He Ran All the Way (1951)

77-78 mins | Melodrama | 13 July 1951

Director:

John Berry

Producer:

Dunhill Dance Team

Cinematographer:

James Wong Howe

Editor:

Francis D. Lyon

Production Designer:

Harry Horner

Production Company:

Roberts Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a 24 May 1950 HR news item, the novel He Ran All the Way was originally bought by Liberty Films from author Sam Ross in 1947 as a directing vehicle for George Stevens. In 1950 Bob Roberts of Roberts Productions, Inc. bought the property from Liberty. A 10 Nov 1950 HR production chart credits Steve Bass with sound for the film, although onscreen credits list Vic Appel and Mac Dagleish. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office objected to the "excessive brutality" exhibited by the character "Nick Robey" and prohibited scenes showing a policeman being killed at the hands of criminals. The scene in which the policeman is shot was changed from an immediate death to the policeman being wounded at the time of the crime. Several of the film's violent scenes were altered and the policeman was wounded, instead of killed, in the opening scenes. Location shooting took place at the Long Beach Plunge public swimming pool and Nu-Pike, a mile-long waterfront amusement park in Long Beach, CA.
       Star John Garfield, who was blacklisted by the HUAC in 1951 for refusing to name friends as communists, died in 1952. He Ran All the Way was his last film. It was also the last feature-length film John Berry made before being identified as a communist and blacklisted by the HUAC. Although not listed in the credits, Dalton Trumbo co-wrote the film's screenplay with credited writer Hugo Butler. Trumbo was jailed in 1947 for refusing to testify before HUAC and his credit on the film was ... More Less

According to a 24 May 1950 HR news item, the novel He Ran All the Way was originally bought by Liberty Films from author Sam Ross in 1947 as a directing vehicle for George Stevens. In 1950 Bob Roberts of Roberts Productions, Inc. bought the property from Liberty. A 10 Nov 1950 HR production chart credits Steve Bass with sound for the film, although onscreen credits list Vic Appel and Mac Dagleish. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office objected to the "excessive brutality" exhibited by the character "Nick Robey" and prohibited scenes showing a policeman being killed at the hands of criminals. The scene in which the policeman is shot was changed from an immediate death to the policeman being wounded at the time of the crime. Several of the film's violent scenes were altered and the policeman was wounded, instead of killed, in the opening scenes. Location shooting took place at the Long Beach Plunge public swimming pool and Nu-Pike, a mile-long waterfront amusement park in Long Beach, CA.
       Star John Garfield, who was blacklisted by the HUAC in 1951 for refusing to name friends as communists, died in 1952. He Ran All the Way was his last film. It was also the last feature-length film John Berry made before being identified as a communist and blacklisted by the HUAC. Although not listed in the credits, Dalton Trumbo co-wrote the film's screenplay with credited writer Hugo Butler. Trumbo was jailed in 1947 for refusing to testify before HUAC and his credit on the film was officially restored by the WGA in 2000; Guy Endore acted as his front.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
9 Jun 1951.
---
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1951
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Jun 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1947.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1950
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 1950
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1950
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 1951
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4-6 Aug 2000.
---
Life
4 Jun 1951.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
16 Nov 1950.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1951.
---
Motion Picture Daily
1 Jun 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Jun 1951
pp. 877-78.
New York Times
19 Jun 1951
p. 33.
New York Times
21 Jun 1951
p. 24.
New York Times
24 Jun 1951.
---
New Yorker
20 Jun 1951.
---
Newsweek
25 Jun 1951.
---
Time
25 Jun 1951.
---
Variety
6 Jun 1951
p. 6.
Variety
21 Jun 1951.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Roberts Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Ed supv
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Asst to prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel He Ran All the Way by Sam Ross (New York, 1947)
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 July 1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 20 June 1951
Production Date:
6 November--mid December 1950 at Motion Picture Center Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Roberts Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 July 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1046
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77-78
Length(in feet):
7,069
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15055
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Despite having a premonition that he will forever be on the run for murdering a man, Nick Robey agrees on a plan to make some easy money with his disreputable pal, Al Molin. The two men rob a man for a company payroll at the local train yard warehouse, but before they can make their getaway, Al is killed by a policeman and Nick is forced to shoot the policeman in order to flee. Once on the street, Nick ducks into a public swimming pool to avoid the police and bumps into Peg Dobbs, a nervous beginning swimmer. Fearful that he will look conspicuous alone, Nick tries to act calm and asks to take her home. Peg naively agrees, flattered by the young man's interest, and he escorts her to her family's tenement apartment, where she introduces him to her father, mother and younger brother Tommy, who are on their way to see a movie. Now alone in the apartment, Nick is uneasy and brusquely dances with Peg to music on the radio. Peg urges him to relax but Nick breaks down, saying he is in big trouble. Later when her parents return home, Nick, suspicious that they already know his real identity, holds Peg at gunpoint and admits to being the killer. However, Mr. Dobbs, a newspaper press operator, says that the newspaper only identified Molin in the article. Though he does not want to hurt anyone, Nick decides he must spend the night to collect his thoughts before his next move. In the morning Mr. Dobbs tries to hide the paper that prominently features a picture of Nick, but Nick spies it and, thinking he has caught ... +


