Money from Home (1954)

98-100 mins | Comedy | February 1954

Director:

George Marshall

Producer:

Hal B. Wallis

Cinematographer:

Daniel L. Fapp

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Henry Bumstead

Production Company:

Wallis-Hazen, Inc.
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HISTORY

Voice-over narration is heard at the beginning of the film, describing the New York setting and introducing some of the story’s “colorful” characters. A Jun 1952 LAEx item announced that Robert Baker would be writing the film’s screenplay with James Allardice, but only Allardice received onscreen credit. Baker’s contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. According to an Aug 1953 HR news item, producers Hal B. Wallis and Joseph H. Hazen made the film independently, before a distributor was in place. In late Jun 1953, Wallis and Hazen dissolved their company, Hal Wallis Productions, through which they had made many films for Paramount release. HR news items add B. S. Pulley , William Fawcett, Juanita Bredt, Zona Fe, Ruth Gills, Kanza Omar, Suzanne Ridgeway , Jackie Shields and Anne Toth to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been ... More Less

Voice-over narration is heard at the beginning of the film, describing the New York setting and introducing some of the story’s “colorful” characters. A Jun 1952 LAEx item announced that Robert Baker would be writing the film’s screenplay with James Allardice, but only Allardice received onscreen credit. Baker’s contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. According to an Aug 1953 HR news item, producers Hal B. Wallis and Joseph H. Hazen made the film independently, before a distributor was in place. In late Jun 1953, Wallis and Hazen dissolved their company, Hal Wallis Productions, through which they had made many films for Paramount release. HR news items add B. S. Pulley , William Fawcett, Juanita Bredt, Zona Fe, Ruth Gills, Kanza Omar, Suzanne Ridgeway , Jackie Shields and Anne Toth to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Dec 1953.
---
Daily Variety
1 Dec 1953
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Dec 1953
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1953
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 1953
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1953
p. 2, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1953
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 1953
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1953
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 1953.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1953
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
3 Jun 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Dec 1953
p. 2093.
New York Times
27 Feb 1954
p. 11.
Time
15 Mar 1954.
---
Variety
2 Dec 1953
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Hal Wallis' Production of
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Spec material in song numbers staged by
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Adpt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Ed supv
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Songs arr and cond
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Money from Home by Damon Runyon (New York, 1935).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"I Only Have Eyes for You," words by Al Dubin, music by Harry Warren
"Moments Like This," words and music by Burton Lane and Frank Loesser
"Be Careful Song" and "Love Is the Same All Over the World," words and music by Jack Brooks and Joseph J. Lilley.
DETAILS
Release Date:
February 1954
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 February 1954
New York opening: 26 February 1954
Production Date:
9 March--late April 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Hal B. Wallis, Joseph H. Hazen
Copyright Date:
1 February 1954
Copyright Number:
LP3957
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
3-D
Duration(in mins):
98-100
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16554
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One day, in 1920s New York, unlucky racetrack gambler Honey Talk Nelson is hauled in to see gangster Jumbo Schneider, to whom he owes $3,450. Jumbo suggests that Honey clear his debt, and save his life, by going to Tarrytown, Maryland, and preventing My Sheba, the favorite in an upcoming $50,000 steeplechase race, against whom Jumbo is betting, from racing. To that end, Jumbo orders Honey to romance Phyllis Leigh, My Sheba’s owner, and use “horse doctor” Virgil Yokum, Honey’s cousin, to convince Phyllis to take My Sheba out of the race. The unsuspecting Virgil, who is an accident-prone veterinary intern, happily accepts his cousin’s invitation to vacation in Maryland until Honey admits at the train station that he has no money for the tickets. Virgil is about to go home when Honey spots Seldom Seen Kid, Jumbo’s thug, and panics. Honey exchanges Virgil’s suitcases for a suitcase he finds among a rich Poojah’s belongings and allows one of the Poojah’s men to chase him into the bathroom. There, he steals the man’s clothes, then forces Virgil to don a veiled outfit from the suitcase, which belongs to one of the Poojah’s many wives. Later, on the train, Virgil, still dressed as a woman, dances for the amorous Poojah, who chases him around the compartment. Desperate, Virgil jumps out a window while hanging onto a curtain and is spotted by Honey, who is busy charming the Poojah’s wives. Honey pulls Virgil inside just as the Poojah’s man arrives with a policeman to arrest them. Honey and Virgil dive out the window and land in a field, then are picked ... +


