I'll Never Forget You (1951)

89-91 mins | Romance | December 1951

Director:

Roy Baker

Producer:

Sol C. Siegel

Cinematographer:

Georges Perinal

Editor:

Alan Osbiston

Production Designer:

C. P. Norman

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Berkeley Square , No. 9 Berkeley Square , Beyond Time and Space , Man of Two Worlds and The House on the Square , which was also the British release title. Although contemporary sources note that the picture begins in black and white, and then transforms to Technicolor when the modern "Peter Standish" goes back in time to 1784, the viewed print was only in black and white.
       A 30 Jul 1945 HR news item stated that Gregory Peck and Maureen O'Hara were set to star in the picture, although the project was then suspended until 1950. According to a Jul 1950 HR news item, Micheline Prelle was set to co-star with Tyrone Power. Prelle was replaced by Constance Smith, who, according to a 15 Mar 1951 HR news item, was replaced by Ann Blyth after Smith became ill with pneumonia. A 1 Apr 1951 NYT article, however, claimed that Smith was replaced by Blyth because studio production chief Darryl F. Zanuck did not feel that Smith was "sufficiently experienced for such a difficult part." A modern source asserts that Jean Simmons had been sought to play opposite Power, and that Carol Reed had been asked to direct the project. Although a Feb 1951 HR news item includes Margaret Johnston and Geoffrey Sumner in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed. Contemporary sources report that the film was shot entirely on location in London, England.
       On 22 Sep 1952, Power reprised his role for a ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Berkeley Square , No. 9 Berkeley Square , Beyond Time and Space , Man of Two Worlds and The House on the Square , which was also the British release title. Although contemporary sources note that the picture begins in black and white, and then transforms to Technicolor when the modern "Peter Standish" goes back in time to 1784, the viewed print was only in black and white.
       A 30 Jul 1945 HR news item stated that Gregory Peck and Maureen O'Hara were set to star in the picture, although the project was then suspended until 1950. According to a Jul 1950 HR news item, Micheline Prelle was set to co-star with Tyrone Power. Prelle was replaced by Constance Smith, who, according to a 15 Mar 1951 HR news item, was replaced by Ann Blyth after Smith became ill with pneumonia. A 1 Apr 1951 NYT article, however, claimed that Smith was replaced by Blyth because studio production chief Darryl F. Zanuck did not feel that Smith was "sufficiently experienced for such a difficult part." A modern source asserts that Jean Simmons had been sought to play opposite Power, and that Carol Reed had been asked to direct the project. Although a Feb 1951 HR news item includes Margaret Johnston and Geoffrey Sumner in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed. Contemporary sources report that the film was shot entirely on location in London, England.
       On 22 Sep 1952, Power reprised his role for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story, which co-starred Debra Paget. Fox Film Corp. first filmed John L. Balderston's play in 1933 as Berkeley Square , which was directed by Frank Lloyd and starred Leslie Howard and Heather Angel (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). Among the many television dramatizations of the story are a 20 Mar 1949 version, directed by Paul Nickell and starring William Prince and Leueen MacGrath; a 13 Feb 1951 show, directed by Donald Davis and starring Richard Greene and Grace Kelly; and a 5 Feb 1959 presentation, directed by George Schaefer and starring John Kerr and Edna Best. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Dec 1951.
---
Daily Variety
11 Dec 1950.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jun 1951.
---
Daily Variety
7 Dec 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 1945.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 51
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 51
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 51
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 51
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 51
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 1951.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Dec 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Dec 51
p. 1133.
New York Times
1 Apr 1951.
---
New York Times
7 Dec 51
p. 35.
New York Times
8 Dec 51
p. 9.
New York Times
16 Dec 1951.
---
Variety
12 Dec 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus comp
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod supv
Scientific tech adv
Scientific tech adv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Berkeley Square by John L. Balderston, in collaboration with J. C. Squire (London, 6 Oct 1926), which was suggested by the unfinished novel The Sense of the Past by Henry James (London, 1917).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Berkeley Square
Beyond Time and Space
Man of Two Worlds
No. 9 Berkeley Square
The House on the Square
Release Date:
December 1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 7 December 1951
Los Angeles opening: 14 December 1951
Production Date:
29 January--early May 1951 at Denham Studios, London
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1437
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
col with b&w seq
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
89-91
Length(in reels):
9
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15114
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

