The 49th Man (1953)

73 mins | Drama | June 1953

Director:

Fred F. Sears

Writer:

Harry Essex

Producer:

Sam Katzman

Cinematographer:

Lester White

Editor:

William Lyon

Production Designer:

Paul Palmentola

Production Company:

Esskay Pictures Co.
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HISTORY

The working title for the film was 49 Men . HR news items indicate that the Cass County Boys were to record music for the film and that one member of the trio, Bert Dodson, was to appear in the film, but his appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed. The film, which was presented in a documentary fashion, utilized stock footage of atomic bomb ... More Less

The working title for the film was 49 Men . HR news items indicate that the Cass County Boys were to record music for the film and that one member of the trio, Bert Dodson, was to appear in the film, but his appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed. The film, which was presented in a documentary fashion, utilized stock footage of atomic bomb explosions. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
30 May 1953.
---
Daily Variety
8 May 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 May 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 52
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 May 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 May 53
p. 1838.
Variety
13 May 53
p. 18.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
49 Men
Release Date:
June 1953
Production Date:
11 December--22 December 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 April 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2482
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16329
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Outside the small city of Lordsburgh, New Mexico, the police discover an unusual briefcase in the remains of a car wreck and take the case and contents to federal agent John Williams. After examining the unfamiliar mechanism inside the case, John takes it to the government atomic laboratory at Los Alamos, on a hunch. Scientists confirm John's suspicion that the apparatus is part of an atomic bomb detonation device. Chief of the Security Investigation Division Paul Regan assigns John to head the investigation. John's inquiry leads to Louisiana, where a helicopter pilot with a case identical to the one in New Mexico is picked up by the Army. Shortly afterward, just offshore of Coney Island, New York, another case is discovered tied to a marker buoy. John has this case analyzed and learns it is European-made with galvanized iron and was submerged for approximately forty-eight hours, suggesting it might have been dropped off by a passing ship. All entrances into the country are alerted, and in the next few days, six more cases are picked up, revealing that at least four detonating devices are being constructed. The messengers carrying the cases provide little information. Paul keeps the investigation out of the press, although several journalists begin to grow suspicious. When a submarine arriving from France into the Washington, D.C. harbor is discovered to have uranium soldered to the bottom of the hull, Paul has John go undercover on the sub's return trip as a naval ensign making a training film. In Marseilles, France, John's government contact is civilian Andre. At a popular waterfront bar, Henri's Café, John spots another matching case, ... +


Outside the small city of Lordsburgh, New Mexico, the police discover an unusual briefcase in the remains of a car wreck and take the case and contents to federal agent John Williams. After examining the unfamiliar mechanism inside the case, John takes it to the government atomic laboratory at Los Alamos, on a hunch. Scientists confirm John's suspicion that the apparatus is part of an atomic bomb detonation device. Chief of the Security Investigation Division Paul Regan assigns John to head the investigation. John's inquiry leads to Louisiana, where a helicopter pilot with a case identical to the one in New Mexico is picked up by the Army. Shortly afterward, just offshore of Coney Island, New York, another case is discovered tied to a marker buoy. John has this case analyzed and learns it is European-made with galvanized iron and was submerged for approximately forty-eight hours, suggesting it might have been dropped off by a passing ship. All entrances into the country are alerted, and in the next few days, six more cases are picked up, revealing that at least four detonating devices are being constructed. The messengers carrying the cases provide little information. Paul keeps the investigation out of the press, although several journalists begin to grow suspicious. When a submarine arriving from France into the Washington, D.C. harbor is discovered to have uranium soldered to the bottom of the hull, Paul has John go undercover on the sub's return trip as a naval ensign making a training film. In Marseilles, France, John's government contact is civilian Andre. At a popular waterfront bar, Henri's Café, John spots another matching case, used by musician Buzz Olin to store his clarinet. John befriends Olin and his friends, Leo and Margo Wayne and Dave Norton, who John discovers are ex-patriot Americans. The following day, John learns from Norton that Olin has disappeared and begins a search of all the local luggage makers. The maker of the cases is soon located and reveals that the original order, placed by telephone, was for forty-eight cases, which were picked up by a truck. When shown photos of Olin and his friends, the luggage maker cannot identify any of them, but admits that Olin placed an order for four cases, only one of which was fitted for his clarinet. John believes the Waynes are involved in the scheme when it is discovered that they have each been observed near the submarine. John arranges for the submarine to return to America unexpectedly and informs the Waynes at Henri's. The night before the submarine's departure, John and Andre witness Margo approach the submarine with an envelope, but both are struck before they can see to whom she makes her delivery. John manages to rip the coat of their attacker, which identifies the culprit as a naval officer, named Lt. Magrew, aide to submarine commander Jackson. When Magrew and Jackson are followed to Henri's, John brings the luggage maker to the café to identify Magrew as the man who picked up the cases, but the man identifies Jackson instead. Stunned, John nevertheless requests permission from America to arrest Jackson and Magrew, but on board the submarine, he is overpowered by Andre and drugged by the pharmacy mate. In Washington, John escapes from his captors and flees to Paul's office, only to find Jackson and Magrew there. Paul discloses that the entire atomic bomb intrigue has been part of a war games maneuver of which he himself was not aware. Paul explains that John made the connection between Jackson, an atomic expert, and the luggage maker too soon, forcing an end to his role. The number of cases was chosen to represent each state and all the suspects were part of the exercise. When Paul tells John that the forty-eighth man was just apprehended as intended, John asks if it was Olin or Wayne, names Paul does not recognize. John excitedly describes how Olin had four cases made and asks if Margo was involved in the war game. When she proves not to have been part of the official action, a search for her and her husband is made in Marseilles, but the couple is reported missing. John summons the submarine crew, but the pharmacy mate does not return to the ship, thereby revealing himself as Margo's contact. The next day the body of the sailor is discovered in the Potomac River. Almost simultaneously Paul receives a report that Margo's body has been found in a Marseilles apartment. Using Olin's connection with a musician's union, John tracks him to an abandoned rest home in the desert, where, after a struggle, he confesses that Wayne has a complete bomb and intends to explode it in San Francisco. The police and government agents pursue Wayne to a small airstrip outside the city and overpower him. Paul has John, a former pilot, fly the plane toward the desert while he and Jackson struggle to defuse the bomb. Unable to do so in time, they drop the device over a known atomic testing site in New Mexico, where it explodes safely. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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