Latin Lovers (1953)

104 mins | Romantic comedy | 28 August 1953

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writer:

Isobel Lennart

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Gabriel Scognamillo

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to contemporary sources, Fernando Lamas and Michael Wilding were originally cast as the rivals for Lana Turner's character. However, Lamas was removed from the picture when his real-life romance with Turner ended acrimoniously. Wilding was suspended by M-G-M for declining the role of "Paul Chevron." In his autobiography, Wilding wrote, "I was classified as a rebel when I refused [the role]...since I was determined not to start my Hollywood career by making a rubbishy film." According to M-G-M music notes, singer Ruben Reyes recorded the song "Come to My Arms" as a voice double for Ricardo Montalban, but this version was not used. The music notes also indicate that singer Anne Salva recorded "The Night and You," but the song was only performed as an instrumental in the completed film. A 5 Dec 1952 HR news item adds Reyes and Salva to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR news items also include Shirley Jean Erickson and Wes Sheldon in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       According to a HR news item, the polo scenes were shot on location at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. Reviews praised costume designer Helen Rose's numerous gowns for Turner, all of which were in shades of black, white and gray. LAEx noted that these outfits were "extremely effective in Technicolor." Latin Lovers was Montalban's last film for M-G-M. His seven-year contract expired in Sep 1953, a time when the studio was reducing its roster of contract players ... More Less

According to contemporary sources, Fernando Lamas and Michael Wilding were originally cast as the rivals for Lana Turner's character. However, Lamas was removed from the picture when his real-life romance with Turner ended acrimoniously. Wilding was suspended by M-G-M for declining the role of "Paul Chevron." In his autobiography, Wilding wrote, "I was classified as a rebel when I refused [the role]...since I was determined not to start my Hollywood career by making a rubbishy film." According to M-G-M music notes, singer Ruben Reyes recorded the song "Come to My Arms" as a voice double for Ricardo Montalban, but this version was not used. The music notes also indicate that singer Anne Salva recorded "The Night and You," but the song was only performed as an instrumental in the completed film. A 5 Dec 1952 HR news item adds Reyes and Salva to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR news items also include Shirley Jean Erickson and Wes Sheldon in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       According to a HR news item, the polo scenes were shot on location at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. Reviews praised costume designer Helen Rose's numerous gowns for Turner, all of which were in shades of black, white and gray. LAEx noted that these outfits were "extremely effective in Technicolor." Latin Lovers was Montalban's last film for M-G-M. His seven-year contract expired in Sep 1953, a time when the studio was reducing its roster of contract players and scaling back production. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Jul 1953.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jul 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Jul 53
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 52
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 52
p. 6, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 53
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 53
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 53
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 53
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 53
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
29 Aug 1953.
---
Motion Picture Daily
21 Jul 1953.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jul 53
p. 1926.
New York Times
13 Aug 53
p. 17.
Newsweek
24 Aug 1953.
---
Variety
22 Jul 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost des by
Men's cost des by
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Hair styles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Tech adv
Riding instructor
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Ricardo Montalban
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Col consultant
SOURCES
MUSIC
"The Night and You" by Nicholas Brodszky
"Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," music traditional.
SONGS
"I Had to Kiss You," "Come to My Arms," "Carlotta, Ya Gotta Be Mine" and "A Little More of Your Amour," music by Nicholas Brodszky, lyrics by Leo Robin.
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 August 1953
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 12 August 1953
Production Date:
2 December 1952--mid January 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 July 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2829
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
104
Length(in feet):
9,385
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16391
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After conducting a high-powered meeting with the board of directors of her New York corporation, wealthy, beautiful Nora Taylor rushes to her session with analyst Lionel Y. Newman, to discuss her conflicted feelings about her boyfriend, Paul Chevron. Nora, who became rich when her mailman father struck oil, questions whether the men she dates truly love her, or merely desire her $37 million fortune. Newman points out that Paul has $48 million of his own, and predicts that the assertive businessman will take charge of the situation and insist that Nora marry him. Meanwhile, Paul consults a female analyst for advice on proposing to Nora, and is urged not to be too forceful. That evening, over dinner at a nightclub, Paul brings up the subject of marriage but, acting on his analyst's advice, tells Nora not to give her answer until he returns from a polo trip to Brazil in three weeks. Before she can reply, Nora is asked to dance by a Brazilian man, who tells her that the atmosphere in Brazil makes all men passionate about women. Curious to see what effect the country will have on Paul, Nora secretly flies to Brazil, accompanied by her secretary, Anne Kellwood. They check into the same hotel as Paul, and when Nora goes to her beau's room to surprise him, she finds him laid up with polo injuries. The following day, while Paul is looking at some horses, Nora is taken with their owner, the handsome Roberto Santos. After the horses are shown, Nora strolls back to the stables, and Roberto seizes her without a word and kisses her passionately. That evening, ... +


