Rhythm on the Range (1936)

85 or 87 mins | Comedy | 31 July 1936

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HISTORY

According to a 4 Oct 1935 HR news item, the rodeo sequences in this film were shot at Madison Square Garden, New York. This film marked the screen debut of Martha Raye. Bob Burns, a bazooka player from Van Buren, Arkansas, was a radio star and made a hit out of the title song, "Rhythm on the Range," at the time of this film's release. A contemporary source says the film's first premiere sold out within twenty-four hours when Burns was announced as a guest of honor. The FD review calls Raye a "female Joe E. Brown," stating, "with proper material and handling, [she] should go far." Scenarist John C. Moffitt went on leave from the Kansas City Star to write this film. A news item in HR on 30 Jan 1936 states that Paramount wanted Merle Oberon to star with Bing Crosby in the film and was negotiating with Samuel Goldwyn to borrow the actress; the negotiations apparently fell through. Although this film was not technically billed as a musical, ads boasted that it contained seven "hit songs." This film was remade by Paramount in 1956 as Pardners , directed by Norman Taurog and starring Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and Agnes ... More Less

According to a 4 Oct 1935 HR news item, the rodeo sequences in this film were shot at Madison Square Garden, New York. This film marked the screen debut of Martha Raye. Bob Burns, a bazooka player from Van Buren, Arkansas, was a radio star and made a hit out of the title song, "Rhythm on the Range," at the time of this film's release. A contemporary source says the film's first premiere sold out within twenty-four hours when Burns was announced as a guest of honor. The FD review calls Raye a "female Joe E. Brown," stating, "with proper material and handling, [she] should go far." Scenarist John C. Moffitt went on leave from the Kansas City Star to write this film. A news item in HR on 30 Jan 1936 states that Paramount wanted Merle Oberon to star with Bing Crosby in the film and was negotiating with Samuel Goldwyn to borrow the actress; the negotiations apparently fell through. Although this film was not technically billed as a musical, ads boasted that it contained seven "hit songs." This film was remade by Paramount in 1956 as Pardners , directed by Norman Taurog and starring Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and Agnes Moorehead. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Jul 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Mar 36
p. 8.
Film Daily
18 Jul 36
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 36
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 36
pp. 5-13.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 36
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Jul 36
p. 19.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Jul 36
p. 39.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Jul 36
p. 64, 66
New York Times
30 Jul 36
p. 22.
Variety
5 Aug 36
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Contr on special seq
Contr on special seq
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Cost des by
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
SOURCES
SONGS
"Empty Saddles," music by Billy Hill, lyrics by J. Keirn Brennan
"I'm an Old Cowhand from the Rio Grande," music and lyrics by Johnny Mercer
"Rhythm on the Range" and "Hang Up My Saddle," music by Richard A. Whiting, lyrics by Walter Bullock
+
SONGS
"Empty Saddles," music by Billy Hill, lyrics by J. Keirn Brennan
"I'm an Old Cowhand from the Rio Grande," music and lyrics by Johnny Mercer
"Rhythm on the Range" and "Hang Up My Saddle," music by Richard A. Whiting, lyrics by Walter Bullock
"I Can't Escape from You," music by Richard A. Whiting, lyrics by Leo Robin
"Roundup Lullaby," music and lyrics by Bager Clark and Gertrude Rose
"(If You Can't Sing It) You'll Have to Swing It" and "Mr. Paganini," music and lyrics by Sam Coslow
"The House That Jack Built for Jill," music by Frederick Hollander, lyrics by Leo Robin
"Drink It Down," music by Ralph Rainger, lyrics by Leo Robin.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 July 1936
Premiere Information:
Little Rock, AR premiere: 27 July 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 July 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6510
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85 or 87
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2321
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When ranch owner Penelope "Penny" Ryland arrives in New York for a rodeo contest at Madison Square Garden, she convinces her wealthy niece, Doris Halloway, not to marry a man she does not love. Hoping to rid herself of her father's Park Avenue lifestyle, Doris secretly hops Penny's train headed West and finds herself in the boxcar of cowboy and crooner Jeff Larrabee and his prized bull "Cuddles." Although they quarrel, Doris quickly becomes infatuated with Jeff and tells him she is Lois Hall, an unemployed cook. When Doris gives Shorty, a passenger on the train, a telegram for her banker father Robert, Shorty and his gangster friends scheme to take Doris hostage. Meanwhile, Doris and Jeff get left off the train after Doris, wearing a red scarf, is chased by Cuddles. Making their way West camping out of an old car, Doris and Jeff are nearly discovered by the gangsters, but finally arrive at Jeff's home in Green Pastures, Arizona. There, they find Jeff's partner Buck with Macy's salesgirl Emma Mazda, who has come to Frying Pan Ranch to meet her brother Gopher. The next day, Doris confesses her love for Jeff to Buck, who advises her to marry him before telling him who she really is. Later, when Buck and Emma announce their engagement, Buck needles Jeff into proposing to Doris. While the couples celebrate, Penny and Robert arrive by plane, having posted a reward of $5,000 for Doris' return. Finding her engaged to Jeff, Penny accuses him of being a fortune hunter, and Jeff, finally realizing Doris' true identity, leaves on his horse. Doris then offers the gangsters $5,000 ... +


When ranch owner Penelope "Penny" Ryland arrives in New York for a rodeo contest at Madison Square Garden, she convinces her wealthy niece, Doris Halloway, not to marry a man she does not love. Hoping to rid herself of her father's Park Avenue lifestyle, Doris secretly hops Penny's train headed West and finds herself in the boxcar of cowboy and crooner Jeff Larrabee and his prized bull "Cuddles." Although they quarrel, Doris quickly becomes infatuated with Jeff and tells him she is Lois Hall, an unemployed cook. When Doris gives Shorty, a passenger on the train, a telegram for her banker father Robert, Shorty and his gangster friends scheme to take Doris hostage. Meanwhile, Doris and Jeff get left off the train after Doris, wearing a red scarf, is chased by Cuddles. Making their way West camping out of an old car, Doris and Jeff are nearly discovered by the gangsters, but finally arrive at Jeff's home in Green Pastures, Arizona. There, they find Jeff's partner Buck with Macy's salesgirl Emma Mazda, who has come to Frying Pan Ranch to meet her brother Gopher. The next day, Doris confesses her love for Jeff to Buck, who advises her to marry him before telling him who she really is. Later, when Buck and Emma announce their engagement, Buck needles Jeff into proposing to Doris. While the couples celebrate, Penny and Robert arrive by plane, having posted a reward of $5,000 for Doris' return. Finding her engaged to Jeff, Penny accuses him of being a fortune hunter, and Jeff, finally realizing Doris' true identity, leaves on his horse. Doris then offers the gangsters $5,000 to catch Jeff, and the couple is reconciled. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.