Painting the Clouds with Sunshine (1951)

86-87 or 90 mins | Romantic comedy | 10 October 1951

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

William Jacobs

Cinematographer:

Wilfrid M. Cline

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Edward Carrere

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Golddiggers in Las Vegas . Although a Nov 1950 HR news item states that Melville Shavelson and Jack Rose were assigned to write the script, their contribution to the completed film, if any, has not been confirmed. According to a Jan 1951 HR news item, portions of the film were shot in Las Vegas, NV. A Feb 1951 HR news item adds Brooks Benedict to the cast, but his appearance in the film has not been confirmed. According to a modern source, Virginia Mayo's singing voice was dubbed by Bonnie Lou Williams. Warner Bros. produced several earlier films based on Avery Hopwood's 1919 play The Gold Diggers . For more information about the "Gold Diggers" films, see the entry above for Gold Diggers of 1933 ... More Less

The working title of this film was Golddiggers in Las Vegas . Although a Nov 1950 HR news item states that Melville Shavelson and Jack Rose were assigned to write the script, their contribution to the completed film, if any, has not been confirmed. According to a Jan 1951 HR news item, portions of the film were shot in Las Vegas, NV. A Feb 1951 HR news item adds Brooks Benedict to the cast, but his appearance in the film has not been confirmed. According to a modern source, Virginia Mayo's singing voice was dubbed by Bonnie Lou Williams. Warner Bros. produced several earlier films based on Avery Hopwood's 1919 play The Gold Diggers . For more information about the "Gold Diggers" films, see the entry above for Gold Diggers of 1933 . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Sep 1951.
---
Daily Variety
31 Aug 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Sep 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 51
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Sep 51
p. 1005.
New York Times
30 Aug 51
p. 19.
New York Times
1 Sep 51
p. 9.
Variety
5 Sep 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Mus numbers staged and dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Gold Diggers by Avery Hopwood (New York, 30 Sep 1919).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Painting the Clouds with Sunshine" and "Tiptoe Through the Tulips," music and lyrics by Joe Burke and Al Dubin
"Man Is a Necessary Evil" and "The Mambo Man," music by Sonny Burke, lyrics by Jack Elliott
"Vienna Dreams," music by Rudolf Sieczynski, lyrics by Irving Caesar
+
SONGS
"Painting the Clouds with Sunshine" and "Tiptoe Through the Tulips," music and lyrics by Joe Burke and Al Dubin
"Man Is a Necessary Evil" and "The Mambo Man," music by Sonny Burke, lyrics by Jack Elliott
"Vienna Dreams," music by Rudolf Sieczynski, lyrics by Irving Caesar
"We're in the Money," music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Al Dubin
"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," music and lyrics by Ernest R. Ball, Chauncey Olcott and George Graff, Jr.
"With a Song in My Heart," music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart
"The Birth of the Blues," music and lyrics by Ray Henderson, B. G. DeSylva and Lew Brown
"You're My Everything," music and lyrics by Harry Warren, Mort Dixon and Joe Young
"Jalousie," music and lyrics by Jacob Gade and Vera Bloom
"I Like the Mountain Music," music and lyrics by Frank Weldon and James Cavanaugh.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Golddiggers in Las Vegas
Release Date:
10 October 1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 30 August 1951
Production Date:
26 January--mid April 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 October 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1213
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
86-87 or 90
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15125
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Carol, Abby and June, three comely, unrelated nightclub performers billed as the "Dillon Sisters," decide that Las Vegas, the site of their next gig, is an ideal spot for a manhunt. According to Carol, who is the most pragmatic of the three, the "right" man will be a millionaire, but Abby still pines for Vince Nichols, the singer she left behind in Hollywood because of his urge to gamble. June is sweet on dancer Ted Lansing, who has often performed with them, but it is for Abby, Ted declares, that he would stop breathing. The girls take their trailer to Las Vegas and settle in behind the Golden Egg, where they will be performing. The establishment, which is owned by "Uncle" Felix Hoff, has rapidly grown from a small hotel into a casino, but its success is threatened by the customers' frequent lucky gambling streaks. Felix anticipates financial relief when an eccentric prospector, Sam Parks, rides up on a donkey and expresses his interest in partnership. However, after demonstrating the menacing accuracy of his knife-throwing skill, Sam explains that he is the heir of Felix's former business partner, who was killed cheating in a poker game, and demands that Felix buy out his half of the Golden Egg for $75,000 within two weeks. Meanwhile, Ted, who has followed Abby to Las Vegas and has convinced Felix to hire him, promises Carol that he will bring three millionaires to their opening night performance and that evening, introduces two "sugar-daddies" to the girls. Abby, who is struggling with her decision to break up with Vince, goes out with Ted as a distraction and is amused, but disbelieving, when he tells her ... +


