The Kid from Broken Gun (1952)

55-56 mins | Western | August 1952

Director:

Fred F. Sears

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

Fayte Browne

Editor:

Paul Borofsky

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The Kid from Broken Gun was the last film in the long-running Western series "The Durango Kid." For additional information on the series, please see the entry for The Return of the Durango Kid in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and consult the Series Index. ... More Less

The Kid from Broken Gun was the last film in the long-running Western series "The Durango Kid." For additional information on the series, please see the entry for The Return of the Durango Kid in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and consult the Series Index. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Aug 1952.
---
Daily Variety
8 Aug 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Aug 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 1952
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Aug 52
p. 1485.
Variety
13 Aug 52
p. 6.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
August 1952
Production Date:
31 March--4 April 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 August 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1863
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55-56
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15960
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1875 New Mexico, Jack Mahoney stands trial for the murder of Matt Fallon. Jack is accused of committing the murder in a fit of jealousy over Fallon’s attentions to Jack’s girl friend, Gail Kingston. Gail, an attorney, defends Jack at his trial, but cannot contest prosecuting attorney Kiefer’s assertion that Jack has a history of an uncontrollable temper. Kiefer reveals to the jury that Jack was as a boxer nicknamed “The Kid from Broken Gun,” and was forced to retire because of his “killer instinct.” Jack’s longtime friend, Steve Reynolds, whose alter ego is The Durango Kid, comes to Jack’s aid and testifies to Jack’s good character. Later, along with the affable Smiley Burnette, Steve investigates and learns that Jack’s dilemma can be traced to a stagecoach strongbox full of gold stored at the Express office under the protection of Doc Handy. Jack admits to going to the express office to confront Fallon about Gail, but swears to Steve that he did not commit the murder. When Steve attempts to have Doc testify in court about the origins of the strongbox, however, Doc is shot and killed through a courtroom window. The assailant is not captured, and without further evidence to support Jack’s claim of innocence, the jury convicts him and he is sentenced to be hanged. Continuing his inquiry in secret, Steve soon unearths a plot headed by Gail to frame Jack for Fallon’s murder, which she committed to get the gold. To eliminate any possible connection with her, Gail orders two of her three henchman to sneak into the jail and kill Jack. ... +


In 1875 New Mexico, Jack Mahoney stands trial for the murder of Matt Fallon. Jack is accused of committing the murder in a fit of jealousy over Fallon’s attentions to Jack’s girl friend, Gail Kingston. Gail, an attorney, defends Jack at his trial, but cannot contest prosecuting attorney Kiefer’s assertion that Jack has a history of an uncontrollable temper. Kiefer reveals to the jury that Jack was as a boxer nicknamed “The Kid from Broken Gun,” and was forced to retire because of his “killer instinct.” Jack’s longtime friend, Steve Reynolds, whose alter ego is The Durango Kid, comes to Jack’s aid and testifies to Jack’s good character. Later, along with the affable Smiley Burnette, Steve investigates and learns that Jack’s dilemma can be traced to a stagecoach strongbox full of gold stored at the Express office under the protection of Doc Handy. Jack admits to going to the express office to confront Fallon about Gail, but swears to Steve that he did not commit the murder. When Steve attempts to have Doc testify in court about the origins of the strongbox, however, Doc is shot and killed through a courtroom window. The assailant is not captured, and without further evidence to support Jack’s claim of innocence, the jury convicts him and he is sentenced to be hanged. Continuing his inquiry in secret, Steve soon unearths a plot headed by Gail to frame Jack for Fallon’s murder, which she committed to get the gold. To eliminate any possible connection with her, Gail orders two of her three henchman to sneak into the jail and kill Jack. Although the outlaws capture the sheriff, he and Jack are saved by the intervention of The Durango Kid. With Smiley’s assistance, Durango then forces the judge and jury to reconvene. After Durango proves Gail’s guilt, Jack is set free. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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