Son of the Renegade (1953)

56-57 or 59 mins | Western | 27 March 1953

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HISTORY

Some scenes in the flashback and latter day sequences are unclear. In one scene, a member of “Wild Bill Hickock’s” gang is addressed as “Koontz,” but there is no character with this name listed in reviews or in onscreen cast credits. Although the last name of the actor portraying “Wild Bill Hickok" is Coontz, the character bearing the name “Koontz” is not the same actor. Further inconsistencies in the plot fail to establish how the characters Lori and Johnny are the same age despite the fact that her grandfather was a contemporary of Johnny’s father. In addition, in the scene in which Lori tells her father about her friendship with Johnny, she reveals that Johnny had rejected an offer from the governor for a special commission as state marshal so that he could return home. In a later scene, Johnny has inexplicably obtained the deed to his father’s former property, however, how the obstacles to securing the deed were overcome are not depicted in the film.
       Although Reg Browne, an editor, is credited onscreen as the director of Son of the Renegade , a modern source credits actor Roy Canada. No other sources have been located to confirm this information. Assistant director Leon Chooluck's name is misspelled "Chulock" in the opening ... More Less

Some scenes in the flashback and latter day sequences are unclear. In one scene, a member of “Wild Bill Hickock’s” gang is addressed as “Koontz,” but there is no character with this name listed in reviews or in onscreen cast credits. Although the last name of the actor portraying “Wild Bill Hickok" is Coontz, the character bearing the name “Koontz” is not the same actor. Further inconsistencies in the plot fail to establish how the characters Lori and Johnny are the same age despite the fact that her grandfather was a contemporary of Johnny’s father. In addition, in the scene in which Lori tells her father about her friendship with Johnny, she reveals that Johnny had rejected an offer from the governor for a special commission as state marshal so that he could return home. In a later scene, Johnny has inexplicably obtained the deed to his father’s former property, however, how the obstacles to securing the deed were overcome are not depicted in the film.
       Although Reg Browne, an editor, is credited onscreen as the director of Son of the Renegade , a modern source credits actor Roy Canada. No other sources have been located to confirm this information. Assistant director Leon Chooluck's name is misspelled "Chulock" in the opening credits. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Mar 1953.
---
Daily Variety
13 Mar 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Mar 53
p. 1766.
The Exhibitor
25 Mar 1953
p. 3487.
Variety
25 Mar 53
p. 6.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Son of the Outlaw
Release Date:
27 March 1953
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: week of 12 March 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Jack Schwarz Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 February 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2533
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
56-57 or 59
Length(in feet):
5,095
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16014
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Red River Johnny and his friends, Cherokee, The Gun Slinger, Baby Face Bill, Dusty and Valley, all sons and daughters of men who rode with Johnny’s outlaw father, ride to the crest of the valley where he grew up. Johnny has returned to reclaim the ranch formerly owned by the outlaw whose name he bears. Years earlier, Johnny’s father confronted his nemesis, Three Fingers Jack, in a duel: Red River Johnny kills Jack and thereby becomes a hunted murderer. His name becomes synonymous with bloodshed, and he is joined by other notorious outlaws as they ride roughshod over the area. Bat Masters rides with Red River Johnny, but when he is exposed as a sheriff, he is cast out of the gang. Masters deputizes those who leave with him, and they devote their energies to hunting and killing Red River Johnny. After a long period of robberies and gunfights, Red River Johnny’s wife Cathy pleads with him to leave the area so they can raise their son in peace. Together they fend off yet another attack, then leave the valley for good. Now, Red River Johnny has died and the son who bears his name wants to move back home and live in peace. However, Bat Masters’ namesake, a sheriff himself, and other descendants of Red River Johnny’s enemies, continue their fathers’ legacy of hate. To help Johnny, Baby Face and The Gun Slinger ride to town and ask a deputy sheriff about the land that belonged to Johnny’s father. They return to camp with the information that Johnny is being blamed for a recent spate of robberies ... +


