Rose Marie (1954)

103-104 mins | Musical, Romance | 19 March 1954

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Cinematographer:

Paul C. Vogel

Editor:

Harold F. Kress

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Merrill Pye

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Indian Love Call . The film carries no individual producer credit. Pre-production news items named Arthur Hornblow, Jr. as the film's producer. According to a 27 Jan 1954 HR news item, Hornblow and Larry Weingarten worked as producers in the film's early stages, while LeRoy supervised the initial editing of the film and Jack Cummings oversaw the final editing. Neither LeRoy nor Hornblow made another film for M-G-M after Rose Marie .
       The end credits include a statement thanking the government of Canada for its cooperation during the making of the film. Portions of the film were shot on location in Mammoth Lakes, CA and Jasper Park in Alberta, Canada. A 1 Jun 1953 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column stated that Leslie Caron had been cast as "Wanda," the Indian maiden. A HR news item adds Russell Conklin to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Composer Rudolf Friml collaborated on three new songs for this film: "Free to Be Free," "I Have the Love" and "The Right Place for a Girl."
       M-G-M made two earlier films based on the operetta Rose Marie . The 1928 film Rose-Marie , directed by Lucien Hubbard, starred Joan Crawford and James Murray; the 1936 musical of the same title was directed by W. S. Van Dyke and starred Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. The plots of the earlier films differed somewhat from each other and from the 1954 version. Reviews alluded to the earlier films, and the New Yorker review commented that Rose Marie , ... More Less

The working title of this film was Indian Love Call . The film carries no individual producer credit. Pre-production news items named Arthur Hornblow, Jr. as the film's producer. According to a 27 Jan 1954 HR news item, Hornblow and Larry Weingarten worked as producers in the film's early stages, while LeRoy supervised the initial editing of the film and Jack Cummings oversaw the final editing. Neither LeRoy nor Hornblow made another film for M-G-M after Rose Marie .
       The end credits include a statement thanking the government of Canada for its cooperation during the making of the film. Portions of the film were shot on location in Mammoth Lakes, CA and Jasper Park in Alberta, Canada. A 1 Jun 1953 item in HR 's "Rambling Reporter" column stated that Leslie Caron had been cast as "Wanda," the Indian maiden. A HR news item adds Russell Conklin to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Composer Rudolf Friml collaborated on three new songs for this film: "Free to Be Free," "I Have the Love" and "The Right Place for a Girl."
       M-G-M made two earlier films based on the operetta Rose Marie . The 1928 film Rose-Marie , directed by Lucien Hubbard, starred Joan Crawford and James Murray; the 1936 musical of the same title was directed by W. S. Van Dyke and starred Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. The plots of the earlier films differed somewhat from each other and from the 1954 version. Reviews alluded to the earlier films, and the New Yorker review commented that Rose Marie , "which was hot stuff back in the twenties, is with us once again, and it has no way improved with age and CinemaScope." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Mar 1954.
---
Daily Variety
3 Mar 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Mar 54
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 52
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 53
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 53
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 53
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 53
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 53
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 53
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 54
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 54
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 54
p. 3.
Los Angeles Daily News
13 Mar 1954.
---
Motion Picture Daily
3 Mar 1954.
---
Motion Picture Herald
6 Mar 1954.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Mar 54
p. 2205.
New York Times
2 Apr 54
p. 22.
New Yorker
17 Oct 1954.
---
Time
15 Mar 1954.
---
Variety
3 Mar 54
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mervyn LeRoy Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch
Vocal supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Mont seq
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Hair styles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the operetta Rose-Marie , music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart, libretto by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II, as presented by Arthur Hammerstein (New York, 2 Sep 1924).
SONGS
"Free to Be Free," "I Have the Love" and "The Right Place for a Girl," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
"I'm a Mountie Who Never Got His Man," music by George Stoll, lyrics by George Stoll and Herbert Baker
"Rose Marie" and "The Mounties," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hamerstein II, additional lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
+
SONGS
"Free to Be Free," "I Have the Love" and "The Right Place for a Girl," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
"I'm a Mountie Who Never Got His Man," music by George Stoll, lyrics by George Stoll and Herbert Baker
"Rose Marie" and "The Mounties," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hamerstein II, additional lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
"Indian Love Call," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II
"Totem Tom-Tom," music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II
"Alouette," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Indian Love Call
Release Date:
19 March 1954
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Chicago, IL: 3 March 1954
Detroit, MI opening: 5 March 1954
Production Date:
10 August--early October 1953
addl seq 29 January 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
3 March 1954
Copyright Number:
LP3873
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
103-104
Length(in feet):
9,344
Length(in reels):
13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16745
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In the woods of Canada, Sgt. Mike Malone of the Royal Canadian Mounties tracks down a young French Canadian woman, Rose Marie Lemaitre, and tells her he promised her late father he would take her to Fort Macroy. After attempting to flee, Rose Marie begs Mike to let her remain in the wilderness that has always been her home, but he maintains that the rough life of the woods is not suitable for a girl. Mike introduces Rose Marie to the other men that night at dinner, but when she rebelliously dumps a bowl of soup on his head and bites him, Mike locks her in the brig, under the supervision of the hapless Barney McCorkle, the oldest corporal in the Mounties. Gradually, however, Rose Marie settles into her new life with the Mounties and develops an affection for Mike. One day, Inspector Appleby comes to review Mike's troops, and is appalled to find Rose Marie in uniform. Appleby upbraids Mike for letting a woman live with the Mounties, and Mike admits he has only ever thought of Rose Marie as a child. Appleby proposes that Rose Marie be sent to live with his cousin in Maple Rock, but she refuses to give up her freedom to live like a lady, and runs away. Mike goes after her and explains that she is becoming a beautiful woman and will someday be interested in men. While riding back to the fort, Mike and Rose Marie encounter renegade trapper James Severn Duval, and Rose Marie is attracted to him at once. Mike takes Rose Marie to the Northern Lights Hotel in Maple Rock, and delivers her into the care of bawdy ... +