Despite having a premonition that he will forever be on the run for murdering a man, Nick Robey agrees on a plan to make some easy money with his disreputable pal, Al Molin. The two men rob a man for a company payroll at the local train yard warehouse, but before they can make their getaway, Al is killed by a policeman and Nick is forced to shoot the policeman in order to flee. Once on the street, Nick ducks into a public swimming pool to avoid the police and bumps into Peg Dobbs, a nervous beginning swimmer. Fearful that he will look conspicuous alone, Nick tries to act calm and asks to take her home. Peg naively agrees, flattered by the young man's interest, and he escorts her to her family's tenement apartment, where she introduces him to her father, mother and younger brother Tommy, who are on their way to see a movie. Now alone in the apartment, Nick is uneasy and brusquely dances with Peg to music on the radio. Peg urges him to relax but Nick breaks down, saying he is in big trouble. Later when her parents return home, Nick, suspicious that they already know his real identity, holds Peg at gunpoint and admits to being the killer. However, Mr. Dobbs, a newspaper press operator, says that the newspaper only identified Molin in the article. Though he does not want to hurt anyone, Nick decides he must spend the night to collect his thoughts before his next move. In the morning Mr. Dobbs tries to hide the paper that prominently features a picture of Nick, but Nick spies it and, thinking he has caught the family in a conspiracy against him, decides he must stay. He allows the family to continue their daily routine, but tensions rise as he keeps one family member with him at all times as a hostage. Later, while on lunch break from her bakery job, Peg returns to the apartment to plead with Nick to leave, reminding him that he liked her at the pool, but Nick snaps that his predicament was the only reason he took interest in her. Peg returns to the bakery, where her father demands that she hide out at a girl friend's house. On the assembly line Peg's co-worker suggests that Peg shed her shyness and that, with some primping, Peg could get a man to do anything for her. Back at home Peg is late and Mrs. Dobbs explains to Nick that she trusts her daughter. An argument begins after Nick tells her that Peg thinks fondly of him, but when Mrs. Dobbs becomes distracted, has a sewing accident and faints, Nick, in a moment of kindness, carries her to the couch. Mr. Dobbs returns home to find Tommy afraid to go in the apartment because Nick is now in command of the household. They enter the apartment and the family gathers for a feast provided by Nick, but Mr. Dobbs refuses to allow his family to eat the food. Challenged, Nick fires his gun, forcing Mr. Dobbs to back down. His banquet spoiled, Nick rebukes the family for not willingly giving him temporary shelter, "something you would give an alley cat." Much later in the night, Peg returns home in an evening gown and her womanly figure catches Nick's eye. He kisses her and, asking for her support, Peg replies "all the way." Later while the others sleep, Mr. Dobbs inspects the living room, finds Peg's gown draped across the chair and assumes the worst. The next morning Nick, confused by the loyalty of their family, asks what Mr. Dobbs wants out of life. Mr. Dobbs turns the question around on him and Nick answers "money." He then tells Mr. Dobbs that Peg is out buying a car for him and a fight ensues between the men, but is quickly broken up when Peg returns and announces that the car will be delivered later that evening. Meanwhile Mrs. Dobbs and Tommy report to the police that Nick is hiding at their family residence. At the apartment Nick, now paranoid, demands to know the kind of car Peg has bought and to see the receipt. Peg describes a yellow convertible, but when she cannot produce the receipt, Nick drags her at gunpoint down the stairs, hysterically accusing her of double-crossing him. Once they reach the bottom floor, Mr. Dobbs, who is waiting outside, fires a shot into the foyer. Nick drops his gun near Peg, leaps for cover to the other side of the foyer, then orders Peg to pick up the gun. She does, but Nick lurches forward to take it from her and she shoots him. Fatally wounded, Nick stumbles outside, finding the convertible waiting at the curb. Staring into its headlights, Nick falls over dead as Mr. Dobbs hugs his traumatized daughter to his side.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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