Magic Fire (1956)

94-95 mins | Biography, Musical | 27 April 1956

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HISTORY

The following statement appears after the opening credits: "This picture was produced at actual historical locations by the Republic Studio Organization." After the opening credits, a scrolling introduction reads as follows: "In the middle of the Nineteenth Century when the social structure of Europe was about to be reshaped, the world of music was shaken by one man Richard Wagner." The introduction then states that Wagner was born in Leipzig, Germany in 1813, the ninth child of a poor family, and that, in 1834, the Magdeburg Stage and Opera Company needed a conductor. Voice-over narration by Alan Badel as "Richard Wagner" is heard intermittently throughout the film. Cities depicted in the film are introduced with eighteenth-century drawings. Although copyright records list the film's length as 112 minutes, the print viewed was approximately 94-95 minutes, which corresponds to the running time listed in reviews. Although the MPA incorrectly reports the release date as 29 Mar 1956 and a 5 May 1956 MPHPD noted that the film was a May release, an Apr 1956 HR news item stated that it opened nationally on 27 Apr 1956.
       Much of what is depicted in the film is based on historical fact. As quoted in the HR review, biographer Bertita Harding, on whose book the film is based, wrote that Wagner (1813—1883) was “one of the most selfish, inconsiderate, ruthless and altogether impossible people who ever lived.” His marriages to Minna Planer and Cosima von Buelow; his affair with Mathilde Wesendonk; and his relationships with Bavarian King Louis (Ludwig) II, Franz Liszt and Giacomo Meyerbeer are well-documented. His historically documented conceit, debts, ... More Less