After conducting a high-powered meeting with the board of directors of her New York corporation, wealthy, beautiful Nora Taylor rushes to her session with analyst Lionel Y. Newman, to discuss her conflicted feelings about her boyfriend, Paul Chevron. Nora, who became rich when her mailman father struck oil, questions whether the men she dates truly love her, or merely desire her $37 million fortune. Newman points out that Paul has $48 million of his own, and predicts that the assertive businessman will take charge of the situation and insist that Nora marry him. Meanwhile, Paul consults a female analyst for advice on proposing to Nora, and is urged not to be too forceful. That evening, over dinner at a nightclub, Paul brings up the subject of marriage but, acting on his analyst's advice, tells Nora not to give her answer until he returns from a polo trip to Brazil in three weeks. Before she can reply, Nora is asked to dance by a Brazilian man, who tells her that the atmosphere in Brazil makes all men passionate about women. Curious to see what effect the country will have on Paul, Nora secretly flies to Brazil, accompanied by her secretary, Anne Kellwood. They check into the same hotel as Paul, and when Nora goes to her beau's room to surprise him, she finds him laid up with polo injuries. The following day, while Paul is looking at some horses, Nora is taken with their owner, the handsome Roberto Santos. After the horses are shown, Nora strolls back to the stables, and Roberto seizes her without a word and kisses her passionately. That evening, Nora engages Howard G. Hubbell, from the American Embassy, to teach her Portuguese. She then calls Newman, who tells Nora to do exactly what she feels like doing. Nora promptly cancels her dinner date with Paul and, armed only with the Portuguese phrase "You have beautiful horses, darling," returns to Roberto's villa. There she finds a party in progress, and is surprised to discover that Roberto speaks English. Roberto teaches Nora to dance the samba, and when she gets a thorn in her foot, carries her back to the home he shares with his grandfather, Eduardo. Nora returns to her hotel room in a happy daze that night and tells Anne to take a few days off. Meanwhile, Roberto tells his grandfather that he wants to marry Nora. The following morning, Nora informs Paul that she intends to marry Roberto. Paul takes the news calmly, and Nora invites Roberto and Eduardo to dine with them that evening. After their guests leave, Paul observes that a proud man like Roberto probably will not take the news of Nora's fortune well. After again calling Newman for advice, Nora tells Roberto about her money, and he is delighted by the news. Roberto's enthusiasm about her money begins to trouble her, however, and he offers no reassurance, telling Nora she will simply have to trust in his love for her. Nora devises a plan to test Roberto's sincerity, and on the night of their engagement party, she happily tells him that she is giving away all of her money. Roberto is displeased, and Nora ends their engagement and leaves the party with Paul. Back at the hotel, Paul calls his analyst, who instructs him to be masterful and sweep Nora off her feet, then goes back to her patient, who happens to be Newman's frustrated wife. Paul marches into Nora's room and tells her they will marry that night, but Nora sadly admits to Paul that she does not love him. After Paul leaves, Anne reveals that she is in love with Paul, and Nora gives her secretary her blessing. When Anne remarks that Paul's money does not intimidate her, adding that only the person who has money has to worry about it, Nora suddenly sees her own situation in a new light. She goes to Roberto's villa and states her intention to marry him on her own terms--namely, that she be allowed to give all her money to him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.