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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Two Sisters from Seattle and Those Sisters from Seattle. Although the picture was shot in 3-D, the viewed print was in standard format. As noted by reviews, the film was the first 3-D, stereo musical. Cynthia and Kay Bell, who played "Connie Edmonds" and "Nell Edmonds," respectively, were billed onscreen as The Bell Sisters. Popular singers Guy Mitchell (1925--1999) and Teresa Brewer (1931--2007) made their feature-film debuts in the picture; Those Redheads from Seattle was the only feature film Brewer made.
       According to publicity materials contained in the film’s copyright record, location shooting took place in the Colorado Rockies. HR news items added the following actors to the cast: Beverly Cottrell, Danny Scharf, Al Hill, Max Wagner and Ed Mitchell. HR also noted that Lyle Moraine, Bob Hope’s stand-in, was to make his screen debut in the picture. The appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Two Sisters from Seattle and Those Sisters from Seattle. Although the picture was shot in 3-D, the viewed print was in standard format. As noted by reviews, the film was the first 3-D, stereo musical. Cynthia and Kay Bell, who played "Connie Edmonds" and "Nell Edmonds," respectively, were billed onscreen as The Bell Sisters. Popular singers Guy Mitchell (1925--1999) and Teresa Brewer (1931--2007) made their feature-film debuts in the picture; Those Redheads from Seattle was the only feature film Brewer made.
       According to publicity materials contained in the film’s copyright record, location shooting took place in the Colorado Rockies. HR news items added the following actors to the cast: Beverly Cottrell, Danny Scharf, Al Hill, Max Wagner and Ed Mitchell. HR also noted that Lyle Moraine, Bob Hope’s stand-in, was to make his screen debut in the picture. The appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 Sep 1953.
---
Daily Variety
23 Sep 1953
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Oct 1953
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 1953
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1953
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 1953
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1953
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 1953
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1953
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1953
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1953
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1953
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1953
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 1953
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Sep 1953
p. 2006.
New York Times
1 Oct 1953
p. 34.
Variety
22 Sep 1953
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Wrt for the screen by
Wrt for the screen by
Wrt for the screen by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus score
Vocal adpt
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Mus numbers created and staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Beautiful Dreamer" by Stephen Foster.
SONGS
"Baby, Baby, Baby," words and music by Mack David and Jerry Livingston
"Chick-a-Boom," words and music by Bob Merrill
"I Guess It Was You All the Time," words and music by Johnny Mercer and Hoagy Carmichael
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SONGS
"Baby, Baby, Baby," words and music by Mack David and Jerry Livingston
"Chick-a-Boom," words and music by Bob Merrill
"I Guess It Was You All the Time," words and music by Johnny Mercer and Hoagy Carmichael
"Mr. Banjo Man," words and music by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
"Take Back Your Gold," words and music by M. H. Rosenfeld and Louis W. Pritzkow.
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DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Those Sisters from Seattle
Two Sisters from Seattle
Release Date:
October 1953
Premiere Information:
Seattle premiere: 23 September 1953
New York opening: 30 September 1953
Los Angeles opening: 14 October 1953
Production Date:
mid March--late April 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1953
Copyright Number:
LP3962
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
3-D
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18551
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1898, in Dawson, Yukon Territory, Johnny Kisco’s proposed Klondike Club comes under attack by Vance Edmonds, the publisher of The Daily Breeze newspaper. To silence Vance, Mike Yurkil, Kisco’s partner, sets his warehouse on fire, but Vance manages to get the paper out despite the setback. Yurkil then shoots Vance as he is going to mail a letter to his family in Seattle. Later, in Seattle, Mrs. Edmonds and her daughters—redheads Kathie, Pat and Connie, and young blonde Nell—read the letter, unaware that Vance has been shot. After Mrs. Edmonds reads that because of financial setbacks, Vance cannot send for them, she decides to pack up her family and go to Dawson anyway. By the time they reach Skagway, Alaska, the women have run out of money but are befriended by song-and-dance man Joe Keenan. Unknown to the Edmonds family, Joe is a friend of Johnny and is headed for Dawson to work in his club. When Johnny arrives to pick up Joe, having driven his dog sleds from Dawson, Joe pleads with him to give the Edmonds women a lift. Although attracted to the pretty sisters, Johnny is reluctant to become involved until Joe privately reminds him that, as Kisco’s partner, he is somewhat responsible for their fate. Johnny decides to wait to tell them about Vance, who was still alive when he left Dawson, and loads them and their pregnant cat onto his two sleds. Pat, an aspiring singer, flirts with Johnny, but Johnny prefers the more sedate Kathie, and the two grow close during the trip. Johnny cannot bring himself ... +


