Pals of the Golden West (1951)

67-68 mins | Western | 15 December 1951

Director:

William Witney

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Harold Minter

Production Designer:

Frank Hotaling

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

A 7 May 1951 HR news item reports that Jimmy Bryant , George Bamby, Bud Dooley , Michael Barton and Darol Rice were cast in the production. According to a Jan 1951 HR news item, they were members of the singing group, the Roy Rogers Riders. Pals of the Golden West marked Roy Rogers' final film with Republic, following an association that began in 1935. Rogers made over eighty films for the ... More Less

A 7 May 1951 HR news item reports that Jimmy Bryant , George Bamby, Bud Dooley , Michael Barton and Darol Rice were cast in the production. According to a Jan 1951 HR news item, they were members of the singing group, the Roy Rogers Riders. Pals of the Golden West marked Roy Rogers' final film with Republic, following an association that began in 1935. Rogers made over eighty films for the studio. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Jan 1952.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jan 52
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Jan 1952.
---
Variety
16 Jan 52
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Pals of the Golden West," words and music by Jack Elliott and Stanley Wilson
"You Never Know When Love May Come Along," words and music by Jack Elliott
"Slumber Trail," words by Aaron Gonzalez, music by Jack Elliott
+
SONGS
"Pals of the Golden West," words and music by Jack Elliott and Stanley Wilson
"You Never Know When Love May Come Along," words and music by Jack Elliott
"Slumber Trail," words by Aaron Gonzalez, music by Jack Elliott
"Beyond the Great Divide," words and music by Jordan Smith.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 December 1951
Production Date:
7 May--late May 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 September 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1404
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67-68
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15363
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Roy Rogers, troubleshooter for the U.S. border patrol, receives orders to prevent the spread of hoof-and-mouth disease from Mexico into the United States. At the border fence, Roy meets his friend Lopez, who has been transferred from Mexico to assist him. With them is Lopez' young son Pancho, who notices signs of a bear, a possible hoof-and-mouth carrier, that has climbed the fence. Roy's trained dog Bullet picks up the bear's trail, which doubles back toward Pancho. Roy kills the bear, but Pancho has been scratched, so Roy takes him to the doctor. Lopez, meanwhile, heads for the patrol camp at Borrasco, where sandstorms are heavy and frequent. On his way, he encounters Ward Sloan and Lucky Grillo, who are planning to herd cattle from Mexico over the border as soon as the winds pile sand against the fence to form a temporary bridge. By altering their cattle brands, they sell Lucky's Mexican herd as Sloan's at the higher, U.S. price. The profit far exceeds their other schemes, but they worry that the recent uproar over hoof-and-mouth disease could complicate their plans. While attempting to arrest them, Lopez recognizes Lucky as the murderer Jim Bradford. Sloan kills Lopez, and he and Lucky leave the body for the storm to bury. Later Sloan and one of Lucky's men, Tony, attend Col. Wells's Cattlemen's Association meeting in Capital City about the hoof-and-mouth problem. Concerned that their herds will be confiscated by the government if any diseased cattle are found, the ranchers are demanding action, and the colonel assures them Roy is working on the problem. Cathy Marsh, a journalist reporting on the disease, remains after ... +


Roy Rogers, troubleshooter for the U.S. border patrol, receives orders to prevent the spread of hoof-and-mouth disease from Mexico into the United States. At the border fence, Roy meets his friend Lopez, who has been transferred from Mexico to assist him. With them is Lopez' young son Pancho, who notices signs of a bear, a possible hoof-and-mouth carrier, that has climbed the fence. Roy's trained dog Bullet picks up the bear's trail, which doubles back toward Pancho. Roy kills the bear, but Pancho has been scratched, so Roy takes him to the doctor. Lopez, meanwhile, heads for the patrol camp at Borrasco, where sandstorms are heavy and frequent. On his way, he encounters Ward Sloan and Lucky Grillo, who are planning to herd cattle from Mexico over the border as soon as the winds pile sand against the fence to form a temporary bridge. By altering their cattle brands, they sell Lucky's Mexican herd as Sloan's at the higher, U.S. price. The profit far exceeds their other schemes, but they worry that the recent uproar over hoof-and-mouth disease could complicate their plans. While attempting to arrest them, Lopez recognizes Lucky as the murderer Jim Bradford. Sloan kills Lopez, and he and Lucky leave the body for the storm to bury. Later Sloan and one of Lucky's men, Tony, attend Col. Wells's Cattlemen's Association meeting in Capital City about the hoof-and-mouth problem. Concerned that their herds will be confiscated by the government if any diseased cattle are found, the ranchers are demanding action, and the colonel assures them Roy is working on the problem. Cathy Marsh, a journalist reporting on the disease, remains after the meeting and eavesdrops as the colonel gives Roy, who has arrived for an appointment, three weeks to find answers. She has arranged with Elena Madera of the Borrasco freight office to use desk space there, and when she arrives from Capital City, Elena's assistant and would-be wooer, Pinky, takes a photograph of Cathy and inadvertently captures Sloan and Tony talking in the background. The two outlaws fear the picture might later incriminate them, so they fight Pinky to break the photographic plate and destroy the evidence. Roy jumps in to assist Pinky, but gets blamed by Elena for the camera's damage. Ignoring Roy's advice to wait for the real story, Cathy prints a sensationalized story that ends with Roy's involvement in a street brawl. In the meantime, Sloan reports to Lucky that an expert tracker has been assigned to the hoof-and-mouth problem. Lucky and Sloan decide to make one big transfer of cattle, then lay low for a while. Near the border fence, Roy and Pat, another patrolman, are looking for Lopez, and see Tony and two others recovering Lopez' body. During the fight, Pat shoots one man and Roy captures Tony, but the third man gets away. Later, Cathy wants to write another news story, but again Roy begs her to wait until Pancho can be told about his father's death. Pancho's anxiety has turned into nightmares, and he goes out with Bullet to search for his father. Lucky, on his way to see Sloan, finds Pancho and takes him as hostage to Sloan's ranch, where the men are leaving for the border to bring in the herd. At the jail, Pinky recognizes Tony from the fight over the camera, and he and Roy see the link to Sloan when they print the photograph. They ride to Sloan's ranch and defeat the few remaining men, but in the skirmish Sloan is killed. Pancho and Bullet are sent for help, but are pursued by Tony, who has been freed by Cathy and Elena in response to a hostage note from Lucky and Sloan requesting a trade of Tony for Pancho. Tony intends to kill Pancho, but is himself killed by a bear. Pancho and Bullet find Pat, who rounds up the patrolmen. They arrive at the border in time to help Roy and Pinky arrest the smugglers and reroute the cattle to Mexico. Afterward, Roy and his cohorts gather at the camp. Cathy, who has just made her biggest scoop ever, agrees to get Pancho to school, and he promises to study hard, while Roy rides off to his new assignment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.