Savage Frontier (1953)

53-54 mins | Western | 15 May 1953

Director:

Harry Keller

Cinematographer:

Bud Thackery

Editor:

Harold Minter

Production Designer:

Frank Arrigo

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of the film was El Paso Stampede . According to a Feb 1953 HR news item, portions of the film were shot at Burro Flats, CA. A modern source adds Art Dillard to the ... More Less

The working title of the film was El Paso Stampede . According to a Feb 1953 HR news item, portions of the film were shot at Burro Flats, CA. A modern source adds Art Dillard to the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Jun 1953.
---
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1953.
---
Daily Variety
21 May 53
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 53
p. 5, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 53
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 May 53
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jun 53
p. 1863.
Variety
27 May 53
p. 6.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
El Paso Stampede
Release Date:
15 May 1953
Production Date:
began 10 February 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 May 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2840
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor
Duration(in mins):
53-54
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16075
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After outlaws ambush and kill a young federal marshal, who was part of a posse chasing them, one of the outlaws, Cherokee Kid, who is suffering from a toothache, convinces his cohorts that it is safe to go to the town of Bitter Spring to see a dentist. Allan "Rocky" Lane, a federal marshal and colleague of the murdered man, follows them there, but is recognized by Cherokee's waiting cohorts, Buck Madsen and Tulsa Tom. A gunfight ensues, but the two outlaws get away, leaving behind Cherokee, who has been gassed unconscious by the town's barber-dentist, Nugget Clark, with his modern gas mask. Nugget, who is also the city marshal, locks Cherokee in the jail, but the outlaw soon shoots his way out, killing the deputy, Dan Longley, after a gun is secretly smuggled into his cell by William Oakes, the town's cafe owner and community leader. In town, Oakes, who is secretly working with the gang, then gets Nugget fired for incompetence and directs suspicion toward Oakes's former secret partner, Sam Webb, a reformed parolee who now runs a farm with his sister Elizabeth and younger brother Johnny. Although Sam would like to turn Oakes in, Oakes threatens to tell the law that Johnny once assisted with a bank holdup when Sam was away. However, Oakes's hastiness in removing Nugget from the marshal's office makes Rocky suspicious of him. After noticing that Cherokee's food tray, which is delivered from Oakes's cafe to the jail, is sticky underneath, Rocky guesses that a gun was taped to the bottom with a new kind of mending tape and asks for Nugget's unofficial help in solving the case. Meanwhile, Sam decides that ... +


After outlaws ambush and kill a young federal marshal, who was part of a posse chasing them, one of the outlaws, Cherokee Kid, who is suffering from a toothache, convinces his cohorts that it is safe to go to the town of Bitter Spring to see a dentist. Allan "Rocky" Lane, a federal marshal and colleague of the murdered man, follows them there, but is recognized by Cherokee's waiting cohorts, Buck Madsen and Tulsa Tom. A gunfight ensues, but the two outlaws get away, leaving behind Cherokee, who has been gassed unconscious by the town's barber-dentist, Nugget Clark, with his modern gas mask. Nugget, who is also the city marshal, locks Cherokee in the jail, but the outlaw soon shoots his way out, killing the deputy, Dan Longley, after a gun is secretly smuggled into his cell by William Oakes, the town's cafe owner and community leader. In town, Oakes, who is secretly working with the gang, then gets Nugget fired for incompetence and directs suspicion toward Oakes's former secret partner, Sam Webb, a reformed parolee who now runs a farm with his sister Elizabeth and younger brother Johnny. Although Sam would like to turn Oakes in, Oakes threatens to tell the law that Johnny once assisted with a bank holdup when Sam was away. However, Oakes's hastiness in removing Nugget from the marshal's office makes Rocky suspicious of him. After noticing that Cherokee's food tray, which is delivered from Oakes's cafe to the jail, is sticky underneath, Rocky guesses that a gun was taped to the bottom with a new kind of mending tape and asks for Nugget's unofficial help in solving the case. Meanwhile, Sam decides that Cherokee has to be stopped from murdering innocent people, even at the risk of Johnny spending a few years in jail for his one crime. Breaking the rules of his parole, Sam puts on a gun and confronts Oakes, but Rocky sees him armed and takes him to the jail for questioning. Sam hesitates to reveal Oakes's criminal activities and Cherokee is able to shoot him through the window before he gives Rocky any useful information. Rocky shoots back, but Cherokee rides away. However, Johnny shows up and assumes that Rocky shot Sam. Because Johnny's hotheadedness is dangerous for everyone, Rocky and Nugget lock him up to cool off. Meanwhile, the doctor decides to keep Sam at the jailhouse under Elizabeth's care, as the bullet is lodged dangerously close to his heart. Having seen Oakes watching idly from across the street when Cherokee shot Sam, Rocky becomes even more suspicious of the businessman, and when he rides out of town, Rocky follows, unaware that Oakes is setting a trap for him. However, Nugget notices Buck Madsen following Rocky and rides out to warn him, leaving Elizabeth with her brothers at the jailhouse. After Nugget leaves, Johnny convinces Elizabeth to free him, but then grabs a gun and goes after Rocky for supposedly shooting Sam. Outside of town, Rocky rides into the ambush near the outlaws' hideout cave, but with Nugget's help, apprehends Cherokee, Tulsa and other members of the gang, except for Oakes, who has returned to town during the skirmish to finish off Sam. At the cave, Johnny slips up from behind and is about to shoot Rocky, when he realizes that Cherokee was the man who wounded Sam. When Cherokee tries to draw a hidden gun, Johnny fires at him first. Aware that Oakes is missing from the group, Rocky rides swiftly back to town. He gets to the jailhouse in time to save Sam, but then must fight Oakes. After a struggle, Rocky knocks him out, and Johnny and Elizabeth apologize for distrusting him. Later, after the remaining outlaws are locked up, Rocky tells Nugget that he will not pursue Johnny for his part in the bank holdup, as Johnny was young at the time and did help to stop Cherokee. After leaving Nugget to tell a young admirer exaggerated stories of his previous triumphs, Rocky rides off to his next assignment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.