Storm over Tibet (1952)

87 mins | Drama | July 1952

Director:

Andrew Marton

Writers:

Ivan Tors, Sam Meyer

Producers:

Ivan Tors, Laslo Benedek

Cinematographers:

George Diskant, Richard Angst

Editor:

John Hoffman

Production Designer:

George Van Marter

Production Company:

Summit Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Mask of the Himalayas . The following written prologue appears in the onscreen credits: "The outdoor scenes of this picture were filmed in the Karakoram region of the Himalayas at altitudes ranging up to 24,000 feet when these mountains were explored for the first time by the International Himalaya Expedition under the leadership of Prof. G. O. Dyrenforth of Switzerland. The ritual dances were photographed at the Buddhist Monastery of Lamayuru."
       Jan 1951 news items indicate that director Andrew Marton photographed the Himalayan sequences featuring his wife, Jarmila Marton, during an expedition in 1936. Much of Marton's Himalayan footage was used in the 1936 Swiss production, Demon of the Himalayas , which was never released in the United States. Marton, who was borrowed from M-G-M, acquired the negative of the Swiss film and two additional reels of previously unused footage for Storm over Tibet . Jarmila Marton was the only cast member from the original 1936 footage available for the filming of Storm over Tibet . Portions of the 1951 footage were shot at General Service Studios in Hollywood.
       According to the HR review, Harald Dyrenforth enacted the role originally performed by his father, Norman Dyrenforth, who led the 1936 expedition. A Jan 1951 Var news item reveals that the original musical score for Demon of the Himalayas by Arthur Honegger was used for Storm over Tibet . In Jan 1951 a NYT item indicated that Norman Corwin contributed to a screenplay, but the extent of his contribution to the final film, if any, ... More Less

The working title of this film was Mask of the Himalayas . The following written prologue appears in the onscreen credits: "The outdoor scenes of this picture were filmed in the Karakoram region of the Himalayas at altitudes ranging up to 24,000 feet when these mountains were explored for the first time by the International Himalaya Expedition under the leadership of Prof. G. O. Dyrenforth of Switzerland. The ritual dances were photographed at the Buddhist Monastery of Lamayuru."
       Jan 1951 news items indicate that director Andrew Marton photographed the Himalayan sequences featuring his wife, Jarmila Marton, during an expedition in 1936. Much of Marton's Himalayan footage was used in the 1936 Swiss production, Demon of the Himalayas , which was never released in the United States. Marton, who was borrowed from M-G-M, acquired the negative of the Swiss film and two additional reels of previously unused footage for Storm over Tibet . Jarmila Marton was the only cast member from the original 1936 footage available for the filming of Storm over Tibet . Portions of the 1951 footage were shot at General Service Studios in Hollywood.
       According to the HR review, Harald Dyrenforth enacted the role originally performed by his father, Norman Dyrenforth, who led the 1936 expedition. A Jan 1951 Var news item reveals that the original musical score for Demon of the Himalayas by Arthur Honegger was used for Storm over Tibet . In Jan 1951 a NYT item indicated that Norman Corwin contributed to a screenplay, but the extent of his contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. An undated, but contemporary, news item in the production file on the film in the AMPAS Library announced that Dr. Douglas H. Schneider, head of Mass Communications for UNESCO would serve as technical advisor for the film, but his contribution to the completed picture has not been confirmed. The same item announced that Philip Friend would play the role of a scientist, but his appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. Although the character of "David Simms" appears to be the sole survivor of the avalanche at the story's end, the film does not actually show the other members of the expedition meeting their deaths. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Mar 51
pp. 90-91, 118.
Box Office
5 Jan 1952.
---
Daily Variety
19 Dec 51
p. 6.
Film Daily
21 Jan 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 51
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 51
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Dec 51
p. 1169.
New York Times
21 Jan 1951.
---
Variety
17 Jan 1951.
---
Variety
19 Dec 51
p. 6.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mask of the Himalayas
Release Date:
July 1952
Production Date:
mid Jan--early Feb 1951 at General Service Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1395
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Re-Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15225
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

High in the Himalayas, a lone figure, David Simms, stumbles down a snow-packed mountain and collapses outside a small Tibetan village. The local natives carry Dave, an American, into a temple, where he revives and, looking upon the altar, recalls his long journey there: At the end of World War II, Dave, an Army captain, pilots an Operation Hump airlift flight, transporting food and materials from China to India along the outskirts of Tibet. Dave anticipates returning stateside upon completion of his seventy-fifth mission and confides in fellow pilot and roommate Bill March that he stole an ancient Buddhist mask from a nearby temple for a souvenir. Dismayed, Bill tries to talk Dave out of taking the mask, and when the two men struggle over the antique, Dave severely cuts his hand on a shattered picture frame. Dave takes his belongings and the mask and reports for his flight, but his co-pilot reports Dave's bleeding hand and Dave is replaced by Bill. Later Dave visits the flight tower to send a message to Bill to return his belongings and hears Bill report the breakdown of his compass. When Dave plots Bill's position, he discovers the plane is flying directly into the Himalayan mountains of Amne Mandu at a low altitude. Despite frantic warnings, Dave and the others hear Bill's plane crash. Troubled, Dave visits the temple from which he stole the mask and offers to make reparations, but the temple priest refuses, indicating that repayment has already been made. With increasing guilt over Bill's death, Dave completes his final mission and returns home. Over the next few years, Dave continues feeling that he ... +


