Run for the Sun (1956)

98-99 mins | Adventure | August 1956

Director:

Roy Boulting

Producer:

Harry Tatelman

Cinematographer:

Joseph La Shelle

Production Designer:

Alfred Ybarra

Production Company:

Russ-Field Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Run for the Sun was one of four films produced for United Artists release by a company owned by actress Jane Russell and her then-husband, Robert Waterfield. Pre-production HR news items of Mar and Jun 1955 reported that the screenplay was being written by Robert Wilder, but he is not credited on the released film.
       According to publicity materials, the jungle sequences were shot about fifty miles from Acapulco, Mexico. The location used for "Browne" and "Van Anders'" base was a vast, ruined, 16th century hacienda and sugar plantation/refinery built by Hernán Cortes at Atlacomulco, southeast of Cuernavaca. In the 1980s the principal house and several other buildings were restored and turned into a hotel. For Run for the Sun , the interior and patio of the house, as well as the interior of the small hotel where "Katy Connors" and "Mike Latimer" meet, were built at Estudios Churubusco in Mexico City. The house interior was reputed to be the largest set yet built in a Mexican studio.
       Richard Edward Connell's short story served as the basis for several films including, most notably, the 1932 RKO Radio Pictures production The Most Dangerous Game , directed by Ernest B. Schoedsack and Irving Pichel and starring Joel McCrea and Fay Wray (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films , 1931-40 ) and the 1945 RKO film A Game of Death , directed by Robert Wise and starring John Loder and Audrey Long (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ... More Less

Run for the Sun was one of four films produced for United Artists release by a company owned by actress Jane Russell and her then-husband, Robert Waterfield. Pre-production HR news items of Mar and Jun 1955 reported that the screenplay was being written by Robert Wilder, but he is not credited on the released film.
       According to publicity materials, the jungle sequences were shot about fifty miles from Acapulco, Mexico. The location used for "Browne" and "Van Anders'" base was a vast, ruined, 16th century hacienda and sugar plantation/refinery built by Hernán Cortes at Atlacomulco, southeast of Cuernavaca. In the 1980s the principal house and several other buildings were restored and turned into a hotel. For Run for the Sun , the interior and patio of the house, as well as the interior of the small hotel where "Katy Connors" and "Mike Latimer" meet, were built at Estudios Churubusco in Mexico City. The house interior was reputed to be the largest set yet built in a Mexican studio.
       Richard Edward Connell's short story served as the basis for several films including, most notably, the 1932 RKO Radio Pictures production The Most Dangerous Game , directed by Ernest B. Schoedsack and Irving Pichel and starring Joel McCrea and Fay Wray (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films , 1931-40 ) and the 1945 RKO film A Game of Death , directed by Robert Wise and starring John Loder and Audrey Long (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Jul 1956.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jul 1956
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Jul 1956
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 1955
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1955
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 1955
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1956
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
28 Jul 1956
p. 1.
New York Times
25 Aug 1956
p. 7.
Variety
25 Jul 1956
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
Head elec
Head grip
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Auditor
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Edward Connell in Collier's (19 Jan 1924).
SONGS
"Taco" and "Triste ranchero," words by Nestor Amaral, music by Frederick Steiner.
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1956
Premiere Information:
World premiere in New Orleans, LA: 27 July 1956
Production Date:
began early November 1955 at Estudios Churubusco, Mexico City
addl shooting done on location in Mexico
Copyright Claimant:
Russ-Field Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1956
Copyright Number:
LP8120
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Color
Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
SuperScope 235
Lenses/Prints
Print by Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
98-99
Length(in reels):
11
Countries:
Mexico, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17985
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Katy Connors, a reporter for Sight magazine, travels to a remote fishing village in Mexico in search of the Hemingwayesque novelist and adventurer Mike Latimer, who has abandoned writing and chosen to disappear. Katy discovers that Mike is living in the small hotel she is staying at and tells him that she is waiting for friends to arrive on a yacht. Mike invites her to go marlin fishing with him and, over several days, they enjoy each other’s company, although Katy does not reveal the true reason for her presence there. Katy realizes that she may be falling in love with Mike and, when her editor phones from New York, tells him that she may not be the best person to write about Mike. One night, Mike explains that he fell apart after his wife had an affair with his best friend while they were all on safari in Africa and that he has been unable to write since then. Confused by her emotions, Katy decides to leave, but Mike refuses to let her journey to Acapulco in the village’s dangerous, old taxi and offers to fly her directly to Mexico City in his own small plane. During the flight, however, a magnetized notebook in Katy’s purse affects the compass readings and when Mike descends through the clouds expecting to see Mexico City below, they instead find themselves over a jungle. The plane runs out of fuel forcing Mike to crash-land near a clearing. Mike is knocked out by the impact and, when he wakes up, discovers he is in the main house of a ... +


