Valley of Fire (1951)

62-63 mins | Western | November 1951

Director:

John English

Producer:

Armand Schaefer

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

James Sweeney

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Gene Autry Productions
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HISTORY

Although the information in the copyright files indicate the film was released in sepia, the film viewed was in black and ... More Less

Although the information in the copyright files indicate the film was released in sepia, the film viewed was in black and white. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Nov 1951.
---
Daily Variety
7 Nov 1951.
---
Film Daily
19 Nov 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 51
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Nov 51
pp. 1102-03.
Variety
7 Nov 51
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Here's to the Ladies," words and music by Gene Autry and Cindy Walker
"On Top of Old Smoky," words and music based on the traditional folksong "Little Mohee."
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1951
Production Date:
5 June--15 June 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Gene Autry Productions
Copyright Date:
8 October 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1232
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
sepia
Duration(in mins):
62-63
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15436
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When the first election in the frontier mining town of Quartz Creek is interrupted by ruffians stealing the ballot box, saloon owner Tod Rawlings and bar hostess Bee Laverne look on in amusement. Gene Autry, a candidate for mayor sponsored by businessman Grady McKean, follows the thieves and recovers the ballot box. As Gene returns to town, the local stage, owned and run by Grady, pulls in with dandy Steve Guilford driving. Steve reports that the stage was held up in Indian Gulch, the driver murdered and $72,000 in gold stolen. After the ballots are counted, Gene is declared mayor and appoints his friend, Breezie Larrabee, as marshal. Gene promises peace and civilization for Quartz Creek and announces plans to bring eligible brides for the miners on a special wagon train. While the town prepares for the women's arrival, Breezie admits to Gene that he sold Steve part of his land share, which he now suspects may have gold on it, as Steve is regularly cashing in gold dust. Breezie also suspects that Steve might have lied about the stagecoach robbery and stolen the gold himself. Meanwhile, Rawlings who cashes in gold from the miners at the saloon, usually at a lower rate than the bank's, shoots and wounds a drunken old miner who accuses him of theft. After Gene closes down the saloon and orders Rawlings out of town, Rawlings and Bee grudgingly move on to Indian Gulch. Upon his arrival there, Rawlings hatches a scheme to sell the prospective brides to the Indian Gulch men by diverting the wagon train. Rawlings fakes Indian war drums to panic the approaching wagons and sends out ... +


When the first election in the frontier mining town of Quartz Creek is interrupted by ruffians stealing the ballot box, saloon owner Tod Rawlings and bar hostess Bee Laverne look on in amusement. Gene Autry, a candidate for mayor sponsored by businessman Grady McKean, follows the thieves and recovers the ballot box. As Gene returns to town, the local stage, owned and run by Grady, pulls in with dandy Steve Guilford driving. Steve reports that the stage was held up in Indian Gulch, the driver murdered and $72,000 in gold stolen. After the ballots are counted, Gene is declared mayor and appoints his friend, Breezie Larrabee, as marshal. Gene promises peace and civilization for Quartz Creek and announces plans to bring eligible brides for the miners on a special wagon train. While the town prepares for the women's arrival, Breezie admits to Gene that he sold Steve part of his land share, which he now suspects may have gold on it, as Steve is regularly cashing in gold dust. Breezie also suspects that Steve might have lied about the stagecoach robbery and stolen the gold himself. Meanwhile, Rawlings who cashes in gold from the miners at the saloon, usually at a lower rate than the bank's, shoots and wounds a drunken old miner who accuses him of theft. After Gene closes down the saloon and orders Rawlings out of town, Rawlings and Bee grudgingly move on to Indian Gulch. Upon his arrival there, Rawlings hatches a scheme to sell the prospective brides to the Indian Gulch men by diverting the wagon train. Rawlings fakes Indian war drums to panic the approaching wagons and sends out an escort to guide them to Indian Gulch. Back in Quartz Creek, the men have already decorated the main street and dressed up to welcome the women, when Gene and Breezie realize the wagon train has been delayed. Gene takes several men in search of the women and upon discovering them headed toward Indian Gulch, redirects them to Quartz Creek. Two men from Indian Gulch, doubtful of Rawlings' plans, slip into Quartz Creek to spy on the women's reception. The women, including flinty gold digger Laurie and Widow Blanche and her prankish young son Virgil, are dismayed by the rustic nature of the town. When Laurie notices Steve in a new rig, she immediately flirts with him, while Blanche is attracted to Breezie. Soon after, Steve takes Laurie out to his property, and Gene and Breezie follow to determine whether he has discovered gold. Steve assures Laurie he will always have money and, unaware that Gene and Breezie are watching, uncovers several bags of the McKean Express gold. Back in town, as Steve buys Laurie an expensive engagement ring, Gene arrests him for the stagecoach theft. After the Indian Gulch men return to Rawlings and report that the residents of Quartz Creek are planning a dance to welcome the women to town, Rawlings decides to seize the women during the festivities. At the jail, Virgil distracts Breezie, allowing Laurie to take his keys and free Steve from his cell. Gene learns of Rawlings' kidnapping plan from one of the townsmen's relatives in Indian Gulch and that evening at the dance, after the Quartz Creek men check their guns outside the dance hall, Rawlings' men steal them. As Steve and Laurie head out of town, they run into Rawlings, who asks Steve to join him in the attack on the town. Bee, a longtime acquaintance of Steve, advises Laurie against leaving with him and Laurie stays behind. When Rawlings and Steve arrive, the attack begins, but the Indian Gulch men discover the guns have been rigged to misfire. Rawlings tries to flee, but Breezie captures him. Wounded, Steve uses Laurie as a shield and escapes in a stage coach, with Gene in pursuit. After a lengthy chase, Gene catches the stage, and before dying, Steve tells Laurie she is better off without him. With the outlaws subdued, peace comes to Quartz Creek. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.