High in the Himalayas, a lone figure, David Simms, stumbles down a snow-packed mountain and collapses outside a small Tibetan village. The local natives carry Dave, an American, into a temple, where he revives and, looking upon the altar, recalls his long journey there: At the end of World War II, Dave, an Army captain, pilots an Operation Hump airlift flight, transporting food and materials from China to India along the outskirts of Tibet. Dave anticipates returning stateside upon completion of his seventy-fifth mission and confides in fellow pilot and roommate Bill March that he stole an ancient Buddhist mask from a nearby temple for a souvenir. Dismayed, Bill tries to talk Dave out of taking the mask, and when the two men struggle over the antique, Dave severely cuts his hand on a shattered picture frame. Dave takes his belongings and the mask and reports for his flight, but his co-pilot reports Dave's bleeding hand and Dave is replaced by Bill. Later Dave visits the flight tower to send a message to Bill to return his belongings and hears Bill report the breakdown of his compass. When Dave plots Bill's position, he discovers the plane is flying directly into the Himalayan mountains of Amne Mandu at a low altitude. Despite frantic warnings, Dave and the others hear Bill's plane crash. Troubled, Dave visits the temple from which he stole the mask and offers to make reparations, but the temple priest refuses, indicating that repayment has already been made. With increasing guilt over Bill's death, Dave completes his final mission and returns home. Over the next few years, Dave continues feeling that he is living a borrowed life and is finally driven to visit Bill's widow Elaine. Elaine is grateful for the visit and after several friendly calls, the two begin dating. Although fearful of Elaine's rejection, Dave tells her about Bill being a last minute replacement for him, but Elaine reassures him that Bill's death was accidental. Dave and Elaine fall in love, marry and settle into a happy life. One day they receive a mysterious package, which contains the Tibetan mask. Dave and Elaine wonder if Bill somehow survived the crash, and for a long period the mask haunts them. Dave then decides he must return the mask to Tibet, and Elaine insists on accompanying him. With difficulty the couple persuades UNESCO to give them permits to travel with a Himalayan expedition. Selling all their belongings, Dave and Elaine travel to India, where UN representative Philip Malloy introduces them to Prof. Faber and his wife Jarmila, heads of the expedition. As the expedition proceeds into the snow and biting winds of Tibet, Elaine has difficulty with the increasing altitude. The group eventually rests at a Tibetan monastery, and during a religious ceremony, Dave experiences a vision of an avalanche and the death of several people. Elaine pleads with Dave not to continue on the final part of the expedition but remain with her and Jarmila at the monastery. Dave is granted an audience with the High Lama, who cautions him that the god Sindja is against the expedition and wonders about Dave's real motives for making the journey. When Dave returns to Elaine, he insists on continuing. The men and several porters depart the following day and begin the arduous scaling of the steep mountain face. Without warning a rock slide hits the group, but fortunately no one is injured. The next morning, however, the porters refuse to go on, believing that the slide was a sign from Sindja. Farber promises to increase the men's salaries and order is restored. Unknown to Farber and the others, one native empties the supply of kerosene, replacing it with water. When he is spotted by a porter, the native beats the porter, who flees, terrified. The expedition proceeds, and only while setting up camp at the top of another perilous ridge, do the men discover the loss of the kerosene. Back at the base camp near the monastery, Elaine consults the High Lama, who advises her that Dave must find personal release through his journey. Meanwhile, the beaten porter returns to inform Jarmila of the sabotaged kerosene and she immediately forms a rescue party, but refuses to allow Elaine to come along due to her trouble with high altitude. In two days Jarmila and her men reach Faber and Dave's group, but she and several men remain behind when the final climb resumes. Midway up the last mountain, the men are stopped by a gale, preventing Jarmila from sending supplies for two days. When the weather lifts, the sabotage native attempts to stop Jarmila from departing with the supplies, but he is attacked by the other porters and falls to his death from a cliff. Jarmila and the porters reach Faber's group and all continue the climb. At the base of Amne Mandu, with the Fabers' blessings, Dave, Philip and Mike Aylen continue to the top, where they believe the plane's wreckage lies. At the top a sudden storm blows Philip and Mike off a precipice and their rope breaks, dropping them to their deaths. Stunned, Dave calls to Sindja to acknowledge him and an avalanche ensues, covering the entire top of the mountain. Dazed, Dave stumbles down the mountain and is carried into the temple. In the present, Elaine finds Dave in the temple, freed of his guilt over Bill's death and convinced that he was meant to live. The High Lama reveals that he sent Dave the mask, hoping to provide him with the peace that Dave and Elaine have at last found. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.