Robbers' Roost (1955)

82-83 mins | Western | May 1955

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HISTORY

The opening title cards of this film read: “A Leonard Goldstein Production George Montgomery in Zane Grey’s Robbers’ Roost .” Grey’s novel was serialized in Collier’s (11 Oct—27 Dec 1930). According to a 16 Jun 1953 HR news item, writer-director Sidney Salkow originally purchased the rights to Grey’s novel from his son, Romer Grey, and intended to produce the picture independently, in association with Romer. A 16 Nov 1954 HR news item include Charles Rooner and Fernando Wagner in the cast, but their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. HR news items noted that the picture was shot on location in Durango, Mexico. Grey’s novel was also used as the basis for the 1933 Fox Film Corp. release Robbers’ Roost , which was directed by Louis King and starred George O’Brien and Maureen O’Sullivan (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ... More Less

The opening title cards of this film read: “A Leonard Goldstein Production George Montgomery in Zane Grey’s Robbers’ Roost .” Grey’s novel was serialized in Collier’s (11 Oct—27 Dec 1930). According to a 16 Jun 1953 HR news item, writer-director Sidney Salkow originally purchased the rights to Grey’s novel from his son, Romer Grey, and intended to produce the picture independently, in association with Romer. A 16 Nov 1954 HR news item include Charles Rooner and Fernando Wagner in the cast, but their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. HR news items noted that the picture was shot on location in Durango, Mexico. Grey’s novel was also used as the basis for the 1933 Fox Film Corp. release Robbers’ Roost , which was directed by Louis King and starred George O’Brien and Maureen O’Sullivan (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 May 1955.
---
Daily Variety
9 May 55
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 May 55
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1953.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1954
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1954
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1954
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 1954
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 55
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 May 55
p. 434.
Variety
11 May 55
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Leonard Goldstein Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Incidental mus
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Robbers' Roost by Zane Grey (New York, 1932).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"This Is the Night" and "I Turned It Down," music by Tony Romano, lyrics by John Bradford
"Robbers' Roost," music by Tony Romano, lyrics by John Bradford and Barbara Hayden.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Zane Grey's Robbers' Roost
Release Date:
May 1955
Production Date:
2 November--late November 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Goldstein-Jacks Productions
Copyright Date:
31 May 1955
Copyright Number:
LP4857
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Color
photographed in Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
82-83
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17029
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When lone rider Tex arrives in the small western town of Junta Grande, he becomes embroiled in a feud between cattle rustlers Hank Hays and Heesman. After Tex helps Hays to intimidate Heesman into leaving town, Hays offers him a job at the ranch owned by Bull Herrick, a cattleman who recently suffered a crippling accident and is now in a wheelchair. Upon their arrival at Herrick’s ranch, however, Hays and his men discover that the wily Herrick has also hired Heesman as a foreman in the hope that Hays and Heesman will be too busy fighting each other to rustle his herd. The following day, Herrick sends Tex into town to meet his sister Helen, who is returning home from the East. Helen is also greeted by wealthy Robert Bell, who, years earlier, had tried to “buy” Helen by offering to help the struggling Herrick if he gave him Helen’s hand in marriage. Helen reacts coolly to Bell’s assertion that his feelings for her remain the same, then goes to the ranch, where she attempts to persuade Herrick to go East with her for better medical care. Herrick refuses, however, and when Helen expresses concern over his hiring practices, Herrick insists that one must “set a thief to catch a thief.” As the weeks pass, Helen attracts unwanted attention from the gunslingers, and after Tex prevents Smokey Joe, one of Hays’s henchman, from harassing her, Herrick orders Tex to protect Helen. One night, Hays tricks Heesman by pretending to leave, then, after Heesman’s gang have saddled up to rustle the cattle, returns to laugh at them. Soon after, Bell arrives and offers to help Herrick, but both ... +