American atomic scientist Dr. Peter Standish toils so relentlessly at a nuclear laboratory in London that his supervisor, Dr. Ronson, and co-worker, Roger Forsyth, worry that Standish's intense dedication to his work will ruin his health. At the end of one day, Forsyth gives Standish a ride to his eighteenth-century residence in Berkeley Square and suggests that he take a vacation. Standish, who inherited the house from a distant ancestor, explains to Forsyth that he will be leaving for a while. Forsyth's concern for Standish's mental health deepens as Standish explains that the house was once owned by the first Peter Standish, an American who came to London to marry his cousin, Kate Pettigrew, in 1784. Standish has found a diary and other documents belonging to his ancestor and, due to their strange nature, believes that he will be able to switch places in time with the first Standish that very night. Forsyth states that Standish's obsession with the eighteenth century is crazy, but Standish maintains that it was a time of reason and graciousness, much preferable to the chaos of the current century. Forsyth eventually leaves, and after Standish sees him to his car, a bolt of lightning hits him as he re-enters the house. When Standish regains consciousness, he discovers that he is wearing different clothes, and upon entering the house, he is greeted by Kate Pettigrew; her mother, Lady Anne; her brother Tom and their friend, Mr. Throstle. After realizing that he has gone back in time, Standish recovers his composure and delights in meeting the people about whom he already knows so much. Standish is taken aback, ... +


American atomic scientist Dr. Peter Standish toils so relentlessly at a nuclear laboratory in London that his supervisor, Dr. Ronson, and co-worker, Roger Forsyth, worry that Standish's intense dedication to his work will ruin his health. At the end of one day, Forsyth gives Standish a ride to his eighteenth-century residence in Berkeley Square and suggests that he take a vacation. Standish, who inherited the house from a distant ancestor, explains to Forsyth that he will be leaving for a while. Forsyth's concern for Standish's mental health deepens as Standish explains that the house was once owned by the first Peter Standish, an American who came to London to marry his cousin, Kate Pettigrew, in 1784. Standish has found a diary and other documents belonging to his ancestor and, due to their strange nature, believes that he will be able to switch places in time with the first Standish that very night. Forsyth states that Standish's obsession with the eighteenth century is crazy, but Standish maintains that it was a time of reason and graciousness, much preferable to the chaos of the current century. Forsyth eventually leaves, and after Standish sees him to his car, a bolt of lightning hits him as he re-enters the house. When Standish regains consciousness, he discovers that he is wearing different clothes, and upon entering the house, he is greeted by Kate Pettigrew; her mother, Lady Anne; her brother Tom and their friend, Mr. Throstle. After realizing that he has gone back in time, Standish recovers his composure and delights in meeting the people about whom he already knows so much. Standish is taken aback, however, by the arrival of Kate's lovely sister Helen, about whom there was no mention in the historical papers. As the days pass, the Pettigrews are disturbed by Standish's eerie foreknowledge of events and his odd manners, although Helen is attracted to him. Standish returns Helen's feelings, but becomes disenchanted with the eighteenth century when he discovers that the majority of the population live in filth and poverty. The Pettigrews and their social circle are more narrow-minded than Standish had imagined, and he loses patience with their prejudices. Upon meeting renowned painter Joshua Reynolds, Standish reveals his knowledge of Reynolds' painting entitled "The Tragic Muse," even though Reynolds has just begun the project and not yet told anyone its name. Such occurrences prompt Kate to fear her cousin, and she also grows nervous about the attention he pays to Helen. Standish confides in Helen that he is from the future and takes her to his secret laboratory, where he has been "inventing" photography, a steamship, electricity and other innovations that he hopes will help the common people. Helen is not shocked by Standish's revelations, and drawing comfort from her support, he calls her "the only real beauty in this ugly century." That night, at a party hosted by the Pettigrews, Standish ignores Kate to dance with Helen, much to the chagrin of Throstle, who hopes to marry Helen himself. Standish meets the famed Duchess of Devonshire, Dr. Johnson and James Boswell, but when he praises the duchess, she is chilled by his statements, for he sounds as if he were reading her obituary. Having thus frightened more of his acquaintences, Standish confronts Kate, who declares that she will not marry him. Standish insists that she will, and that they will have two children, further upsetting her. Kate storms out, and after the party, Helen questions Standish about the future. When she gazes into his eyes, Helen sees scenes of Standish's life in the future, but is not frightened. Standish and Kate profess their love, and Kate assures him that their love will exist for all time. Soon after, Throstle notifies the Bow Street magistrate about Standish's laboratory, and after his experiments are destroyed by the fearful constables, Standish is questioned by Sir William Sutherland, a physician. Despite Standish's pleas as one scientific man to another, Sutherland decides to commit him to Bedlam. Standish rushes to Helen's room to say goodbye, and she places a crux ansata , an Egyptian symbol of life and eternity, in a hidden drawer in her desk to remind him of her love for him. Helen swears her eternal love for Standish, and he is then escorted out by the guards. Lightning strikes him again, however, and Standish regains consciouness back in his own time. Forsyth arrives and informs him that he has been having a nervous breakdown for the past seven weeks. When Forsyth describes his unusual behavior, Standish realizes that he did change places with his ancestor, who was horrified by modern life. Standish then goes to Helen's old room and finds the crux ansata , after which Forsyth is joined by his sister Martha, who had helped to care for Standish during his illness. Standish is amazed at Martha's appearance, as she is an exact double for Helen. Standish then goes to the churchyard where Helen had said that she would be buried, and there he learns that she died soon after he and the other Standish switched places again. Remembering Helen's promise that they would be together in God's time, Standish gazes at Martha and leaves with her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.