Crazy Over Horses (1951)

64-65 mins | Comedy | 18 November 1951

Director:

William Beaudine

Writers:

Tim Ryan, Max Adams

Producer:

Ben Schwalb

Cinematographer:

Marcel Le Picard

Editor:

William Austin

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Working titles of this film were Win, Place and Show and Straight, Place, Show . The onscreen title cards read: "Monogram Pictures Corporation presents Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys Crazy Over Horses ." As noted in a 21 Jun 1951 HR news item, Crazy Over Horses was producer Ben Schwalb's first Bowery Boys series film. Schwalb took over for Jan Grippo, who produced many of the Bowery Boys series in the 1940s. Only Tim Ryan is credited onscreen as the film's screenwriter; however, the Var review and a revised SAB, contained in the film's file at the AMPAS Library, list Max Adams as Ryan's co-writer. For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Live Wires in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ... More Less

Working titles of this film were Win, Place and Show and Straight, Place, Show . The onscreen title cards read: "Monogram Pictures Corporation presents Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys Crazy Over Horses ." As noted in a 21 Jun 1951 HR news item, Crazy Over Horses was producer Ben Schwalb's first Bowery Boys series film. Schwalb took over for Jan Grippo, who produced many of the Bowery Boys series in the 1940s. Only Tim Ryan is credited onscreen as the film's screenwriter; however, the Var review and a revised SAB, contained in the film's file at the AMPAS Library, list Max Adams as Ryan's co-writer. For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Live Wires in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1951
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1951
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1951
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Dec 1951
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
31 Dec 1951.
---
Variety
28 Nov 1951
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jerry Thomas Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Set cont
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Win, Place and Show
Straight, Place, Show
Release Date:
18 November 1951
Production Date:
16 August--late August 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 November 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1338
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64-65
Length(in feet):
5,816
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15546
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When they learn stable owner Flynn owes their friend, soda shop owner Louie Dumbrowsky, $250, the Bowery Boys gang--Slip Mahoney, Sach, Whitey, Butch and Chuck--offer to collect the two-year-old debt. At Sunnybrook Hunting and Riding Club, the mild-mannered Flynn explains that business is bad and he cannot pay, while Flynn’s attractive daughter Terry, who is grooming a racehorse outside, distracts the gang. Flynn prevails upon them to accept “my girl,” as payment for the debt, describing her as fit, sound and pretty. The gang assumes Flynn is trading his daughter, but when they go outside to look at the merchandise, Flynn introduces them to Terry and the racehorse, My Girl, clearing up the confusion. Doc, who is responsible for the horse, has not paid room and board for My Girl in six months and it is Flynn’s legal right to sell her. The boys accept the deal and Sach rides "My Girl" to the soda shop, where Louie is perturbed about the gang returning with a horse instead of money. Back at the riding club, gangster Weepin’ Willie arrives to collect My Girl, and Flynn gives him Louie’s address. At the racetrack Willie informs Duke, the horseracing racket leader, that Doc, his employee, took off with the board money and My Girl has been sold to Louie to pay off the debt. Duke's plan is to replace Tarzana, who has just finished last in a race and has suffered a series of losses, with look-a-like horse My Girl, a sure bet at 20 to 1 odds. Duke, Willie and henchman Swifty go to the soda shop and offer $500 for the horse, but when Slip finds out that ... +


When they learn stable owner Flynn owes their friend, soda shop owner Louie Dumbrowsky, $250, the Bowery Boys gang--Slip Mahoney, Sach, Whitey, Butch and Chuck--offer to collect the two-year-old debt. At Sunnybrook Hunting and Riding Club, the mild-mannered Flynn explains that business is bad and he cannot pay, while Flynn’s attractive daughter Terry, who is grooming a racehorse outside, distracts the gang. Flynn prevails upon them to accept “my girl,” as payment for the debt, describing her as fit, sound and pretty. The gang assumes Flynn is trading his daughter, but when they go outside to look at the merchandise, Flynn introduces them to Terry and the racehorse, My Girl, clearing up the confusion. Doc, who is responsible for the horse, has not paid room and board for My Girl in six months and it is Flynn’s legal right to sell her. The boys accept the deal and Sach rides "My Girl" to the soda shop, where Louie is perturbed about the gang returning with a horse instead of money. Back at the riding club, gangster Weepin’ Willie arrives to collect My Girl, and Flynn gives him Louie’s address. At the racetrack Willie informs Duke, the horseracing racket leader, that Doc, his employee, took off with the board money and My Girl has been sold to Louie to pay off the debt. Duke's plan is to replace Tarzana, who has just finished last in a race and has suffered a series of losses, with look-a-like horse My Girl, a sure bet at 20 to 1 odds. Duke, Willie and henchman Swifty go to the soda shop and offer $500 for the horse, but when Slip finds out that they are willing to pay up to $1,000, he concludes the horse is a "gimmick" in a racehorse racket and refuses to sell. Later that night after the boys have left, Willie knocks at the soda shop door and distracts Louie while Duke and Swifty exchange Tarzana for My Girl. Later at his office Duke calls J. T. Randal, whose large bet rides on the My Girl ruse, telling him the “trouble” has been straightened out. The next morning the boys arrive back at the shop and find that the normally even-tempered My Girl has left the backroom in a shambles, and, she even attacks Sach, who had earlier befriended her. The gang takes the horse to Sunnybrook, and Terry and Flynn ascertain that, though she has the same markings, the horse is not My Girl, as she refuses to do Terry’s handkerchief trick. Back at the shop Louie tells the gang about Willie’s suspicious behavior the previous evening, and Slip assumes the horses have been switched and decides to switch them back. When the gang brings Tarzana to the racetrack stables, and are about to make the switch, however, a police officer approaches. Sach and Whitey distract him, but the horses switch places in the stall and Sach takes Tarzana by mistake. Back at Flynn’s, the handkerchief trick fails again and Slip is furious and kicks Sach out of the gang. The gang then drives to the racetrack stables and makes the switch, returning later to the riding club, where Terry confirms that they have the correct horse. Slip decides to run My Girl in the same race as Tarzana, thinking she will win. The gang leaves for the shop, and Sach, unaware that the switch has already taken place, decides he will prove his worth to the gang by making the switch himself. Wearing blackface, he takes My Girl to the racetrack stables and approaches the black groom who is walking Tarzana. While distracting him with antics, Sach switches the horses, bringing Tarzana back to the riding club. When the boys arrive back at the stable with Louie, Sach proudly announces his accomplishment, and Slip decides the only way to keep Sach out of trouble is to allow him back in the gang. That night the gang has secured the fee and the stall, but still need the right horse. Sach finds Willie, and following a plan devised by Slip, secretly admits that the gang switched horses, forcing Willie to go back to Duke and tell him they need to switch again. After dark, Duke, Willie and Swifty make the switch back. The next day My Girl wins the race in a photo finish with coaxing from her jockey, Sach. Duke tries to make a quick exit from town, but he and Randal are caught by the police and are taken away. Later at the soda shop, Louie throws a party for the heroes. Slip thanks Sach for his help and Sach returns the gratitude with a cream pie in Slip's face. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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