In the woods of Canada, Sgt. Mike Malone of the Royal Canadian Mounties tracks down a young French Canadian woman, Rose Marie Lemaitre, and tells her he promised her late father he would take her to Fort Macroy. After attempting to flee, Rose Marie begs Mike to let her remain in the wilderness that has always been her home, but he maintains that the rough life of the woods is not suitable for a girl. Mike introduces Rose Marie to the other men that night at dinner, but when she rebelliously dumps a bowl of soup on his head and bites him, Mike locks her in the brig, under the supervision of the hapless Barney McCorkle, the oldest corporal in the Mounties. Gradually, however, Rose Marie settles into her new life with the Mounties and develops an affection for Mike. One day, Inspector Appleby comes to review Mike's troops, and is appalled to find Rose Marie in uniform. Appleby upbraids Mike for letting a woman live with the Mounties, and Mike admits he has only ever thought of Rose Marie as a child. Appleby proposes that Rose Marie be sent to live with his cousin in Maple Rock, but she refuses to give up her freedom to live like a lady, and runs away. Mike goes after her and explains that she is becoming a beautiful woman and will someday be interested in men. While riding back to the fort, Mike and Rose Marie encounter renegade trapper James Severn Duval, and Rose Marie is attracted to him at once. Mike takes Rose Marie to the Northern Lights Hotel in Maple Rock, and delivers her into the care of bawdy proprietress Lady Jane Dunstock. Jane treats Rose Marie like a daughter and gives her lessons in dressing and behaving like a young lady. One day, Rose Marie sees James in the street and invites him to a dance that evening. James then visits an Indian village, where he is greeted by Wanda, a pretty young woman who is in love with him. James calls on Chief Black Eagle, who frowns on the white man's friendship with Wanda, and gives him the money the chief requested the previous year for a piece of land on the river. When Black Eagle tells him the price of the land has now doubled, James angrily vows to return with the money. That night, James steals the money collected at the dance, but when Rose Marie tells him the money was for charity, he gives it back. Late that night, Rose Marie sneaks away to the woods and finds James, and they begin to fall in love. James returns to Black Eagle and proposes that the chief give him the land in exchange for half of the mineral rights, but Black Eagle refuses. Mike is waiting outside when James leaves the chief's tent, and warns him to stay away from Rose Marie. Mike later calls on Rose Marie and proposes. Rose Marie confesses she has never thought of him romantically, but Mike kisses her and urges her to consider his offer. That evening, James climbs up to Rose Marie's balcony and takes her to the Indian Totem Festival of Summer. While watching the native dancing, they share a passionate kiss under Wanda's jealous glare. James brings Rose Marie home and tells her he must go away to resume his trapping, and asks her to accompany him. James then retires to his shack near Jane's house, unaware that Wanda has followed him from the Indian village. Wanda creeps in and is about to stab James with his own knife when Rose Marie comes in to say she will meet James at his camp the following day. James tells Rose Marie that if she changes her mind about going away with him, she is to signal him by singing the Indian love song. When Wanda returns to the village that night, Black Eagle angrily begins to whip her, and she stabs him, then flees in horror. The Mounties are called in to investigate, and when Mike shows Rose Marie the knife used to kill the chief, she recognizes it as James's. To protect James, Rose Marie rides to the woods and tearfully sings the Indian love song to send him away. James is captured by the Indians, however, and Mike arrives just as they are starting to burn him at the stake. Mike rescues James and arrests him for murder, and the trapper is convicted and sentenced to hang. Rose Marie pleads with Mike to intervene, declaring her love for James and faith in his innocence. Although he is crushed by this revelation, Mike reexamines the case, and when he and Barney find an Indian love ring among James's effects, they suspect a jealous lover. Mike confronts Wanda and tricks her into confessing, and James is set free. For his help in solving the crime, Barney is at last promoted to sergeant. After James's release, the grateful Rose Marie tells Mike she will do anything he wishes. Mike tells Rose Marie to put on her buckskins and go for a ride with him. In the wilderness, he tells Rose Marie she was not meant to be confined in a town, and sends her off to be with James. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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