Tarzan and the She-Devil (1953)

74-76 mins | Adventure | 8 June 1953

Director:

Kurt Neumann

Producer:

Sol Lesser

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Leon Barsha

Production Designer:

Carroll Clark
Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Tarzan and the Vampire and Tarzan and the Ivory Thieves . The film's title card reads: "Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan and the She-Devil ." According to modern sources, producer Sol Lesser used footage from RKO's 1934 release Wild Cargo , a jungle documentary (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ), in this picture. Tarzan and the She-Devil marked Lex Barker's last appearance as "Tarzan." For more information about the series, see the entry for Tarzan, the Ape Man in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and the entry for Tarzan Triumphs in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Tarzan and the Vampire and Tarzan and the Ivory Thieves . The film's title card reads: "Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan and the She-Devil ." According to modern sources, producer Sol Lesser used footage from RKO's 1934 release Wild Cargo , a jungle documentary (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ), in this picture. Tarzan and the She-Devil marked Lex Barker's last appearance as "Tarzan." For more information about the series, see the entry for Tarzan, the Ape Man in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and the entry for Tarzan Triumphs in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Jul 1953.
---
Daily Variety
12 Sep 1952.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jun 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Jul 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Oct 52
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 52
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 52
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Jul 53
p. 1718.
Variety
24 Jun 53
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd tech
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan and the She-Devil
Tarzan and the Ivory Thieves
Tarzan and the Vampire
Release Date:
8 June 1953
Production Date:
mid Oct--mid Nov 1952 at RKO Pathé Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Sol Lesser Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 June 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2760
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74-76
Length(in feet):
6,833
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16216
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In an African jungle, while their native porters lug a load of elephant tusks to the city of Dagar, ivory hunters Vargo and Philippe Lavar discuss their next, big excursion. Having located an enormous but dangerously remote herd of elephants, Lavar and Vargo plan to capture and enslave members of the sturdy Laikopos tribe, then force them to carry the valuable tusks. While Lavar takes off to track the herd and establish a camp, Vargo continues to Dagar to deliver the tusks to Lyra, an exotic, rich French woman, and her husband Fidel. Hoping for financial backing, Vargo tells Lyra and Fidel about the herd and the proposed enslavement. Although Fidel declares Vargo's scheme preposterous, Lyra is intrigued and orders her right-hand man Maka to organize the expedition. After the Laikopos men are captured, the women rush to tell their friend Tarzan and his wife Jane about the kidnapping. Tarzan and his companion, chimpanzee Cheetah, leave immediately for Dagar and, while Vargo's men are distracted by a seductive dancer, knock out some of the guards, steal a stash of rifles and free the Laikopos. As they are sneaking away, however, they are spotted, and a brawl ensues. Although Tarzan and the Laikopos eventually escape, Lyra leads her own expedition to track them down. After finding Tarzan at home, Lyra tries to hire him to guide the doomed elephants into her traps, but Tarzan orders her away. Later, in Dagar, the determined Lyra instructs Vargo to raid the Laikopos again, confident that Tarzan will come to their aid and leave Jane unprotected. Fidel then is to kidnap Jane and hold her until Tarzan gives ... +


In an African jungle, while their native porters lug a load of elephant tusks to the city of Dagar, ivory hunters Vargo and Philippe Lavar discuss their next, big excursion. Having located an enormous but dangerously remote herd of elephants, Lavar and Vargo plan to capture and enslave members of the sturdy Laikopos tribe, then force them to carry the valuable tusks. While Lavar takes off to track the herd and establish a camp, Vargo continues to Dagar to deliver the tusks to Lyra, an exotic, rich French woman, and her husband Fidel. Hoping for financial backing, Vargo tells Lyra and Fidel about the herd and the proposed enslavement. Although Fidel declares Vargo's scheme preposterous, Lyra is intrigued and orders her right-hand man Maka to organize the expedition. After the Laikopos men are captured, the women rush to tell their friend Tarzan and his wife Jane about the kidnapping. Tarzan and his companion, chimpanzee Cheetah, leave immediately for Dagar and, while Vargo's men are distracted by a seductive dancer, knock out some of the guards, steal a stash of rifles and free the Laikopos. As they are sneaking away, however, they are spotted, and a brawl ensues. Although Tarzan and the Laikopos eventually escape, Lyra leads her own expedition to track them down. After finding Tarzan at home, Lyra tries to hire him to guide the doomed elephants into her traps, but Tarzan orders her away. Later, in Dagar, the determined Lyra instructs Vargo to raid the Laikopos again, confident that Tarzan will come to their aid and leave Jane unprotected. Fidel then is to kidnap Jane and hold her until Tarzan gives in to their demands. As planned, Vargo and his men recapture the Laikopos and Tarzan, but Fidel cannot subdue Jane. During the ensuing fight, an oil lantern is knocked over, and the treetop house is engulfed in flames. Jane flees in the confusion, but soon collapses in a daze. Tarzan, meanwhile, frees himself and races home, only to discover his house destroyed and Jane apparently dead. Grief-stricken, Tarzan offers no resistance when Vargo's men come for him. Nearby, a revived Jane struggles toward the Laikopos village, but after being menaced by crocodiles and snakes, falls unconscious again. A passing elephant sees her and carries her in his tusks to the village, where the women take her to the tribal medicine man. In Dagar, meanwhile, Vargo whips the emotionally numb, chained Tarzan, trying to rouse him, but Tarzan barely reacts to the beating. Even the resourceful Cheetah fails to stir Tarzan to action. Soon after, Vargo, Fidel and their enslaved porters return to the jungle and eventually arrive at Lavar's camp. Meanwhile, in the Laikopos village, Jane is nursed back to consciousness and, when she wakens, calls out for Tarzan. At the same moment, a sleeping Tarzan also wakens and loudly cries Jane's name. As punishment for his outburst, Vargo puts Tarzan alone in a pen and denies him food and water. Later, as the Laikopos are building huge pens to house the elephants, Fidel leaves to do some hunting, and his rifle shots cause the animals to stampede. Furious, Vargo demands that Fidel return to Dagar, but just before Fidel departs, he overhears Vargo and Lavar plotting to steal his and Lyra's share. In Dagar, a fully recuperated Jane confronts Lyra, who informs her that Tarzan is deep in the jungle. Jane hurries off to find Tarzan, and after Lyra learns about Vargo's betrayal from Fidel, decides once again to imprison Jane to get to Tarzan. Jane is soon captured and taken to the still-grieving Tarzan in camp. Lyra then tells Tarzan that if he wants to see Jane again, he must lead the elephants into the pens. Though Tarzan at first appears to be cooperating with Lyra, he calls the elephants in a way that makes them stampede toward the camp. In the ensuing panic, Tarzan frees Jane, while Fidel accidentally shoots Lyra. After Fidel, Vargo and Lavar are trampled to death by the elephants, Tarzan and Jane embrace, as a happy Cheetah looks on. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.