When lone rider Tex arrives in the small western town of Junta Grande, he becomes embroiled in a feud between cattle rustlers Hank Hays and Heesman. After Tex helps Hays to intimidate Heesman into leaving town, Hays offers him a job at the ranch owned by Bull Herrick, a cattleman who recently suffered a crippling accident and is now in a wheelchair. Upon their arrival at Herrick’s ranch, however, Hays and his men discover that the wily Herrick has also hired Heesman as a foreman in the hope that Hays and Heesman will be too busy fighting each other to rustle his herd. The following day, Herrick sends Tex into town to meet his sister Helen, who is returning home from the East. Helen is also greeted by wealthy Robert Bell, who, years earlier, had tried to “buy” Helen by offering to help the struggling Herrick if he gave him Helen’s hand in marriage. Helen reacts coolly to Bell’s assertion that his feelings for her remain the same, then goes to the ranch, where she attempts to persuade Herrick to go East with her for better medical care. Herrick refuses, however, and when Helen expresses concern over his hiring practices, Herrick insists that one must “set a thief to catch a thief.” As the weeks pass, Helen attracts unwanted attention from the gunslingers, and after Tex prevents Smokey Joe, one of Hays’s henchman, from harassing her, Herrick orders Tex to protect Helen. One night, Hays tricks Heesman by pretending to leave, then, after Heesman’s gang have saddled up to rustle the cattle, returns to laugh at them. Soon after, Bell arrives and offers to help Herrick, but both he and Helen are wary, despite Bell’s assertion that there are no strings attached. The next day, Tex, wins another fierce fistfight in order to protect Helen, and she begins to think that he is different from the other men. That night, Hays and Heesman agree to rustle the cattle together, a few hundred at a time, and split the profits, rather than continue fighting each other. While the rustlers are putting their plan into action, Helen and Herrick are again visited by Bell, who insults Herrick for turning down his proposal. The angry Herrick is injured when he lunges at Bell, and Tex helps Helen care for her brother until Dr. Beebe arrives. The doctor warns them that Herrick is dangerously ill, but Tex lies to Hays, telling him that Herrick will recover soon, hoping thereby to keep the outlaws under control. Tex suggests to Helen that she could dismiss the men if she sold the herd immediately, and the next day, she goes into town to find a buyer. Hays sees her there and upon his return to the ranch, upbraids Tex for letting Helen leave the ranch. Meanwhile, Helen has spotted a wanted poster for Tex, whose real name is Jim Wall, for the murder of two men. As Hays and his men begin preparations to steal the rest of the herd that evening, Helen returns and warns Tex to leave before she sends word to the sheriff of his true identity. In response, Tex asserts that she would have turned him in immediately if she did not have feelings for him, but after Tex kisses her, Helen slaps him and stalks off. Soon after, Hays and his men get Heesman’s gang drunk and tie them to their bunks, then steal the cattle. While Hays's gang forces Tex to accompany them to the cattle buyer, Hays and one of his men, Sparrow, kidnap Helen and join the others later. Although the men protest that Helen’s abduction will incite the townspeople, Hays insists on keeping her. Early the next morning, Beebe discovers Helen’s absence, but after he frees Heesman, the outlaw shoots him, then chases Hays. When Beebe’s riderless horse returns to town, the sheriff and his posse begin hunting the outlaws. Hays and his men reach their desert hideout and set up camp, and there, Tex continues trying to protect Helen, even though she no longer trusts him. Early one morning, Tex sneaks into the corral to steal a horse for Helen, but when she refuses to leave with him, Tex knocks her unconscious and rides off with her. Hays soon awakens, however, and the men chase after Tex. When the outlaws shoot at Tex, the noise alerts both Heesman and the sheriff to their position. After Tex and Helen are forced to abandon their horses and climb up into the rocks, the rustlers find themselves fighting each other and the posse. Hays pursues Tex and Helen, but after Tex captures him, Helen is amazed to hear Tex accuse him of pillaging his ranch and raping and killing his wife. Just then, one of Hays’s men surprises Helen, enabling Hays to disarm Tex, but Helen succeeds in starting a rockslide that buries Hays and his men. After the sheriff has apprehended the remaining outlaws and uncovered Hays, the dying rustler tells the sheriff that Tex never intentionally committed murder, but was justified in killing the men who helped to burn his ranch. With his name cleared, Tex rides off with Helen to begin a new life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.