Comin' Round the Mountain (1951)

76-77 mins | Comedy | July 1951

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HISTORY

The film's working title was The Real McCoy . Shaye Cogan made her feature film debut in this picture. Margaret Hamilton's character "Aunt Huddy" strongly resembles her "Wicked Witch of the West" character from the 1939 M-G-M film The Wizard of Oz . According to a HR news item, Billy Snyder was cast, but his appearance in the final flim has not been confirmed. The HR review erroneously lists the film's running time as 62 ... More Less

The film's working title was The Real McCoy . Shaye Cogan made her feature film debut in this picture. Margaret Hamilton's character "Aunt Huddy" strongly resembles her "Wicked Witch of the West" character from the 1939 M-G-M film The Wizard of Oz . According to a HR news item, Billy Snyder was cast, but his appearance in the final flim has not been confirmed. The HR review erroneously lists the film's running time as 62 minutes. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Jun 1951.
---
Daily Variety
15 Jun 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Jun 51
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 51
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 51
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jul 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Jun 51
p. 887.
New York Times
21 Jan 1951.
---
New York Times
27 Jul 51
p. 15.
Variety
20 Jun 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Score
Score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Dial dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Agnes Clung," words and music by Dorothy Shay and Hessie Smith
"Why Don't Someone Marry Mary Anne" and "Sagebrush Sadie," words and music by George Beatty and Betty Wood
"You Broke Your Promise," words and music by Irving Taylor, George Wyle and Eddie Pola
+
SONGS
"Agnes Clung," words and music by Dorothy Shay and Hessie Smith
"Why Don't Someone Marry Mary Anne" and "Sagebrush Sadie," words and music by George Beatty and Betty Wood
"You Broke Your Promise," words and music by Irving Taylor, George Wyle and Eddie Pola
"You'll Be Another Notch on Father's Shotgun," words and music by Robert Wrubel and Allie Wrubel.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Real McCoy
Release Date:
July 1951
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 18 July 1952
New York opening: 20 July 1951
Production Date:
15 January--15 February 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
28 May 1951
Copyright Number:
LP972
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-77
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15220
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At nightclub Chez Bleu, talent agent Al Stewart books one smash act, singer Dorothy "The Manhattan Hillbilly" McCoy, with the escape-artist routine of his pal Wilbert Smith. Wilbert's bumbling act ends when a mouse runs up his pants and he screams. Although Al and Wilbert are thrown out of the club, they are pleased to discover that Dorothy recognizes Wilbert's unique yell as that of her clan, the McCoys. She explains that Grandpa "Squeezebox" McCoy left millions in buried treasure in the hills of Kentucky, and that Granny will reveal the hiding place only when one of Squeezebox's relatives returns. Bearing proof of his lineage--Squeezebox's photograph and concertina--Wilbert travels to Kentucky with Al and Dorothy. There, Dorothy first informs them about the age-old feud between the McCoys and the Winfields, then introduces them to the hillbilly McCoys. The assorted cousins declare Wilbert a runt and insist that he prove his mettle by winning the county fair turkey shoot. At the fair, Dorothy's singing attracts the attention of a handsome Easterner who is scouting for unspoiled talent. After admitting that his name is Clark Winfield, he and Dorothy agree to disregard the feud for the sake of their mutual attraction. The turkey shoot begins, and Al, eager to uncover the family fortune, pays teenager Matt McCoy, who has a crush on Wilbert, to hide behind a tree and shoot for him. Wilbert wins the shoot, but when Winfield clan leader Devil Dan accuses him of cheating, a shootout erupts between the two families. After spending the night in bed with four other cousins and assorted farm animals, Wilbert discovers that Granny wants him to marry Matt as a condition for ... +


At nightclub Chez Bleu, talent agent Al Stewart books one smash act, singer Dorothy "The Manhattan Hillbilly" McCoy, with the escape-artist routine of his pal Wilbert Smith. Wilbert's bumbling act ends when a mouse runs up his pants and he screams. Although Al and Wilbert are thrown out of the club, they are pleased to discover that Dorothy recognizes Wilbert's unique yell as that of her clan, the McCoys. She explains that Grandpa "Squeezebox" McCoy left millions in buried treasure in the hills of Kentucky, and that Granny will reveal the hiding place only when one of Squeezebox's relatives returns. Bearing proof of his lineage--Squeezebox's photograph and concertina--Wilbert travels to Kentucky with Al and Dorothy. There, Dorothy first informs them about the age-old feud between the McCoys and the Winfields, then introduces them to the hillbilly McCoys. The assorted cousins declare Wilbert a runt and insist that he prove his mettle by winning the county fair turkey shoot. At the fair, Dorothy's singing attracts the attention of a handsome Easterner who is scouting for unspoiled talent. After admitting that his name is Clark Winfield, he and Dorothy agree to disregard the feud for the sake of their mutual attraction. The turkey shoot begins, and Al, eager to uncover the family fortune, pays teenager Matt McCoy, who has a crush on Wilbert, to hide behind a tree and shoot for him. Wilbert wins the shoot, but when Winfield clan leader Devil Dan accuses him of cheating, a shootout erupts between the two families. After spending the night in bed with four other cousins and assorted farm animals, Wilbert discovers that Granny wants him to marry Matt as a condition for turning over the treasure. Granny soon learns, however, that Wilbert loves Dorothy, and decides that even Wilbert would be a better match for Dorothy than Clark. To ensure the union, she sends Wilbert and Al to Aunt Huddy, a witch, who gives them a potion that causes whomever drinks it to fall in love with the first person he sees. That night, Dorothy drinks the potion and falls in love with Wilbert, but immediately afterward, Wilbert inadvertently drinks it and falls for Matt, who then drinks some and swoons over Al. Frustrated by the dueling romances, the McCoys demand that Wilbert marry Matt. At the wedding, cousin Kalem holds the bride and groom at gunpoint, but Dorothy arrives with her own shotgun and pushes Matt aside. Just as the judge recites the vows, however, the potion wears off and Dorothy faints into Clark's waiting arms. Before anyone can be married, the angry Winfields appear. Granny wants to end the feud, but when Wilbert starts the McCoy jalopy, the Winfields mistake the backfiring noise for a gunshot and begin shooting. Devil Dan attacks Wilbert and Al, but Matt knocks Dan out and reveals the treasure map she discovered in the folds of Wilbert's concertina. Dan revives but, after accidentally drinking the love potion, embraces Wilbert and declares the feud over. Using the map, they all head for an abandoned mine, but just as they enter, the potion wears off and Dan calls his clan and chases after Wilbert and Al. The two friends trap the Winfields in the mine shaft but are soon on the run from the McCoys, who want the treasure. As part of their effort to escape, Wilbert and Al burst into a secret room and uncover piles of gold bars. When they attempt to take a bar, however, military policemen arrive and inform them they have infiltrated Fort Knox. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.