One Year Later (1933)

65, 67 or 69 mins | Drama | 25 August 1933

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Three Castles . According to a HR news item, it was to be the first of four projected specials produced by ... More Less

The working title of this film was Three Castles . According to a HR news item, it was to be the first of four projected specials produced by Allied. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
16 Nov 33
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
4 Nov 33
p. 174.
HF
24 Jun 33
p. 8.
HH
22 Jun 33
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 33
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Nov 33
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Aug 33
p. 48, 50
The Exhibitor
25 Aug 33
p. 1.
Variety
21 Nov 33
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Prod mgr
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cine
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Three Castles
Release Date:
25 August 1933
Production Date:
began mid June 1933 at RKO Pathé Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
9 August 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4094
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System at RKO Pathé Studio
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65, 67 or 69
Length(in feet):
6,112 , 6,172
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Playful newlyweds Jim and Molly Collins travel to New York on their honeymoon in a railroad car named "Happy Valley." One year later, on Christmas Eve, Jim is escorted onto the same railroad car by Deputy Russell to travel to prison, where he is scheduled to die in the electric chair on New Year's Eve. Molly tries to talk to Jim, but he rebuffs her and calls her a tramp. She boards the train, along with a varied group of other passengers, including an actor, a singer and dancer, a gold digger, a philandering husband, a detective and Tony Richards, a reporter with a bad cough who is going to a sanitarium. After Tony apologizes to Molly for his sensational account of Jim's trial, he offers to help, and she relates the true story of what happened: In the past, she tries to stop Jim's boss Grant from making advances. Grant visits her and offers an expensive present, which she refuses. He demands a drink before leaving, and after Molly complies, Jim catches them together. Thinking the worst, he threatens to kill Grant if he does not keep away from Molly. Grant fires Jim, and when Jim is unable to get another job, Molly visits Grant to try to change his mind. Jim follows her and during a fight, Grant is accidentally shot and killed. During the trial, Tony's articles, based on police evidence, portray Molly as a streetwalker, and Jim is convicted of first-degree murder. In the present, on the train, Molly explains to Tony that she fears he will go to the chair believing the articles. Tony ... +


Playful newlyweds Jim and Molly Collins travel to New York on their honeymoon in a railroad car named "Happy Valley." One year later, on Christmas Eve, Jim is escorted onto the same railroad car by Deputy Russell to travel to prison, where he is scheduled to die in the electric chair on New Year's Eve. Molly tries to talk to Jim, but he rebuffs her and calls her a tramp. She boards the train, along with a varied group of other passengers, including an actor, a singer and dancer, a gold digger, a philandering husband, a detective and Tony Richards, a reporter with a bad cough who is going to a sanitarium. After Tony apologizes to Molly for his sensational account of Jim's trial, he offers to help, and she relates the true story of what happened: In the past, she tries to stop Jim's boss Grant from making advances. Grant visits her and offers an expensive present, which she refuses. He demands a drink before leaving, and after Molly complies, Jim catches them together. Thinking the worst, he threatens to kill Grant if he does not keep away from Molly. Grant fires Jim, and when Jim is unable to get another job, Molly visits Grant to try to change his mind. Jim follows her and during a fight, Grant is accidentally shot and killed. During the trial, Tony's articles, based on police evidence, portray Molly as a streetwalker, and Jim is convicted of first-degree murder. In the present, on the train, Molly explains to Tony that she fears he will go to the chair believing the articles. Tony explains the truth to Jim, who then agrees to see Molly, and they reconcile. Tony, who has tuberculosis, then devises a plan to save Jim. As the train approaches a bridge, Tony knocks out Russell and, after exchanging clothes with Jim, sends him to sit with Molly. When the train goes over the bridge, Tony jumps to his death, and everyone believes that Jim has killed himself. Molly and Jim, posing as Tony, then get off together at the sanitarium and walk to freedom. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.