Katy Connors, a reporter for Sight magazine, travels to a remote fishing village in Mexico in search of the Hemingwayesque novelist and adventurer Mike Latimer, who has abandoned writing and chosen to disappear. Katy discovers that Mike is living in the small hotel she is staying at and tells him that she is waiting for friends to arrive on a yacht. Mike invites her to go marlin fishing with him and, over several days, they enjoy each other’s company, although Katy does not reveal the true reason for her presence there. Katy realizes that she may be falling in love with Mike and, when her editor phones from New York, tells him that she may not be the best person to write about Mike. One night, Mike explains that he fell apart after his wife had an affair with his best friend while they were all on safari in Africa and that he has been unable to write since then. Confused by her emotions, Katy decides to leave, but Mike refuses to let her journey to Acapulco in the village’s dangerous, old taxi and offers to fly her directly to Mexico City in his own small plane. During the flight, however, a magnetized notebook in Katy’s purse affects the compass readings and when Mike descends through the clouds expecting to see Mexico City below, they instead find themselves over a jungle. The plane runs out of fuel forcing Mike to crash-land near a clearing. Mike is knocked out by the impact and, when he wakes up, discovers he is in the main house of a vast, ancient hacienda. Katy introduces him to the current residents, an Englishman named Browne and Dutch archaeologist Van Anders, who welcome him. Although Mike feels that he has met Browne before, he cannot remember where. Anders asks about the single rifle bullet Mike always carries with him and Mike explains that it is a souvenir of the time he covered the Normandy landings as a reporter. Mike and Katy are surprised to learn that Anders keeps a pack of savage dogs on the property to control the local Indians working on his dig. As there is no method of communicating with the outside world, Mike hopes to be able to repair his plane, but it has disappeared. Later, they all hear a commercial radio broadcast announcing that Mike’s flight is missing and that a reporter from Sight magazine was accompanying him. As Katy had not revealed her true occupation to him, Mike becomes very angry with her for invading his private life, although she declares that she had decided not to complete her assignment. That night, when all are asleep, Mike prowls around the large house and finds a storage area filled with hunting rifles. When Mike attempts to go outside the dogs start barking, wakening Browne and Anders, and Mike overhears them talking in German. The next morning, Mike tells Katy that they should work together to try to escape as he feels that Browne and Anders are not what they appear to be. During a walk, Mike and Katy discover that Browne and Anders have a small plane nearby, of which they had made no mention. Later, while listening to Browne speaking, Mike suddenly realizes that he had heard him before when he was in Britain during World War II and Browne, an infamous traitor, was broadcasting Nazi propaganda from Berlin to Britain. When Mike accuses Browne of being a Nazi, the Englishman admits who he is and adds that he was once married to Anders’ sister. Mike tries to bargain for Katy’s release but to no avail. That night, after Mike establishes that Anders is also a fugitive Nazi war criminal, Katy and he try to take over the plane, but are shot at by guard Jan, forcing them into the jungle. Alerted by the shots, Browne, Anders and the dogs join Jan in chasing after the couple. A friendly Indian gives Mike a machete, which he uses to hack their way through the jungle. After a long, exhausting chase, during which Jan is killed in a trap set by Mike, Katy and Mike double back toward the plane. Meanwhile, in his pocket, Mike has found an unread slip of paper on which Katy wrote her address at Sight magazine during the plane ride, and realizes that she had tried to tell him about herself. Mike and Katy reach the hacienda and barricade themselves in the chapel. After Browne and Anders discover them there, Anders leaves to bring some Indians to help break down the heavy door. Once Anders has gone, Browne calls to Mike through the door offering to kill Anders if Mike will help him escape to South America. In reply, Mike stuffs his lucky bullet into a small hole in the door and detonates it by hitting it with a rock. The bullet then enters Browne’s stomach, killing him. As Mike and Katy run to the plane, Anders returns but is killed when he is hit by the plane as it takes off, carrying Mike and Katy back to civilization.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.