F.B.I. Girl (1951)

73-74 mins | Drama | November 1951

Director:

William Berke

Producer:

William Berke

Cinematographer:

Jack Greenhalgh

Editor:

Philip Cahn

Production Designer:

F. Paul Sylos

Production Company:

Lippert Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The opening title cards read, "Robert L. Lippert presents Cesar Romero, George Brent, Audrey Totter in Rupert Hughes' F.B.I. Girl ." No additional information about Hughes's story has been found, and it is possible that it was an original screen story.
       The film opens with a voice-over narration describing the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation as the symbol of international strength and hope, where criminal files are the responsibility of "nice, normal boys and girls" who could be susceptible to criminal influence. A 5 Jun 1951 HR news item adds Gene Evans to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been ... More Less

The opening title cards read, "Robert L. Lippert presents Cesar Romero, George Brent, Audrey Totter in Rupert Hughes' F.B.I. Girl ." No additional information about Hughes's story has been found, and it is possible that it was an original screen story.
       The film opens with a voice-over narration describing the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation as the symbol of international strength and hope, where criminal files are the responsibility of "nice, normal boys and girls" who could be susceptible to criminal influence. A 5 Jun 1951 HR news item adds Gene Evans to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Nov 1951.
---
Daily Variety
12 Nov 1951
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Nov 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1951
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1951
p. 2.
Los Angeles Daily News
30 Nov 1951.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
29 Nov 1951.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Nov 1951
p. 1110.
Variety
14 Nov 1951
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial supv
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Handknit fashions by
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on a short story by Rupert Hughes (publication undetermined).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Rupert Hughes' F.B.I. Girl
Release Date:
November 1951
Premiere Information:
World premiere in San Francisco, CA: 15 November 1951
Los Angeles opening: 28 November 1951
Production Date:
mid June--late June 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Jedgar Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 November 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1325
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73-74
Length(in feet):
6,673
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15485
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After publicly welcoming the forthcoming Senate Crime Committee inquiry, state governor Owen Grisby of Capitol City worries that if the committee investigates his fingerprints they will find that his real identity is John Williams, a man charged with murder. Grisby has been paying top lobbyist Carl Chercourt for protection, but his politically savvy henchman Blake warns that Carl cannot protect Grisby from the FBI and that they must destroy the fingerprint file if Grisby is to run for the Senate next year. To that end, Blake blackmails petty criminal Paul Craig into forcing his sister, Natalie Craig, an unsuspecting FBI file clerk in Washington D.C., to pull John Williams' file. The next day when Natalie pulls the file, Donald, another clerk, takes notice but Natalie irritably dismisses him. That night Blake's ruffians force Natalie's car to crash, killing her on impact, but do not find the file in the car. Later capable FBI agents Glen Stedman and Jeff Donley match fingerprints found at the scene of the crime to George Denton, a psychologically unstable, convicted murderer. That evening Donley and Stedman report the death to Natalie's roommate and fellow FBI file clerk Shirley Wayne, and she discloses that Paul and Natalie lunched together earlier that day and both seemed extremely nervous. When the agents question Paul, he claims not to have seen Natalie for several days and, though the agents are suspicious, they release him. The next day Donald tells Donley and Stedman about his encounter with Natalie, but admits he can not pick out the mysterious file from among the 10,000 other John Williams' files. In another part of Washington D.C., a hotel clerk identifies Denton as a ... +


After publicly welcoming the forthcoming Senate Crime Committee inquiry, state governor Owen Grisby of Capitol City worries that if the committee investigates his fingerprints they will find that his real identity is John Williams, a man charged with murder. Grisby has been paying top lobbyist Carl Chercourt for protection, but his politically savvy henchman Blake warns that Carl cannot protect Grisby from the FBI and that they must destroy the fingerprint file if Grisby is to run for the Senate next year. To that end, Blake blackmails petty criminal Paul Craig into forcing his sister, Natalie Craig, an unsuspecting FBI file clerk in Washington D.C., to pull John Williams' file. The next day when Natalie pulls the file, Donald, another clerk, takes notice but Natalie irritably dismisses him. That night Blake's ruffians force Natalie's car to crash, killing her on impact, but do not find the file in the car. Later capable FBI agents Glen Stedman and Jeff Donley match fingerprints found at the scene of the crime to George Denton, a psychologically unstable, convicted murderer. That evening Donley and Stedman report the death to Natalie's roommate and fellow FBI file clerk Shirley Wayne, and she discloses that Paul and Natalie lunched together earlier that day and both seemed extremely nervous. When the agents question Paul, he claims not to have seen Natalie for several days and, though the agents are suspicious, they release him. The next day Donald tells Donley and Stedman about his encounter with Natalie, but admits he can not pick out the mysterious file from among the 10,000 other John Williams' files. In another part of Washington D.C., a hotel clerk identifies Denton as a guest after seeing a wanted poster and calls Donley and Stedman, but Denning kills the clerk and escapes before the agents arrive. After they discover the clerk, the agents go directly to Paul's apartment and find him murdered as well. The next day, when the newspapers report that Paul is only near death, Denning sneaks into Paul's hospital room to finish the job and walks straight into the agents' trap, but falls to his death in an attempt to escape. At his office, Grisby considers resigning but the deviously determined Blake puts Grisby's fingerprints in an FBI file intended for an unidentified Capitol City drunk recently found dead. Blake explains that when the authorities send the prints to FBI headquarters for identification and match them to John Williams, the file will be closed because John Williams will be officially dead. Back at headquarters Donald receives the prints and, recognizing John Williams' name, takes them and the matching FBI file to Donley and Stedman, who discover the fingerprints match but the descriptions do not. They deduce that Williams is an influential man and fly to Capitol City to investigate the body, but no trace of the drunk's belongings or his remains are found for identification. Stedman flies back to Washington D.C. to enlist Shirley to get information from her fiancé--Carl Chercourt--who, the agents believe, knows Williams. Shirley refuses and later that night tells Carl that rumors inside the FBI implicate him in Natalie's death. Carl denies any involvement and calls Blake to question him about Williams. Blake responds by telling Carl he must force Shirley to pull Williams' file. Shirley at first submits to Carl's demand but later bravely offers to help the agents instead. That evening at Carl's apartment Shirley gives a phony file to Carl, who in turn gives it to Blake. The next day, using surveillance film showing Carl's visitors from the previous evening, the agents narrow the list of suspects. Meanwhile when Shirley leaves headquarters she is assailed by Blake, who, having identified the prints as fake, demands that she get the right ones. Shirley returns to headquarters and Donley gives her a forged set of prints and a wireless walkie-talkie disguised as a purse. Later when Carl and Blake pick her up from headquarters and drive to the governor's house, the police and FBI follow them, just out of sight but in range of the walkie-talkie signal. Once inside Blake burns the prints but Shirley claims to have made a duplicate set. When Blake grabs her purse to check, he discovers the radio and announces to Donley and Stedman, who are listening in, that he is taking Shirley hostage. Grisby, weary of the deception, surrenders, but just as Donley and Stedman arrive, Blake makes a run for it alone and jumps into a waiting speedboat. A police helicopter circling above shines a light on the boat while Stedman takes a shot, wounding Blake and causing his boat to crash. Grisby is taken into custody and the FBI successfully closes another case.

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.