Old Oklahoma Plains (1952)

59-60 mins | Western | 25 July 1952

Director:

William Witney

Cinematographer:

John MacBurnie

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Frank Hotaling

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Although his appearance in the film has not been confirmed, a Mar 1952 HR news item adds Joel Marston to the cast. A modern source adds Chick Hannon to the cast. A HR production chart lists Dick Tyler as sound man, but he is not credited onscreen and his contribution to the film has not been determined. According to a modern source, stock footage from Republic's 1938 production Army Girl (see above) was used in the race sequence. ... More Less

Although his appearance in the film has not been confirmed, a Mar 1952 HR news item adds Joel Marston to the cast. A modern source adds Chick Hannon to the cast. A HR production chart lists Dick Tyler as sound man, but he is not credited onscreen and his contribution to the film has not been determined. According to a modern source, stock footage from Republic's 1938 production Army Girl (see above) was used in the race sequence.

More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Aug 1952.
---
Daily Variety
13 Aug 52
p. 4.
Film Daily
4 Sep 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Aug 52
p. 1503.
Variety
20 Aug 52
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Lonesome Road," traditional, arranged by Dorothy Scarborough
"The Old Chisholm Trail" and "Dese Bones," traditional.
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 July 1952
Production Date:
10 March--late March 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 July 1952
Copyright Number:
LP2121
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
59-60
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15856
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1926, the U.S. Cavalry is planning maneuvers to test the efficiency of tanks against horsemen. Rex Allen, an ex-Cavalry man turned rodeo performer, has been asked by Col. Charles Bigelow to herd the cattle from nearby ranches off a free-range pasture owned by the government to clear it for testing. The uncooperative ranchers, who fear the permanent loss of free grazing land, are being agitated by Chuck Ramsey, an embittered Army veteran who was court-martialed for gambling and insubordination. Secretly manipulating Chuck is Arthur Jensen, whose family fortune was made selling horses to the Army. Rex and his men report to Bigelow, where Rex meets Lt. Spike Conners, the mechanic who is assisting Bigelow, and Spike's sweetheart, Terry Ramsey, who is concerned about her brother Chuck's gambling fever. Terry invites Rex to a meeting of the ranchers hosted by Chuck at the Ramsey ranch, but Chuck inflames the ranchers so that when Spike, Rex and his assistant, Slim Pickens, arrive, the ranchers beat them up. Terry tries to shame Chuck for his part in the brutality, but he accuses her of selling out the ranchers because of her romance with Spike. Though injured, Rex and his assistants begin herding the stock off the government pasture, while Jensen and Chuck make plans to sabotage the tests. On the day of the maneuvers, Chuck and Nat Cameron, an employee of Jensen, boobytrap the area with explosives. As important Army officials watch, the maneuvers, which are designed as a race between a tank driven by Spike and a troop of Cavalrymen, crossing flat areas, rock barriers and water, begin. When confronted with a barbed wire fence, the horsemen ... +


In 1926, the U.S. Cavalry is planning maneuvers to test the efficiency of tanks against horsemen. Rex Allen, an ex-Cavalry man turned rodeo performer, has been asked by Col. Charles Bigelow to herd the cattle from nearby ranches off a free-range pasture owned by the government to clear it for testing. The uncooperative ranchers, who fear the permanent loss of free grazing land, are being agitated by Chuck Ramsey, an embittered Army veteran who was court-martialed for gambling and insubordination. Secretly manipulating Chuck is Arthur Jensen, whose family fortune was made selling horses to the Army. Rex and his men report to Bigelow, where Rex meets Lt. Spike Conners, the mechanic who is assisting Bigelow, and Spike's sweetheart, Terry Ramsey, who is concerned about her brother Chuck's gambling fever. Terry invites Rex to a meeting of the ranchers hosted by Chuck at the Ramsey ranch, but Chuck inflames the ranchers so that when Spike, Rex and his assistant, Slim Pickens, arrive, the ranchers beat them up. Terry tries to shame Chuck for his part in the brutality, but he accuses her of selling out the ranchers because of her romance with Spike. Though injured, Rex and his assistants begin herding the stock off the government pasture, while Jensen and Chuck make plans to sabotage the tests. On the day of the maneuvers, Chuck and Nat Cameron, an employee of Jensen, boobytrap the area with explosives. As important Army officials watch, the maneuvers, which are designed as a race between a tank driven by Spike and a troop of Cavalrymen, crossing flat areas, rock barriers and water, begin. When confronted with a barbed wire fence, the horsemen dismount to pull it down, but the tank barrels through it and takes the lead. Rex, who is watching the race from a distance through binoculars, spots some men moving the flag markers and changing the race course. Sensing trouble, he and Slim ride out to warn Spike, but the tank explodes. Bigelow, who is Spike's passenger, is injured, while Spike dies instantly. At Spike's military funeral, Terry tells Rex that she is selling her part of the ranch to Chuck, but Rex asks her to delay because he suspects Spike's death was not an accident. Bigelow's supervisors, believing the explosion was due to mechanical failure, order him to close the testing site and chastise him for wasting time, money and personnel. Rex, who is unable to find the men who moved the flags, shows Bigelow a casing for dynamite found in the wreckage, and says that he believes it is the kind of explosive ranchers use for blowing up tree stumps. Bigelow, risking court-martial, gives Rex permission to move the repaired tank to the Ramsey ranch and try to find Spike's killer. Outside a nearby casino, Chuck reports to Jensen that the Army is moving out and asks for his payoff. Slim shows up, and feigning drunkenness, tells the ranchers there that new tests are being planned for the tank, which is now in the Ramsey barn. When Rex and his men overhear Jensen urging the ranchers to "take care of Rex and Bigelow," Rex sends Slim to hide the tank and tells the disbelieving ranchers that the tank was sabotaged. When the ranchers are unmoved by his plea for patriotism and try again to gang up on Rex, Rex's men hold them back, so that Rex beats Cameron in a fair fight. By then, Chuck and Jensen have slipped away and, with Jensen's henchmen, storm the Ramsey barn. Though Terry tries to intervene, a gunfight erupts between Slim and the ranchers, and Jensen orders Chuck to enter through the back. Rex and his men ride up and the shootout continues. Chuck, who is realizing it has gone too far, wants to give up. At gunpoint, he is forced into the tank with Jensen and told to drive it out of the barn. Rex chases on horseback, but the tank tumbles sideways down a hill, and Jensen is killed. With his dying breath, Chuck expresses regret for his traitorous activities, after which Rex's men apprehend Jensen's henchmen. The tank is repaired, and Bigelow, who is given permission to continue the testing, finds alternate grazing land for the ranchers. Having completed their task, Rex rides away, followed by Slim. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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