Young Man With Ideas (1952)

84 mins | Comedy-drama | 2 May 1952

Director:

Mitchell Leisen

Writer:

Arthur Sheekman

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Arthur Lonergan

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The film’s working titles were Young Man in a Hurry and The Family Man . According to HR news items, Gottfried Reinhardt received co-producing credit with William Wright because of the preparation work he did on the film before being reassigned to another M-G-M picture, Invitation . Other news items include Rodney Bell, Dora Sayers, Jack Gargan, Jean Acker, Margaret Farrell, Harry Cody, Helen Dickson, Jean Charney, Ruth Whitney and John Albans in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Will Wright was also included in one casting news item, but he was not in the released film.
       According to various news items in HR and LADN , when the film began production, the actor portraying the main character, "Maxwell Webster," was Russell Nype. Nype, who was on a leave of absence from the successful Irving Berlin-scored Broadway musical Call Me Madam , was also to sing a song in the film. After ten to twelve days of production, Nype was removed from the film due to disagreements over how the character should be portrayed. Glenn Ford replaced Nype and much of the initial footage had to be re-shot. Nype returned to Call Me Madam and did not appear in another film until 1970, when he had a role in Love Story (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ). Although actress Elsa Lanchester is listed on the CBCS as "Mme. Johnson," neither she nor that role were in the released film. Young Man with Ideas was director Mitchell ... More Less

The film’s working titles were Young Man in a Hurry and The Family Man . According to HR news items, Gottfried Reinhardt received co-producing credit with William Wright because of the preparation work he did on the film before being reassigned to another M-G-M picture, Invitation . Other news items include Rodney Bell, Dora Sayers, Jack Gargan, Jean Acker, Margaret Farrell, Harry Cody, Helen Dickson, Jean Charney, Ruth Whitney and John Albans in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Will Wright was also included in one casting news item, but he was not in the released film.
       According to various news items in HR and LADN , when the film began production, the actor portraying the main character, "Maxwell Webster," was Russell Nype. Nype, who was on a leave of absence from the successful Irving Berlin-scored Broadway musical Call Me Madam , was also to sing a song in the film. After ten to twelve days of production, Nype was removed from the film due to disagreements over how the character should be portrayed. Glenn Ford replaced Nype and much of the initial footage had to be re-shot. Nype returned to Call Me Madam and did not appear in another film until 1970, when he had a role in Love Story (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ). Although actress Elsa Lanchester is listed on the CBCS as "Mme. Johnson," neither she nor that role were in the released film. Young Man with Ideas was director Mitchell Leisen’s first M-G-M film since The Squaw Man (1931, see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ).
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Mar 1952.
---
Daily Variety
27 Feb 1952
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1951
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1951
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1951
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Sep 1951
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1951
pp. 1-2, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1951
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1952
p. 3.
Los Angeles Daily News
12 Sep 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Mar 1952
p. 1254.
New York Times
7 Jun 1952
p. 22.
New Yorker
14 Jun 1952.
---
Variety
27 Feb 1952
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Billy Newell
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hair styles des
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)," music by Roy Turk, lyrics by Fred E. Ahlert.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Young Man in a Hurry
The Family Man
Release Date:
2 May 1952
Production Date:
late August--mid October 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 February 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1527
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7,594
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15637
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Self-effacing Montana attorney Maxwell Webster comes home to his wife Julie and their three young children, happy that his law firm has just won a big case, because of his research and summation writing. Max has never argued a case himself, and Julie thinks he does not get enough credit. At the firm’s country club celebration that night, Julie drinks too much and drunkenly proposes a toast to the over-looked efforts of her husband. The embarrassed Max does not get angry, but in the middle of the night, Julie wakes up to find him brooding about being a failure in her eyes. She urges him to ask his boss, Edmund Jethrow, for a partnership, and the next day he does, but loses his job. Figuring that now is the perfect time to start out on his own, Max convinces Julie that they should move to Los Angeles, where the weather is warmer and opportunities greater. Because the house they planned to rent will not take children, the family moves into a California bungalow that the realtor says is in a “fast” neighborhood. Max and Julie are content with the place, except for the two telephones that ring constantly with people trying to place bets with the bookie who used to reside there. When Max enrolls in a course to help him pass the California bar examination, he uses the last of his money for one of the books. One of his fellow students, attractive Joyce Laramie, who has failed the exam twice, recognizes Max as an excellent lawyer and suggests they study together, as she has bought all of the ... +