The following statement appears after the opening credits: "This picture was produced at actual historical locations by the Republic Studio Organization." After the opening credits, a scrolling introduction reads as follows: "In the middle of the Nineteenth Century when the social structure of Europe was about to be reshaped, the world of music was shaken by one man Richard Wagner." The introduction then states that Wagner was born in Leipzig, Germany in 1813, the ninth child of a poor family, and that, in 1834, the Magdeburg Stage and Opera Company needed a conductor. Voice-over narration by Alan Badel as "Richard Wagner" is heard intermittently throughout the film. Cities depicted in the film are introduced with eighteenth-century drawings. Although copyright records list the film's length as 112 minutes, the print viewed was approximately 94-95 minutes, which corresponds to the running time listed in reviews. Although the MPA incorrectly reports the release date as 29 Mar 1956 and a 5 May 1956 MPHPD noted that the film was a May release, an Apr 1956 HR news item stated that it opened nationally on 27 Apr 1956.
       Much of what is depicted in the film is based on historical fact. As quoted in the HR review, biographer Bertita Harding, on whose book the film is based, wrote that Wagner (1813—1883) was “one of the most selfish, inconsiderate, ruthless and altogether impossible people who ever lived.” His marriages to Minna Planer and Cosima von Buelow; his affair with Mathilde Wesendonk; and his relationships with Bavarian King Louis (Ludwig) II, Franz Liszt and Giacomo Meyerbeer are well-documented. His historically documented conceit, debts, betrayals, political involvements and efforts to create a festival and opera house to showcase his works have become legendary in the history of music.
       In the presentation of the life of the composer, many events of Wagner’s life have been omitted from the film. For example, the film only dwells on his operatic works, although he also wrote many other vocal and instrumental pieces. More related to the theme of the film are numerous adulterous affairs Wagner had that were not mentioned in the story and his three children by Cosima, one of whom Hans von Buelow claimed as his own to prevent scandal. Also avoided were Wagner’s later-life theories about “racial purity” and the posthumous endorsement of his music by Adolph Hitler. The latter has discouraged many modern musicians and audience members from performing and listening to his work, despite the numerous contributions he made to the development of traditional Western music. Regarding the recreation of Wagner’s life on film, the LAT review recognized that “any further delving into the reality of the composer’s life might have made him unsympathetic,” and the review applauded the filmmakers for taking the “best course in dealing with the life of a man which was as utterly strange as his accomplishments were endlessly triumphant.”
       According to HR production charts, the film was shot in widescreen in Munich. Oct and Nov 1954 HR news items specify Weisbaden, Bayreuth, Schweitengen and the Bavaria Film Studios in Geiselgasteig as shooting locations, and a Nov HR news item added that thirty-two locations within Germany were used for filming. According to a Jul 1954 LAT news item, producer-director William Dieterle went with Harding to Bayreuth, where the Wagner festival was held, to augment the screen story based on her book. Although an Aug 1954 HR news item announced that Rhonda Fleming was cast in the film, she was later replaced by Valentina Cortese. Magic Fire marked the American film debut of actor Erik Schumann who was billed onscreen as Eric Schumann.
       Magic Fire marked the final film of composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897—1957), who adapted Wagner’s music for the film. Nominated four times for an Academy Award for Best Original Score, he received two: one for the 1936 Warner Bros. production Anthony Adverse , which was directed by Mervin LeRoy and starred Fredric March, and the second for the 1938 Warner Bros. The Adventures of Robin Hood , directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Errol Flynn (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). Korngold’s style has been described by music scholars as “particularly” Wagnerian and he was one of the principal composers in the 1930s to develop film music.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 May 1956.
---
Daily Variety
27 Apr 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Mar 56
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1954.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1954
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1954
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1954
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 1954
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1956
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1956
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
3 Jul 1954.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Oct 1956.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 May 56
p. 882.
Variety
9 May 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A William Dieterle Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Opera scenes staged by
Munich
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Supv ed
MUSIC
Soloists, orchestra, choir from the
DANCE
Choreog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Magic Fire
Scenes Around Richard Wagner by Bertita Harding (Indianapolis, 1953).
MUSIC
Excerpt from Parsifal by Richard Wagner
The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Les Huguenots by Giacomo Meyerbeer.
SONGS
Excerpts from Siegfried , Götterdämmerung , Die Walküre , Rienzi , The Flying Dutchman , Lohengrin , Tristan und Isolde , Tannhäuser , Die Meistersinger and Das Rheingold by Richard Wagner.
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 April 1956
Premiere Information:
World premiere in London, England: 19 April 1956
Chicago opening: 26 April 1956
Production Date:
early October--late November 1954 at Bavaria Film Studios, Geiselgasteig, Germany
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 July 1955
Copyright Number:
LP6227
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor by Consolidated
Widescreen/ratio
1.66:1
Duration(in mins):
94-95
Countries:
Germany, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17311
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1834, in Magdeburg, Germany, conceited opera conductor and composer Richard Wagner meets actress Minna Planer, who gives up her career to marry him. The luxury-seeking Richard takes conducting jobs to provide financial security, but his ambition is to write innovative operas that reflect a new world order. When no one in Germany will perform his work, the Wagners journey to Paris by ship, which is the only mode of travel that will accommodate Richard's beloved dog. On board, Richard conceives of a new opera, The Flying Dutchman . In Paris, hoping to connect with influential people, Richard meets with German composer Giacomo Meyerbeer. At Meyerbeer’s home, surrounded by his students and admirers, Meyerbeer listens to Richard’s idea of a “music drama” without traditional ballets, arias and duets to interfere with dramatic action. Although many there scoff at Richard's concept of writing his own librettos and composing musical themes for each character, Meyerbeer asks Franz Liszt, a virtuoso pianist, to play the music Richard has brought. Although impressed by the richness of the music, Meyerbeer states he is too busy to take up Richard’s cause and warns that Richard is at a disadvantage because he has no recognizable “name” in fashion-conscious Paris. Later, Franz, who is also a composer, tells Richard that Meyerbeer is not opposed to his ideas, but that Paris is a city flooded with competing talent. In reply, Richard vows to have Paris “in my pocket” in a year’s time. Instead, the following year, Richard is serving time in debtors’ prison, while awaiting a response ... +


