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HISTORY

According to a Feb 1937 news item in HR , the film's early title was Careless Rapture . According to news items in LAEx , Marlene Dietrich was originally to have starred in this picture, with Fritz Lang directing. A later item in LAEx notes that Ray Milland was considered for the male lead opposite Claudette Colbert. A Jan 1939 item in HR adds that the production was divided into two units in order to insure that it would be completed in time to permit Don Ameche to star in The Story of Alexander Graham Bell . Mitchell Leisen directed the first unit while Hal Walker directed the second. Modern sources state that Barbara Stanwyck was also slated for the female lead, but previous commitments forced her to withdraw. Modern sources add the following names to the cast: William Eddritt, Michael Visaroff and Joseph Romantini (Footmen), Carlos De Valdez (Butler), Joseph De Stefani (Head porter), Arno Frey (Room clerk), Eugene Borden (First porter), Paul Bryar (Second porter), Leonard Sues (Bellboy), Robert Graves (Doorman), Eddy Conrad (Prince Potopienko), Elspeth Dudgeon (Dowager), Helen St. Rayner (Coloratura), Billy Daniels (Roger), Bryant Washburn (Guest) and Max Lucke ... More Less

According to a Feb 1937 news item in HR , the film's early title was Careless Rapture . According to news items in LAEx , Marlene Dietrich was originally to have starred in this picture, with Fritz Lang directing. A later item in LAEx notes that Ray Milland was considered for the male lead opposite Claudette Colbert. A Jan 1939 item in HR adds that the production was divided into two units in order to insure that it would be completed in time to permit Don Ameche to star in The Story of Alexander Graham Bell . Mitchell Leisen directed the first unit while Hal Walker directed the second. Modern sources state that Barbara Stanwyck was also slated for the female lead, but previous commitments forced her to withdraw. Modern sources add the following names to the cast: William Eddritt, Michael Visaroff and Joseph Romantini (Footmen), Carlos De Valdez (Butler), Joseph De Stefani (Head porter), Arno Frey (Room clerk), Eugene Borden (First porter), Paul Bryar (Second porter), Leonard Sues (Bellboy), Robert Graves (Doorman), Eddy Conrad (Prince Potopienko), Elspeth Dudgeon (Dowager), Helen St. Rayner (Coloratura), Billy Daniels (Roger), Bryant Washburn (Guest) and Max Lucke (Lawyer). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Mar 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Mar 39
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 37
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 38
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 39
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 39
p. 2.
Los Angeles Examiner
10 Jun 1937.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
10 Oct 1938.
---
Motion Picture Daily
14 Mar 39
p. 1, 15
Motion Picture Herald
24 Dec 38
p. 36.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Jan 39
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Mar 39
p. 48.
New York Times
6 Apr 39
p. 31.
Variety
15 Mar 39
p. 16.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Careless Rapture
Release Date:
24 March 1939
Production Date:
mid November 1938--mid January 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 March 1939
Copyright Number:
LP8737
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
94
Length(in feet):
8,429
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4906
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

American showgirl Eve Peabody finds herself stranded penniless in Paris on a rainy night, her only possession the evening gown on her back. Eve strikes a bargain with soft-hearted cab driver Tibor Czerny to double his fee in exchange for driving her from nightclub to nightclub looking for a job. When Tibor begins to fall in love with her, Eve, seeking a limousine instead of a taxi, runs away from him and, passing off a pawn ticket as an invitation, crashes a charity concert and attracts the attention of the prankish yet practical millionaire Georges Flammarion. Her Cinderella adventures begin when Georges hatches a scheme to deflect the attentions of handsome philanderer Jacques Picot away from Georges' willful wife Helene and toward Eve. After Georges bestows upon her the title of the Baroness Czerny, the puzzled Eve finds herself the recipient of rooms at the Ritz, trunkloads of clothes and a chauffeured limousine. Soon after, Georges, her fairy godfather, appears at the Ritz to offer Eve the job of decoying Jacques away from Helen, and she accepts his weekend invitation to the Flammarion country estate. Meanwhile, Tibor has organized the cab drivers of Paris to find Eve and, on a tip, traces her to the Flammarion chateau. Just as Helen is about to expose as Eve as an imposter, Tibor arrives as the Baron to claim his wife. Rejected once again by Eve, Tibor is on the verge of unmasking her real identity when she cleverly checkmates him by announcing that her husband is insane. Consequently, no one believes Tibor when he proclaims that he is a taxi driver and Eve, a showgirl. Tibor's ... +


American showgirl Eve Peabody finds herself stranded penniless in Paris on a rainy night, her only possession the evening gown on her back. Eve strikes a bargain with soft-hearted cab driver Tibor Czerny to double his fee in exchange for driving her from nightclub to nightclub looking for a job. When Tibor begins to fall in love with her, Eve, seeking a limousine instead of a taxi, runs away from him and, passing off a pawn ticket as an invitation, crashes a charity concert and attracts the attention of the prankish yet practical millionaire Georges Flammarion. Her Cinderella adventures begin when Georges hatches a scheme to deflect the attentions of handsome philanderer Jacques Picot away from Georges' willful wife Helene and toward Eve. After Georges bestows upon her the title of the Baroness Czerny, the puzzled Eve finds herself the recipient of rooms at the Ritz, trunkloads of clothes and a chauffeured limousine. Soon after, Georges, her fairy godfather, appears at the Ritz to offer Eve the job of decoying Jacques away from Helen, and she accepts his weekend invitation to the Flammarion country estate. Meanwhile, Tibor has organized the cab drivers of Paris to find Eve and, on a tip, traces her to the Flammarion chateau. Just as Helen is about to expose as Eve as an imposter, Tibor arrives as the Baron to claim his wife. Rejected once again by Eve, Tibor is on the verge of unmasking her real identity when she cleverly checkmates him by announcing that her husband is insane. Consequently, no one believes Tibor when he proclaims that he is a taxi driver and Eve, a showgirl. Tibor's outburst causes the sympathetic Jacques to propose to Eve, but before she can marry, she must "divorce" Tibor. When the jury refuses a divorce on the grounds of Tibor's insanity, Eve realizes that she loves him and marches off to the marriage license bureau with him as Georges marches off with Helene on his arm. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.