Rhapsody (1954)

115 mins | Romance | 16 April 1954

Full page view
HISTORY

The two writing teams are listed in the opening credits as "Fay and Michael Kanin" and "Ruth and Augustus Goetz." A 7 Apr 1953 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column stated that Anne Francis was testing for a role, but she was not in the film. According to pre-production news items, Paramount purchased Henry Handel Richardson's novel in Dec 1951, and later assigned it to producer Bernard Smith and director Charles Vidor. M-G-M acquired the completed screenplay in Dec 1952. According to the HCN review, Vidor incorporated background shots of Paris, Zurich and St. Moritz "to recreate an authentic European atmosphere." Michael Rabin, who performed the violin solos heard in the film, was seventeen years old at the time of production. According to a 20 Jul 1953 HR news item, Norma Nevens, who had a bit part in the film, was the daughter of M-G-M producer Lawrence ... More Less

The two writing teams are listed in the opening credits as "Fay and Michael Kanin" and "Ruth and Augustus Goetz." A 7 Apr 1953 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column stated that Anne Francis was testing for a role, but she was not in the film. According to pre-production news items, Paramount purchased Henry Handel Richardson's novel in Dec 1951, and later assigned it to producer Bernard Smith and director Charles Vidor. M-G-M acquired the completed screenplay in Dec 1952. According to the HCN review, Vidor incorporated background shots of Paris, Zurich and St. Moritz "to recreate an authentic European atmosphere." Michael Rabin, who performed the violin solos heard in the film, was seventeen years old at the time of production. According to a 20 Jul 1953 HR news item, Norma Nevens, who had a bit part in the film, was the daughter of M-G-M producer Lawrence Weingarten. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Feb 1954.
---
Daily Variety
16 Feb 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Feb 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Citizen-News
3 Apr 1954.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 53
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 53
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 53
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 54
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Feb 1954.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Feb 54
p. 2181.
New York Times
12 Mar 54
p. 17.
Newsweek
8 Mar 1954.
---
Variety
9 Jan 1952.
---
Variety
17 Feb 54
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost des
MUSIC
Mus and orch dir
Mus adpt
Piano supv
Violin supv
Piano solos played by
Violin solos played by
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Mont seq
MAKEUP
Hair styles
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Maurice Guest by Henry Handel Richardson (New York, 1908).
MUSIC
Violin Concerto in D Major by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor by Sergei Rachmaninoff
"Gypsy Airs" by Pablo Sarasate.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 April 1954
Premiere Information:
World premiere in New York: 11 March 1954
Production Date:
early June--10 August 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 February 1954
Copyright Number:
LP3872
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
115
Length(in feet):
10,394
Length(in reels):
14
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16688
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

At their villa in the south of France, beautiful, spoiled young Louise Durant informs her wealthy father Nicholas that she is going to the music conservatory in Zurich to study piano and be near her beau, Paul Bronte, a violinist in his final year of study. The headstrong Louise adds that she plans to marry Paul, although he does not know this yet. In Zurich, Louise rents an apartment from Frau Sigerist, and meets fellow tenant James Guest, an American studying piano on the G.I. Bill. The following morning, Louise auditions for Prof. Schuman and, acknowledging her unexceptional talent, tells him she wants to study at the conservatory to be near the man she loves. When the kindly professor cautions her that great musicians do not always make good husbands, Louise confesses that she does not share Paul's passion for music. Schuman then tells Paul that he has chosen him to perform the violin solo in Tchaikovsky's Concerto in D Major with the Zurich Philharmonic. Paul leaves Louise alone in Schuman's waiting room for hours while he practices the piece, and she finally gets angry and walks out. Paul finds Louise in her room packing, and although she is disheartened by the thought of always coming second to Paul's music, he persuades her to stay. Louise strikes up a friendship with James, and allows him to use her piano to practice. One day, Louise gets a telegram from her father asking her to join him in St. Moritz, and brings Paul with her. Nicholas concedes that the young man has a certain "arrogant charm," but warns Louise that Paul will never need her as much as she desires. As ... +


