Fury at Gunsight Pass (1956)

66 mins | Western | February 1956

Director:

Fred F. Sears

Writer:

David Lang

Producer:

Wallace MacDonald

Cinematographer:

Fred Jackman Jr.

Production Designer:

George Brooks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Law of Gunsight Pass . Although a HR production chart places Robert Foulk in the cast, his appearance in the released film has not been ... More Less

The working title of this film was Law of Gunsight Pass . Although a HR production chart places Robert Foulk in the cast, his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jan 1956.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jan 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Jan 56
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1955
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 56
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Jan 56
p. 737.
Variety
18 Jan 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Law of Gunsight Pass
Release Date:
February 1956
Production Date:
26 July--6 August 1955
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 January 1956
Copyright Number:
LP5782
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
66
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17716
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Whitey Turner, a member of a band of outlaws led by Dirk Hogan, poses as a potential bank depositor in order to scout out the Bank of Gunsight Pass. With the aid of Peter Boggs, the owner of the town wedding chapel and funeral parlor, the gang plans to steal the $35,000 deposited by the Mormon Church on the day that the bank president’s son, Roy Hanford, is to marry Kathy Phillips. On the day of the wedding, Dirk tells Whitey and three other members of the gang to ride into town at noon, one hour before the time of the robbery. On the way to town, Whitey persuades his compatriots to steal the money before Dirk and the others arrive, thus assuring themselves a bigger cut. Their plan goes awry, however, when Roy’s father Charles closes the bank for the wedding and the reverend arrives late for the ceremony, delaying the proceedings. As precious minutes tick past, Whitey and his men wait in the local saloon. Fifteen minutes before Dirk is to arrive, the ceremony ends and the guests stream into the saloon for the reception. After Whitey anxiously requests that Hanford immediately reopen the bank so that he can withdraw his deposit, Andrew Ferguson, the bank’s vice-president, offers to accommodate Whitey. When Hanford, stating that he changed the safe combination that morning, insists on accompanying Whitey to the bank, Andy, a crotchety old man who still holds a grudge against Hanford for youthful gambling indiscretions, becomes suspicious. Once Hanford opens the safe, Whitey pulls out his gun and demands the church’s money. Wary, Andy follows them to ... +


Whitey Turner, a member of a band of outlaws led by Dirk Hogan, poses as a potential bank depositor in order to scout out the Bank of Gunsight Pass. With the aid of Peter Boggs, the owner of the town wedding chapel and funeral parlor, the gang plans to steal the $35,000 deposited by the Mormon Church on the day that the bank president’s son, Roy Hanford, is to marry Kathy Phillips. On the day of the wedding, Dirk tells Whitey and three other members of the gang to ride into town at noon, one hour before the time of the robbery. On the way to town, Whitey persuades his compatriots to steal the money before Dirk and the others arrive, thus assuring themselves a bigger cut. Their plan goes awry, however, when Roy’s father Charles closes the bank for the wedding and the reverend arrives late for the ceremony, delaying the proceedings. As precious minutes tick past, Whitey and his men wait in the local saloon. Fifteen minutes before Dirk is to arrive, the ceremony ends and the guests stream into the saloon for the reception. After Whitey anxiously requests that Hanford immediately reopen the bank so that he can withdraw his deposit, Andrew Ferguson, the bank’s vice-president, offers to accommodate Whitey. When Hanford, stating that he changed the safe combination that morning, insists on accompanying Whitey to the bank, Andy, a crotchety old man who still holds a grudge against Hanford for youthful gambling indiscretions, becomes suspicious. Once Hanford opens the safe, Whitey pulls out his gun and demands the church’s money. Wary, Andy follows them to the bank, and from the window, watches as Hanford loads the money into the robbers’ satchel. As Andy calls for help, Dirk and the others arrive, sparking a shootout between the townsfolk and the outlaws. In the chaos, Okay, Okay, one of the robbers inside the bank, passes the satchel out the back door to Boggs, who scurries to the mortuary to hide it, after which he is hit and killed by a stray bullet. After Whitey shoots Hanford, Roy, followed by Sheriff Meeker, charges into the bank to arrest the four robbers, although Dirk and the others escape. When the sheriff jails the four, Andy charges that Hanford was in league with the robbers. Aware that if Hanford is implicated in the crime, no murder charges will be pressed, Whitey confirms Andy’s accusation. Soon after, the telegraph wires are mysteriously cut, and Meeker, fearing that the outlaws will return to free Whitey and the others, organizes a posse to escort the prisoners to the next town. Twelve men volunteer to join Meeker, and after they leave, the rest of the town ostracizes Roy, holding his father responsible for the robbery. Vowing to exonerate his father, Roy tells Andy that he plans to assume his father’s partnership in the bank and pay back every cent that was stolen. In the hills outside town, Dirk and his men spot the posse and string a rope across the pass, tripping the posse’s horses as they gallop through. After shooting the sheriff, Dirk takes the posse prisoner and frees Whitey. To protect himself, Whitey lies that he was forced to move up the time of the robbery upon learning that the money was to be moved out of town sooner than expected. When Whitey claims that he dropped the satchel containing the money during the shootout at the bank, Dirk insists on riding back to town to retrieve it. As a driving windstorm rakes the town, Boggs’s shrewish widow cleans up the mortuary and uncovers the satchel, which she empties into her shawl and hides under a pile of hay in the stables. Upon reaching Gunsight Pass, Dirk threatens to kill one of the townsfolk every thirty minutes unless they turn over the money. When Forrest, one of the outlaws, proposes searching Boggs’s funeral parlor, Whitey, to create a diversion, admits that Hanford was not involved in the robbery and suggests that the bank president may have locked the satchel in the vault to safeguard it. While Dirk goes to blow up the vault, Whitey, thinking that the money is still hidden in the mortuary, hurries there. In the blinding storm, Roy and Andy escape out a side door and proceed to the sheriff’s office to look for guns. Upon discovering that the outlaws have confiscated all the weapons, Andy suggests rifling their saddlebags for the weapons. At the mortuary, meanwhile, Whitey finds the satchel just as Dirk bursts in and realizes that Whitey has double-crossed him. After shooting Dirk, Whitey pries open the satchel, and when Dirk sees it is empty, he dies laughing. Running into the stables, Mrs. Boggs harnesses a team of horses, digs the money out of the hay and jumps into a wagon. Kathy, witnessing her strange behavior, alerts Roy, who runs into the stables and wrestles the shawl from her hand. Just then, Whitey fires his gun, startling the horses, which then stampede into the street, overturning the wagon and crushing Mrs. Boggs. As Whitey and Roy wrestle for the money, Andy seizes the guns from the saddlebags and distributes them to the townsfolk, enabling them to overpower the outlaws. With his father’s name cleared, Roy and Kathy leave town to start a new life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.