In 1898, in Dawson, Yukon Territory, Johnny Kisco’s proposed Klondike Club comes under attack by Vance Edmonds, the publisher of The Daily Breeze newspaper. To silence Vance, Mike Yurkil, Kisco’s partner, sets his warehouse on fire, but Vance manages to get the paper out despite the setback. Yurkil then shoots Vance as he is going to mail a letter to his family in Seattle. Later, in Seattle, Mrs. Edmonds and her daughters—redheads Kathie, Pat and Connie, and young blonde Nell—read the letter, unaware that Vance has been shot. After Mrs. Edmonds reads that because of financial setbacks, Vance cannot send for them, she decides to pack up her family and go to Dawson anyway. By the time they reach Skagway, Alaska, the women have run out of money but are befriended by song-and-dance man Joe Keenan. Unknown to the Edmonds family, Joe is a friend of Johnny and is headed for Dawson to work in his club. When Johnny arrives to pick up Joe, having driven his dog sleds from Dawson, Joe pleads with him to give the Edmonds women a lift. Although attracted to the pretty sisters, Johnny is reluctant to become involved until Joe privately reminds him that, as Kisco’s partner, he is somewhat responsible for their fate. Johnny decides to wait to tell them about Vance, who was still alive when he left Dawson, and loads them and their pregnant cat onto his two sleds. Pat, an aspiring singer, flirts with Johnny, but Johnny prefers the more sedate Kathie, and the two grow close during the trip. Johnny cannot bring himself to say anything about Vance, and when the family arrives in Dawson, they check into the hotel where Vance was staying, expecting to surprise him. After learning that Vance is dead and Yurkil, whom Vance discovered is an ex-convict, has fled, Johnny asks Rev. Petrie to give the women the bad news, then goes to celebrate the opening of his club with saloon girl Liz. Johnny does send the lobster he had shipped from Seattle to the Edmonds women, and a grief-stricken Kathie cries on his shoulder. Later, at the Breeze office, the women learn that a buyer for the paper will take several weeks to find. To make ends meet during their stay, Mrs. Edmonds advertises herself as a dressmaker and Kathie a typist, while Connie, a nurse, takes a job in the local infirmary and Pat sings in the church. Anxious to help, Johnny pays Liz to order dresses from the incompetent Mrs. Edmonds and buys the cat’s kittens for $100. Joe, who is in love with Connie, then suggests to Pat that she sing at the Klondike Club, and even though she knows her mother, a lover of classical music, would disapprove, Pat agrees. Soon after, Mack Donahue approaches Mrs. Edmonds about buying the paper, and when Dan Taylor, the printer, informs her that Donahue is Johnny’s faro dealer and that Johnny’s partner shot her husband, she assumes that Johnny is trying to get rid of her. Disbelieving, Kathie goes to question Johnny at the club and arrives just as he is being kissed by a grateful Pat. Now convinced that Johnny was involved in her father’s murder and is corrupting Pat, Kathie slaps him and storms out. After Pat tells her family that she is singing at the Klondike, no matter what, Kathie proposes that she and Mrs. Edmonds start up the paper again and move into the office to save money. While the Breeze prints editorials condemning Johnny, Kathie begins a romance with Rev. Petrie, and Pat becomes the Klondike’s star attraction, along with Joe. Joe’s affliation with Johnny, however, jeopardizes his relationship with Connie, and he finally tells Johnny he is quitting. Pat then overhears Johnny say that he loves Kathie but knows she will not stop attacking him until he leaves town. After Kathie’s imminent marriage to Rev. Petrie is announced, Johnny sells the club and, as Kathie as is being fitted in her wedding dress, drunkenly informs her that he is going to Fairbanks, where, he knows, Yurkil is running a saloon. Kathie cries at the news, and later, Pat tells her that Johnny loves her and if she does not go after him, Pat will. Still wearing her wedding dress, Kathie runs to the docks to catch Johnny but arrives too late. In Fairbanks, Johnny finds Yurkil’s saloon, but Yurkil slips out the back to avoid seeing him. After Johnny learns from Yurkil’s partner that Yurkil has gone to the snowbound Frazer’s Diggings, he tracks him there and confronts him at gunpoint. The two men exchange gunfire in the snowy wilderness until Yurkil finally is buried in an avalanche. Johnny rescues him and, back in Fairbanks, Yurkil confesses his crimes, then dies. Kathie, who has followed Johnny to Fairbanks, arrives in time to overhear the confession and gives Johnny a loving hug.





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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.