Self-effacing Montana attorney Maxwell Webster comes home to his wife Julie and their three young children, happy that his law firm has just won a big case, because of his research and summation writing. Max has never argued a case himself, and Julie thinks he does not get enough credit. At the firm’s country club celebration that night, Julie drinks too much and drunkenly proposes a toast to the over-looked efforts of her husband. The embarrassed Max does not get angry, but in the middle of the night, Julie wakes up to find him brooding about being a failure in her eyes. She urges him to ask his boss, Edmund Jethrow, for a partnership, and the next day he does, but loses his job. Figuring that now is the perfect time to start out on his own, Max convinces Julie that they should move to Los Angeles, where the weather is warmer and opportunities greater. Because the house they planned to rent will not take children, the family moves into a California bungalow that the realtor says is in a “fast” neighborhood. Max and Julie are content with the place, except for the two telephones that ring constantly with people trying to place bets with the bookie who used to reside there. When Max enrolls in a course to help him pass the California bar examination, he uses the last of his money for one of the books. One of his fellow students, attractive Joyce Laramie, who has failed the exam twice, recognizes Max as an excellent lawyer and suggests they study together, as she has bought all of the books. Julie is not jealous of Max’s new friend, but laughs when he says that Joyce, who works for a collection agency, could get him a part time job with her company. Max is incensed that Julie does not think he could do collection work and decides to take Joyce up on her offer. On his first day on the job, Max is shocked by the subterfuge the company uses against its “deadbeat” clients and is unable to collect a single dollar. At home, Max is frantic when a man named Eddie Tasling, who telephoned that morning to place a bet, calls again, demanding his $800 winnings. That night, when Max goes to study with Joyce, he is too embarrassed to admit that he collected nothing that day and uses his last twelve dollars to make a payment toward unemployed singer Dorianne Gray’s mink stole. The next morning, when Julie notices that $12 are missing from Max’s wallet, he angrily says that he spent it, but refuses to say how. As they argue, Eddie calls again and threatens them, saying that he will find out where they live by going through the telephone directory. Later, while trying to think, Max takes a walk and comes across a bar called Eddie’s, then confirms that this is the same Eddie because the man keeps using the phone book to make calls. Some time later, Dorianne comes to the collection agency to pay off the balance of her stole because she has finally gotten a singing job. When she learns that the balance is $12 less than she thought, she deduces that Max made the payment and assumes that it is because he likes her. As the bar exam date approaches, Max spends more time studying at Eddie’s, trying to sabotage Eddie’s trek through the telephone book before he gets to the letter W. After taking the exam, as Max anxiously waits for the results, he is upset when Julie confesses that she had written to Mrs. Jethrow hoping to help him get his old job back. Max angrily says that Julie has no confidence in him, and Julie lashes out, saying that he has only tried mythical cases “in the bathroom.” She then says that she is going back to Montana, and Max leaves. As he walks out, he runs into Eddie, who asks if he is the man who takes the bets, and Max answers by slugging him. Now frightened, Eddie tells his companion that he suspects Max is part of a new gang, and the two quickly drive off. That night, when Max does not come home, a worried Julie goes to Joyce’s apartment looking for him. At first Julie is jealous, but soon realizes she is wrong and the two women become friends. Meanwhile, Max is in the nightclub where Dorianne sings. While Max drunkenly tells the piano player what a good mother Julie is, mobster Brick Davis comes into the club with Eddie and sits at Max’s table. Brick threatens Max if he does not pay the $800. A few moments later, Dorianne, who knows Brick, comes to the table. When Brick is first rude, then pushes Dorianne, Max takes a swing at him and a brawl ensues. At night court, Brick’s lawyer tells Max to accept a plea bargain to plead guilty on a misdemeanor, but Max refuses because it would prevent him from becoming a member of the California bar. When their trial comes up in a few days, Max, who has refused to see Julie while he is in jail, tells Joyce that he is disappointed that they have so little faith in him that they have hired a “good” lawyer, and determines to defend himself. At the trial, Dorianne and other witnesses fearfully refuse to confirm that Brick started the fight. Despite this, Max’s honest summation so impresses the jury that they find Max innocent but the others guilty. After the verdict, Dorianne apologizes to Max, and Joyce informs him that they both have passed the bar. Ashamed of herself, Julie runs sobbing from the courtroom. At home, Max and Julie make up and Max tells her that Clayton, a well-known lawyer who had observed the trial was so impressed that he offered Max a junior partnership. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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