At their villa in the south of France, beautiful, spoiled young Louise Durant informs her wealthy father Nicholas that she is going to the music conservatory in Zurich to study piano and be near her beau, Paul Bronte, a violinist in his final year of study. The headstrong Louise adds that she plans to marry Paul, although he does not know this yet. In Zurich, Louise rents an apartment from Frau Sigerist, and meets fellow tenant James Guest, an American studying piano on the G.I. Bill. The following morning, Louise auditions for Prof. Schuman and, acknowledging her unexceptional talent, tells him she wants to study at the conservatory to be near the man she loves. When the kindly professor cautions her that great musicians do not always make good husbands, Louise confesses that she does not share Paul's passion for music. Schuman then tells Paul that he has chosen him to perform the violin solo in Tchaikovsky's Concerto in D Major with the Zurich Philharmonic. Paul leaves Louise alone in Schuman's waiting room for hours while he practices the piece, and she finally gets angry and walks out. Paul finds Louise in her room packing, and although she is disheartened by the thought of always coming second to Paul's music, he persuades her to stay. Louise strikes up a friendship with James, and allows him to use her piano to practice. One day, Louise gets a telegram from her father asking her to join him in St. Moritz, and brings Paul with her. Nicholas concedes that the young man has a certain "arrogant charm," but warns Louise that Paul will never need her as much as she desires. As the date of his concert debut grows nearer, Paul gets into an argument with the conductor at a rehearsal, and when Schuman reproaches him, he walks out in anger. When Louise tries to console him, Paul bitterly blames himself for being unprepared. Schuman gives Paul another chance, and Paul tells Louise they must not see each other until after the concert. Louise reluctantly consents, and the lovers speak only on the phone during Paul's intensive rehearsal period. The night of the concert, Paul performs with great passion, and is so much in demand after the show that Louise is again left waiting alone. Paul's career is immediately launched, but Louise feels excluded and takes no pleasure in his success. When Paul tells her he must continue to focus on his work, they quarrel and Louise walks out. From her apartment that night, Louise sees Paul kiss a pretty conservatory student and drive away with her. Later that night, Frau Sigerist hears a noise coming from Louise's room and goes to James for help. James breaks down the door, and they find Louise on the floor, unconscious from taking an overdose of pills. Nicholas is summoned, and is impressed by James's devotion to Louise during her recovery. When she is well again, Louise prepares to join her father in Paris. James asks her to stay, and although the now-hardened Louise lightly dismisses his protestations of love, his desperation moves her. Time passes, and Paul tours the world as a concert violinist. One day, after encountering Nicholas on the street in Paris, Paul calls Louise at the Ritz, and she happily agrees to meet him. While waiting for her in the bar, Paul sees James at a booth, drunk and miserable. Paul is surprised to learn that James married Louise several weeks earlier, and leaves the bar in disgust. Louise seeks Paul out at the concert hall and offers to divorce James, but while he admits he still loves her, he rejects her offer. A conversation with Nicholas convinces Louise that she needs to redeem herself in Paul's eyes by helping James, and she tells her husband they must go back to Zurich. James returns to the conservatory, and Louise patiently supports him through his long hours of practice. In time, James's first concert appearance is announced, and Louise sends her father a flyer with a note saying she wishes Paul knew she did it all for him. Nicholas passes the flyer to Paul after a concert, and Paul is pleased by the change in Louise. Soon afterward, Louise comes home and finds a letter slipped under her door. On the evening of James's concert debut, Louise tells him she is going away with Paul after the concert, and implores James to see that he can succeed without her. Despite his obvious suffering, James plays brilliantly, unaware that Louise is watching him from the back of the auditorium. Paul comes for Louise and finds her watching her husband with great emotion. After the concert, James is standing on the empty stage when Louise appears and rushes into his arms. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.