Every Day's a Holiday (1938)

80 or 85 mins | Comedy | 14 January 1938

Writer:

Mae West

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Ray Curtiss

Production Designer:

Wiard B. Ihnen

Production Company:

Major Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library reveals that in Aug 1937, the PCA insisted on the following: "a) That the large number of offensively suggestive, or double-meaning, lines would be omitted; and, b) The excessive and unnecessary drinking and drunkenness would be deleted, and all drinking toned down to an absolute minimum." In addition, the following changes were recommended: "Peaches, Van and Graves will not be shown as drunk, and the business of cutting the pane of glass in the store window will be clouded in such a way as to get away from any definite detail of crime. The suggestion that Peaches is a thief will be cleared up by a line to the effect that a check will be sent for the goods in the morning....The business of Peaches kissing Quinn [possibly an error for Quade], to be followed by a slow fade-out, will be shot in such a way that there will be no possible indication of a sex affair between the two. This is important . Neither will it be indicated, at any time, that Peaches is a promiscuous woman, having associated heretofore with the 'Spanish fellow' and 'Frenchy.' It will also be clearly established that, at no time does Peaches live in the same house with Van and Graves." In an Aug 1937 letter to Joseph I. Breen, director of the PCA, producer Emanuel Cohen noted that "the basic characterization of Miss West in this picture is completely different from anything she has ever done before. There are no sex contacts nor sex situations that could possibly arouse the criticism that her ... More Less

Information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library reveals that in Aug 1937, the PCA insisted on the following: "a) That the large number of offensively suggestive, or double-meaning, lines would be omitted; and, b) The excessive and unnecessary drinking and drunkenness would be deleted, and all drinking toned down to an absolute minimum." In addition, the following changes were recommended: "Peaches, Van and Graves will not be shown as drunk, and the business of cutting the pane of glass in the store window will be clouded in such a way as to get away from any definite detail of crime. The suggestion that Peaches is a thief will be cleared up by a line to the effect that a check will be sent for the goods in the morning....The business of Peaches kissing Quinn [possibly an error for Quade], to be followed by a slow fade-out, will be shot in such a way that there will be no possible indication of a sex affair between the two. This is important . Neither will it be indicated, at any time, that Peaches is a promiscuous woman, having associated heretofore with the 'Spanish fellow' and 'Frenchy.' It will also be clearly established that, at no time does Peaches live in the same house with Van and Graves." In an Aug 1937 letter to Joseph I. Breen, director of the PCA, producer Emanuel Cohen noted that "the basic characterization of Miss West in this picture is completely different from anything she has ever done before. There are no sex contacts nor sex situations that could possibly arouse the criticism that her picture previously received. I think this is the most important thing to consider in this West picture." Here, Cohen refers to the complaints from the State and local censor boards and the Hays Office regarding previous West films.
       As noted by the Var review, this film was considered "less flagrantly sexy than previous Mae West screen exhibits." NYHT noted that "the new Mae West film...is clean and dull. The offering has almost none of the salty speech and suggestive gesture which have made the star the high priestess of innuendo." Despite these reviews, the PCA still received letters of complaint about the film, such as the letter from the San Francisco Motion Picture Council, which felt the film was "definitely vulgar." A pre-release advertisement in HR announced the Paramount production Sapphire Sal , a gay nineties musical to be produced for the 1937-1938 year. This may have been an early title for this film. According to press information, Joseph Cantling, former newspaperman, was technical advisor for a correct reproduction of a turn-of-the-century political rally. In her role as "Fifi," Mae West reenacted a scene from Camille in the manner of Sarah Bernhardt. West reportedly wore seventeen gowns in this film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Dec 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Dec 37
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 37
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 37
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 37
pp. 8-9.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 37
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
21 Dec 37
p. 11.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Nov 37
p. 51.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Dec 37
p. 36, 38
New York Herald Tribune
27 Jan 1938.
---
New York Times
27 Jan 38
p. 17.
VarB
20 Dec 1937.
---
Variety
22 Dec 37
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Emanuel Cohen Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
[Mus] arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Ensembles
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Fifi" and "Little Butterfly," music and lyrics by Sam Coslow
"Every Day's a Holiday," music and lyrics by Sam Coslow and Barry Trivers
"Jubilee," music and lyrics by Hoagy Carmichael and Stanley Adams.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sapphire Sal
Release Date:
14 January 1938
Production Date:
8 September--mid November 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 January 1938
Copyright Number:
LP7739
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3900
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In turn-of-the-century New York, Peaches O'Day, a noted female con artist, is wanted by the police. Having a grudging admiration for Peaches, Captain Jim McCarey tells her to leave town so he does not have to arrest her. Peaches manages to befriend Von Reighle Van Doon's butler Larmadou Graves, and the three become friends. They attend a gala New Year's Eve celebration at Rector's, a posh club, and there Peaches' manager, Nifty Bailey, hits on the idea of introducing Peaches in a stage show as Fifi, a famous French performer, thereby allowing her to perform in New York in disguise. Peaches goes to Boston to elude the law, but returns and impersonates Fifi, wearing a black wig, financed by Van Doon. When Peaches rebuffs the advances of the crooked chief of police, John Quade, he becomes enraged and orders that McCarey close the show due to non-existent fire hazards. When McCarey refuses, Quade takes his badge. As Fifi, Peaches visits Quade at his office to regain his favor, and while he is out of the room, she steals her criminal record, as well as those of Quade's henchmen. Both McCarey and Quade become wise to Peaches' disguise, but when Quade threatens her, McCarey throws him out of her dressing room. Peaches then proposes that McCarey run for mayor against Quade. Quade's men kidnap McCarey just prior to his speech in Madison Square Garden. Peaches keeps up the campaign for McCarey, vowing that she will run if he does not reappear. Finally, McCarey breaks loose from the kidnappers and appears just in time to make his speech and knock Quade silly. ... +


In turn-of-the-century New York, Peaches O'Day, a noted female con artist, is wanted by the police. Having a grudging admiration for Peaches, Captain Jim McCarey tells her to leave town so he does not have to arrest her. Peaches manages to befriend Von Reighle Van Doon's butler Larmadou Graves, and the three become friends. They attend a gala New Year's Eve celebration at Rector's, a posh club, and there Peaches' manager, Nifty Bailey, hits on the idea of introducing Peaches in a stage show as Fifi, a famous French performer, thereby allowing her to perform in New York in disguise. Peaches goes to Boston to elude the law, but returns and impersonates Fifi, wearing a black wig, financed by Van Doon. When Peaches rebuffs the advances of the crooked chief of police, John Quade, he becomes enraged and orders that McCarey close the show due to non-existent fire hazards. When McCarey refuses, Quade takes his badge. As Fifi, Peaches visits Quade at his office to regain his favor, and while he is out of the room, she steals her criminal record, as well as those of Quade's henchmen. Both McCarey and Quade become wise to Peaches' disguise, but when Quade threatens her, McCarey throws him out of her dressing room. Peaches then proposes that McCarey run for mayor against Quade. Quade's men kidnap McCarey just prior to his speech in Madison Square Garden. Peaches keeps up the campaign for McCarey, vowing that she will run if he does not reappear. Finally, McCarey breaks loose from the kidnappers and appears just in time to make his speech and knock Quade silly. It is then revealed that Peaches herself had Quade's men kidnap McCarey to strengthen his public appeal, and she paid them off by giving them their police files. McCarey wins the campaign and Peaches. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.