Carol, Abby and June, three comely, unrelated nightclub performers billed as the "Dillon Sisters," decide that Las Vegas, the site of their next gig, is an ideal spot for a manhunt. According to Carol, who is the most pragmatic of the three, the "right" man will be a millionaire, but Abby still pines for Vince Nichols, the singer she left behind in Hollywood because of his urge to gamble. June is sweet on dancer Ted Lansing, who has often performed with them, but it is for Abby, Ted declares, that he would stop breathing. The girls take their trailer to Las Vegas and settle in behind the Golden Egg, where they will be performing. The establishment, which is owned by "Uncle" Felix Hoff, has rapidly grown from a small hotel into a casino, but its success is threatened by the customers' frequent lucky gambling streaks. Felix anticipates financial relief when an eccentric prospector, Sam Parks, rides up on a donkey and expresses his interest in partnership. However, after demonstrating the menacing accuracy of his knife-throwing skill, Sam explains that he is the heir of Felix's former business partner, who was killed cheating in a poker game, and demands that Felix buy out his half of the Golden Egg for $75,000 within two weeks. Meanwhile, Ted, who has followed Abby to Las Vegas and has convinced Felix to hire him, promises Carol that he will bring three millionaires to their opening night performance and that evening, introduces two "sugar-daddies" to the girls. Abby, who is struggling with her decision to break up with Vince, goes out with Ted as a distraction and is amused, but disbelieving, when he tells her that he is the third millionaire. The next morning in the trailer, as truckloads of flowers are delivered to Abby, Carol tells Abby and June that she has learned that Ted is from a family of wealthy Boston bankers. Ted then shows up with another flower and an engagement ring, and though Abby wants time to think about his proposal, Carol makes her accept. Later, in Boston, at the board meeting of the Lansing National Bank, Ted's stiff cousin, Bennington Lansing, reads aloud a Variety review describing Abby as a "shapely canary," and announces his plans to go to Las Vegas to rescue Ted from the supposed gold digger. After learning about Bennington's impending arrival, Carol takes charge of transforming Felix's private suite into Eastern upper class stuffiness and coaches Abby and June to speak with Boston accents, hoping these superficial changes will convince Bennington of Abby's respectability. However, when Bennington arrives early, Carol mistakes him for the interior decorator and unwittingly reveals her plans to him. June sees Bennington pilfer Abby's signed photograph of Vince to use as evidence against her, and in a half-hearted defense of Abby, admits that Vince has just taken a singing gig in Las Vegas at the Bingo Club. After finding Vince, Bennington gives the crooner $5,000 for "expenses" to woo back Abby, then pretends that he has changed his mind about Abby by throwing a celebration at the Golden Egg to honor the engaged couple. Vince appears and though his and Abby's ardor is evident to all, especially the jealous Ted, Vince realizes that he wants what is best for Abby and decides to double-cross Bennington by gambling away the $5,000, which causes Abby to abandon Ted while she tries to talk Vince away from the gambling table. When June finds Ted alone at the slot machines and he coincidentally wins the jackpot, they decide to make the round of casinos together. Meanwhile, Carol encourages Bennington to imbibe, hoping that he will approve of a quickie marriage for Abby and Ted while in an altered state. After he offers to examine her tax returns, she takes him to the trailer to sleep it off, unaware that Sam has arranged to capture the moment on film. In the casino, Vince wins $75,027 with Bennington's $5000, but Abby orders him out of her life with conviction. Carol, however, who has returned in time to witness Abby's rejection of Vince, is unconvinced and tells him that Abby is more in love with him than ever. The next morning, Sam tries to blackmail the hungover Bennington with a compromising snapshot of him and Carol, but when Carol learns about it, she tears up the photo. Frustrated, Sam practices his knife throwing, while Felix watches in fear, keenly aware that the two-week deadline is approaching. Vince shows up and after listening to Sam's tale about the $75,000 owed him, gets Felix off the hook by paying Sam the money he won gambling. As the Las Vegas Helldorado festivities get under way, June and Ted, who have become engaged, happily lead the dancing, and after Ted lassoes Abby and hands her over to Vince, the erstwhile lovers reunite. Felix then arrives, and expresses his gratitude to Vince, his new partner at the Golden Egg, for saving his life. Bennington tells Carol that his drunken expressions of admiration the previous evening were sincere and proposes to her. Sam also joins their group, and they all climb into a buggy for the Helldorado parade. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.