Red River Johnny and his friends, Cherokee, The Gun Slinger, Baby Face Bill, Dusty and Valley, all sons and daughters of men who rode with Johnny’s outlaw father, ride to the crest of the valley where he grew up. Johnny has returned to reclaim the ranch formerly owned by the outlaw whose name he bears. Years earlier, Johnny’s father confronted his nemesis, Three Fingers Jack, in a duel: Red River Johnny kills Jack and thereby becomes a hunted murderer. His name becomes synonymous with bloodshed, and he is joined by other notorious outlaws as they ride roughshod over the area. Bat Masters rides with Red River Johnny, but when he is exposed as a sheriff, he is cast out of the gang. Masters deputizes those who leave with him, and they devote their energies to hunting and killing Red River Johnny. After a long period of robberies and gunfights, Red River Johnny’s wife Cathy pleads with him to leave the area so they can raise their son in peace. Together they fend off yet another attack, then leave the valley for good. Now, Red River Johnny has died and the son who bears his name wants to move back home and live in peace. However, Bat Masters’ namesake, a sheriff himself, and other descendants of Red River Johnny’s enemies, continue their fathers’ legacy of hate. To help Johnny, Baby Face and The Gun Slinger ride to town and ask a deputy sheriff about the land that belonged to Johnny’s father. They return to camp with the information that Johnny is being blamed for a recent spate of robberies in the area. Although Valley flirts with Johnny, she is secretly trying to seduce him so that she can get his ranch for her true love, outlaw Billy. Johnny encounters Billy shortly after another stagecoach robbery and realizes the outlaw’s horse has the same markings as his own. Johnny then threatens Billy if he continues to frame him for the robberies. Not long after, Billy’s gang escapes after a brush with Bat and his deputies. Johnny, however, confronts Bat, who warns him that his father’s ranch is being sold for back taxes. Johnny claims he is innocent and vows that he will get back his father’s ranch. Some time later, Johnny meets with Bat’s daughter Lori, a former school friend who is still loyal to him. Their conversation is interrupted when The Long Haired Kid, a member of Billy’s gang, challenges Johnny to a duel. Johnny easily disarms the Kid with two shots and is allowed to go free because Lori and Baby Face, who witnessed the event, defend him to Bat. Lori then assures her father that her friendship with Johnny is platonic, and that Johnny is trustworthy. Bat concedes that he may be wrong about Johnny. After the next mine payroll is robbed, Valley tells Billy that Johnny has seen through her ruse. Moments later the real leader of the outlaws, Three Fingers Jack, son of the outlaw killed by Johnny’s father, returns from an absence and swiftly relieves Billy of his command with a blow from his fist. Jack then plots to rob the express office in Ox Bow, and orders his man Koontz to kill Valley. Meanwhile, Johnny and Dusty finally admit they love each other. After Dusty rides away, Lori arrives to warn Johnny that Bat plans to arrest him for the mine payroll robbery. Although Johnny now owns the deed to his father’s ranch, he admits that he robbed the mine payroll to prevent Billy from getting the money. The mortally wounded Valley then rides up to warn Johnny about Billy and Jack’s plan. Afterward, Lori and Johnny are startled when Koontz shoots at them. Lori rides to town for help while Johnny confronts the gunman. However, when Koontz runs out of bullets, he knocks out Johnny with a log and heads for Ox Bow. Following Lori’s directions, Johnny’s friends also ride to Ox Bow, arriving shortly after Jack and his gang have cleared the streets with their bullets. Johnny’s friends join forces with Bat against the outlaws in a fierce gun battle. Having recovered from the blow to his head, Johnny joins in the fray, but is shot and wounded. Jack’s gang is soon reduced to just him and Billy. After Billy kills his leader in cold blood, he is shot and killed by Baby Face. After Johnny’s wounds are tended to, he and Bat make peace. With their troubles resolved, Johnny and his friends plan to re-establish his father’s ranch. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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