One day, in 1920s New York, unlucky racetrack gambler Honey Talk Nelson is hauled in to see gangster Jumbo Schneider, to whom he owes $3,450. Jumbo suggests that Honey clear his debt, and save his life, by going to Tarrytown, Maryland, and preventing My Sheba, the favorite in an upcoming $50,000 steeplechase race, against whom Jumbo is betting, from racing. To that end, Jumbo orders Honey to romance Phyllis Leigh, My Sheba’s owner, and use “horse doctor” Virgil Yokum, Honey’s cousin, to convince Phyllis to take My Sheba out of the race. The unsuspecting Virgil, who is an accident-prone veterinary intern, happily accepts his cousin’s invitation to vacation in Maryland until Honey admits at the train station that he has no money for the tickets. Virgil is about to go home when Honey spots Seldom Seen Kid, Jumbo’s thug, and panics. Honey exchanges Virgil’s suitcases for a suitcase he finds among a rich Poojah’s belongings and allows one of the Poojah’s men to chase him into the bathroom. There, he steals the man’s clothes, then forces Virgil to don a veiled outfit from the suitcase, which belongs to one of the Poojah’s many wives. Later, on the train, Virgil, still dressed as a woman, dances for the amorous Poojah, who chases him around the compartment. Desperate, Virgil jumps out a window while hanging onto a curtain and is spotted by Honey, who is busy charming the Poojah’s wives. Honey pulls Virgil inside just as the Poojah’s man arrives with a policeman to arrest them. Honey and Virgil dive out the window and land in a field, then are picked up by motorist Bertie Searles, My Sheba’s English jockey. The alcoholic Bertie allows Honey to drive his car to Tarrytown and passes out with drink before they arrive. As Virgil is carrying Bertie into his hotel, Phyllis notices them and introduces herself to Honey. After telling Phyllis that he is Bertie’s agent, Honey convinces Virgil to impersonate Bertie, whom Phyllis has never met. That night at a ball honoring the Poojah, Virgil does his best to sound English, while Honey romances Phyllis, who is also being wooed by Marshall Preston, the suave jockey riding Jumbo’s pick in the race. Tiring of his impersonation, the animal-loving Virgil goes upstairs to reclaim his suitcases, in which he had packed his ant farm. As soon as he reunites with his ants, Bertie arrives at the ball, drunk, and in the ensuing confusion, Virgil breaks the ant farm. Honey manages to quiet Bertie before he can expose Virgil, but afterward, the party guests are besieged by Virgil’s ants. The next morning, Virgil sees a lost dog in the street and rushes to save it. Virgil takes the injured dog to the local veterinarian and is astounded to discover the doctor is a young woman named Autumn Claypool. Immediately smitten, Virgil asks Autumn, a fellow vegetarian, to dinner, then tells Honey and Phyllis that he sprained his wrist and cannot train on My Sheba that day. Later, in their hotel room, Virgil admits he is faking, and upset, Honey tells him the truth about Jumbo. Infuriated by Honey’s confession,Virgil threatens to tell Phyllis everything, just as Seldom Seen, who has followed the boys, arrives and overhears their argument. Determined to keep Honey on track, Seldom Seen knocks Virgil out and gives Honey a warning. That night, Autumn shows Virgil the site where she hopes to build a new clinic and reveals that she made a large bet on My Sheba. After Autumn hints that she would like Virgil to become her partner, Virgil kisses her and determines to do what he can to help My Sheba win. Honey, meanwhile, is wooing Phyllis when she confides that she is in debt and desperately needs to win the race. Realizing that he is in love, Honey tells Virgil that he, too, wants My Sheba to win, and to prepare for the next day’s race, the two drag the sleeping Bertie to Phyllis’ barn. My Sheba, however, rejects Bertie, rearing every time he comes near. Phyllis and the visiting Preston hear the commotion in the barn and confront Honey and Virgil. After Honey admits all, Phyllis storms off, and Seldom Seen, with whom Preston is conspiring, again threatens the boys. Seldom Seen then reports to Jumbo, who decides to fly down immediately with his thugs. Meanwhile, Bertie, hoping to bond with My Sheba, gets the horse drunk, and the next morning, Honey and Virgil find them both badly hung-over. While Virgil and Autumn concoct hangover medication for My Sheba, Honey tries to restore Bertie at the hotel. After Honey steps out to retrieve some coffee for the jockey, Jumbo and his men burst in and kidnap Bertie. Seldom Seen then nabs Virgil, who is locked in the same hotel room as Bertie. Having witnessed Virgil’s abduction, Honey sneaks in and frees them, and all three dash to the racetrack. There, they are attacked and chased by Jumbo and his thugs, who are determined to keep My Sheba from racing. In the commotion, however, Virgil ends up on My Sheba, who bolts onto the track just as the race begins. During the race, Preston knocks Virgil off My Sheba and reveals he is conspiring with Jumbo. Egged on by Autumn, Virgil remounts and catches up to Preston. When Preston again tries to knock Virgil off, both men tumble to the ground, and Preston unwittingly remounts My Sheba. Virgil then jumps on the horse’s back, and My Sheba wins the race with two jockeys. Later, after the judges determine that My Sheba’s victory was legitimate, Preston and Jumbo are arrested and a forgiving Phyllis embraces Honey. Phyllis and Honey, and Virgil and Autumn contemplate marriage, and Virgil announces that My Sheba is expecting a foal in the spring. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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