In 1834, in Magdeburg, Germany, conceited opera conductor and composer Richard Wagner meets actress Minna Planer, who gives up her career to marry him. The luxury-seeking Richard takes conducting jobs to provide financial security, but his ambition is to write innovative operas that reflect a new world order. When no one in Germany will perform his work, the Wagners journey to Paris by ship, which is the only mode of travel that will accommodate Richard's beloved dog. On board, Richard conceives of a new opera, The Flying Dutchman . In Paris, hoping to connect with influential people, Richard meets with German composer Giacomo Meyerbeer. At Meyerbeer’s home, surrounded by his students and admirers, Meyerbeer listens to Richard’s idea of a “music drama” without traditional ballets, arias and duets to interfere with dramatic action. Although many there scoff at Richard's concept of writing his own librettos and composing musical themes for each character, Meyerbeer asks Franz Liszt, a virtuoso pianist, to play the music Richard has brought. Although impressed by the richness of the music, Meyerbeer states he is too busy to take up Richard’s cause and warns that Richard is at a disadvantage because he has no recognizable “name” in fashion-conscious Paris. Later, Franz, who is also a composer, tells Richard that Meyerbeer is not opposed to his ideas, but that Paris is a city flooded with competing talent. In reply, Richard vows to have Paris “in my pocket” in a year’s time. Instead, the following year, Richard is serving time in debtors’ prison, while awaiting a response from German theaters to which he sent his completed “Dutchman.” He is almost resigned to composing music in prison solitude, when Minna tells him that the Dresden Court Theatre has agreed to perform his work, which gives him the cash to pay his debts and be released. After its first performance, the King of Saxonia appoints Richard to conduct his Royal Opera Company. Although he has good relations with the king, Richard makes enemies with Minister von Moll, when he tries to “reform” the company. The Wagner home becomes the site of political discussions by revolutionaries August Roeckel and Michael Bakunin, who distribute a handbill demanding a constitutional government, free press and free elections. When the king brings in Prussian soldiers to arrest the dissenters, Richard barely escapes by fleeing the city. Henceforth, Richard and his music are banned. Leaving Minna behind, Richard goes to Franz for help and meets his daughter Cosima, one of Richard’s most knowledgeable fans. After helping Richard escape to Zurich, Franz recommends him to wealthy businessman Otto Wesendonk, whose wife Mathilde’s professional admiration soon turns amorous. In a cottage on the Wesendonk estate, where Minna joins him, Richard begins a new opera, Tristan und Isolde . After Napoleon orders a command performance of his Tannhäuser , Richard goes to Paris, where he is convinced, by the whim of the emperor, to add a ballet to the opera. When Richard insists on placing the ballet in the first act, Franz explains that fashionable Parisians dine late and will not arrive until the second act, in which they expect to see the ballet. On opening night, as Franz feared, spoiled and arrogant members of the exclusive, late-arriving Jockey Club shout for the dancers, disrupting the performance. After three nights of their disruption, rather than move the ballet, Richard cancels the show. Back in Zurich, Richard presents a copy of his completed Tristan und Isolde to Otto, who gives him ten thousand francs to continue composing. After intercepting a love letter between Richard and Mathilde, Minna shows it to Otto, and then returns to Germany, where she later dies without ever reconciling with her husband. Asked to leave the estate by Otto, Richard proceeds to Venice to wait for Mathilde, whom he calls his “Isolde,” and becomes despondent and deeper in debt. Cosima, who has married Richard’s friend, musician Hans von Buelow, convinces Richard not to destroy himself over Mathilde, who will never sacrifice her security for him. Still exiled from Germany, Richard wanders for many years, until he is granted amnesty. Upon returning to Germany, Richard again escapes from his debts, when eighteen-year-old King Ludwig II of Bavaria, an ardent lover of Richard’s operas, offers patronage. Eager to support Richard luxuriously, Ludwig finances Richard’s extravagant lifestyle and joins in his dream of building an opera house scaled to the grandness of Wagnerian operas. When Richard hires Hans as conductor, the von Buelows join him, but Cosima, who recognizes the danger of being consumed by the “magic” of Richard’s “fire,” tries to protect the reverently loyal Hans from becoming his slave. After the opening of Richard’s next opera, Franz acknowledges that Richard is a “devil, but a genius.” Seeing Richard’s opulent lifestyle, Roeckel suggests that he has betrayed his dreams of a new world, but Richard replies, “I have created my new world in my operas.” Von Moll, now an official in the Bavarian government, is appalled by Richard’s arrogance and profligacy, and rallies the Bavarian State Council to demand Richard’s dismissal or Ludwig’s abdication. With regret, Ludwig accepts Richard’s forced resignation, hoping that he will return when the political climate changes. Cosima decides to leave Hans and accompany Richard to Switzerland. Despite public censure, they are living contentedly, when Franz, who is now a priest, visits them. Cosima concedes to her disapproving father that Richard is extravagant, egotistical and betrays his friends, but she believes in what he has given the world. She then divorces Hans and marries Richard. After war breaks out, Richard is compelled to return to Germany. In Bayreuth, with Ludwig’s assistance, he develops a music festival and builds an opera house, where his largest work, The Ring of the Nibelung , has its premiere. Because of Richard’s ill health, he and Cosima move to Venice, where he works on Parsifal , which contains religious themes. When religious groups, concerned about how Richard will treat sacred matters, send Franz to intervene, Richard explains that Parsifal expresses what he has learned from life: suffering, sacrifice and renunciation. Soon after, Richard dies.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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