretary, suggests that they hire her boyfriend, Hal S. Blake, as campaign manager. They agree, only to find that he is in jail for non-payment of alimony. After they bail him out, Hal sets to work coaching Hicks, advising him to answer all questions, "well, yes, and again, no." When the conservative candidate, Underwood, gives the same Abraham Lincoln speech that Hal has planned for Hicks, Hal jumps up on stage and accuses him of plagiarism. Hicks continues to make public appearances all over the state without ever stating his position on the issues. Hal's ex-wife Maybelle visits campaign headquarters to demand her late alimony payment. Although Joe, Hal's assistant, tells her that Hal is not in the office, Hicks, who finds her attractive, tries to impress her by leading her directly to Hal. Hal somehow manages to come up with her weekly payment, but she is angry about its lateness, so when the opposition campaign manager approaches her with a plan to compromise Hicks, she agrees. On election eve, just after Kay finally agrees to marry him, Hal finds out that Maybelle has taken Hicks across the state line to the country, where they are to be found together playing strip poker. He manages to get Hicks away in time, but when members of the opposition discover Hal and ... +


To break a deadlock at the Progressive party convention, dark horse candidate Zachary Hicks is nominated. Hicks is "so dumb that every time he opens his mouth he subtracts from the sum total of human knowledge," and the party leaders despair of getting him elected governor. Kay Russell, the secretary, suggests that they hire her boyfriend, Hal S. Blake, as campaign manager. They agree, only to find that he is in jail for non-payment of alimony. After they bail him out, Hal sets to work coaching Hicks, advising him to answer all questions, "well, yes, and again, no." When the conservative candidate, Underwood, gives the same Abraham Lincoln speech that Hal has planned for Hicks, Hal jumps up on stage and accuses him of plagiarism. Hicks continues to make public appearances all over the state without ever stating his position on the issues. Hal's ex-wife Maybelle visits campaign headquarters to demand her late alimony payment. Although Joe, Hal's assistant, tells her that Hal is not in the office, Hicks, who finds her attractive, tries to impress her by leading her directly to Hal. Hal somehow manages to come up with her weekly payment, but she is angry about its lateness, so when the opposition campaign manager approaches her with a plan to compromise Hicks, she agrees. On election eve, just after Kay finally agrees to marry him, Hal finds out that Maybelle has taken Hicks across the state line to the country, where they are to be found together playing strip poker. He manages to get Hicks away in time, but when members of the opposition discover Hal and Maybelle together, they threaten to arrest Hal under the Mann Act, and he is forced to remarry Maybelle. Kay is furious until Hal explains that he has accepted a job in Nevada and will get a Reno divorce with no alimony. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.