Yaqui Drums (1956)

71 mins | Western | 14 October 1956

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HISTORY

According to a 31 Jul 1956 HR news item, the film was "to be printed in sepia tone," but reviews do not mention sepia tone and the viewed print was black and ... More Less

According to a 31 Jul 1956 HR news item, the film was "to be printed in sepia tone," but reviews do not mention sepia tone and the viewed print was black and white. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Mar 1957.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jan 57
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1956
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1956
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 1956
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Nov 56
p. 130.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A William F. Broidy & Co. Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Set cont
Prod asst
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 October 1956
Production Date:
early April--mid April 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
3 October 1956
Copyright Number:
LP7124
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,352
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18111
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As Mexican-Indian bandit Yaqui Jack and his two cohorts hold up a stagecoach carrying land baron Matt Quigg, his son Lute and saloon singer Linda, Quigg’s right-hand man Lefty ambushes the bandits. After being shot, Jack escapes and is found by Webb Dunham, who tends to his wound and feeds the stranger. Jack is shocked by the white man’s kindness and explains that he has come to America to get money to fund his army in Mexico. When Webb explains that he is taking over his murdered brother’s property, Candelabra Ranch, Jack warns him that there is trouble in area and promises to repay Webb’s favor. On his way to the ranch, Webb meets a fellow rancher, who explains that Quigg claims that most area ranch land deeds are invalid because of an old Spanish grant that gives Quigg title. The man continues that after Quigg gave the ranchers only ninety days notice to vacate, they agreed to leave to protect their families from Quigg’s brutal tactics. Finding Quigg, Lute and Lefty at his ranch, Webb starts a fistfight with Lefty and vows not to forfeit land that is rightfully his. Quigg suggests that if Webb’s deed is valid, he will allow him to keep the land and then offers his hand. As Webb shakes it, the ruthless Quigg hits him over the head, orders his men to beat him senseless and gives Webb forty-eight hours to vacate. Later, after learning from a neighboring rancher that other men who confronted the nefarious Quigg met their deaths, Webb seeks the sheriff’s help. Although the sheriff asserts that the ranchers are all his friends, he explains that Quigg has bribed the ... +


As Mexican-Indian bandit Yaqui Jack and his two cohorts hold up a stagecoach carrying land baron Matt Quigg, his son Lute and saloon singer Linda, Quigg’s right-hand man Lefty ambushes the bandits. After being shot, Jack escapes and is found by Webb Dunham, who tends to his wound and feeds the stranger. Jack is shocked by the white man’s kindness and explains that he has come to America to get money to fund his army in Mexico. When Webb explains that he is taking over his murdered brother’s property, Candelabra Ranch, Jack warns him that there is trouble in area and promises to repay Webb’s favor. On his way to the ranch, Webb meets a fellow rancher, who explains that Quigg claims that most area ranch land deeds are invalid because of an old Spanish grant that gives Quigg title. The man continues that after Quigg gave the ranchers only ninety days notice to vacate, they agreed to leave to protect their families from Quigg’s brutal tactics. Finding Quigg, Lute and Lefty at his ranch, Webb starts a fistfight with Lefty and vows not to forfeit land that is rightfully his. Quigg suggests that if Webb’s deed is valid, he will allow him to keep the land and then offers his hand. As Webb shakes it, the ruthless Quigg hits him over the head, orders his men to beat him senseless and gives Webb forty-eight hours to vacate. Later, after learning from a neighboring rancher that other men who confronted the nefarious Quigg met their deaths, Webb seeks the sheriff’s help. Although the sheriff asserts that the ranchers are all his friends, he explains that Quigg has bribed the officials, leaving the sheriff with no options. Meanwhile, Lute proposes to Linda, but she coldly suggests that he must ask his father for permission. Later at Quigg’s Silver Dollar Saloon, Webb walks in just as Linda, his ex-lover, finishes a sultry number. When Linda asks him to buy her a beer, Webb reluctantly complies, but Lute orders the rancher to leave. In response, Webb punches both Lute and his father and tells them they can finish the fight at his hotel room. Later, Linda goes to Webb’s room to warn him about Quigg. Webb, still bitter about their breakup, dismisses Linda’s concern. In her defense, she explains that when Webb was unwilling to settle down with her, she made plans to marry Lute for security. The next day Webb returns to his ranch to find Jack. In an attempt to make good on his promise, Jack has knocked out Lefty, who had been waiting to kill Webb. After Webb orders Lefty to return to Quigg with a warning, Jack confides in Webb that he is planning an insurrection in Mexico against rich landowners and asks Webb to show him how to operate a Gatling gun he has procured. Later, after Yaquis rob another stagecoach, resulting in more losses to Quigg’s holdings, Lute suggests to the sheriff that he has proof Webb is harboring the fugitives. As Quigg, Lute, Linda and the sheriff make their way to the ranch, Yaquis attack their carriage. Before Webb can stop the fight, Jack knocks him out. Webb wakes up in a Mexican hacienda, which Jack and his men have taken over for the insurrection’s headquarters. Jack explains that although Webb is free to go, he is holding Quigg, Lute, Linda, Lefty and the sheriff for $50,000 ransom and Quigg’s promise to return the Dunham ranch to Webb. Sensing Webb is still in love with Linda, Jack suggests that if Webb shows him how to use the Gatling gun, he will free her. Later, when Webb accuses Quigg of his brother’s murder, an arrogant Quigg blames Yaquis, however, Lefty admits that under Quigg’s orders, he killed him. Webb then chokes Quigg, prompting Jack to knock his friend out to keep Webb from killing the land baron. Jack then gives Quigg until midnight to agree to the ransom demand. As Webb shows his friend how to use the Gatling, Linda refuses Lefty’s proposal that they escape together and he attacks her. Hearing Linda’s screams, Webb races to her rescue. Lefty is accidentally shot when he pulls out a gun in the ensuing struggle with Webb. Webb then offers to take Linda with him, but she admits she has married Lute. At midnight, Quigg agrees to the demands after which Jack gives Lute twenty-four hours to return with the money to save his father’s life. Suddenly, Yaqui drums sound, warning of a Mexican Army attack. Meanwhile, in a moment alone with Linda, Lute secretly confides that he will not return with the money, suggesting that once his father is dead, the inheritance will be theirs. Quigg, having overheard the betrayal, rushes into the room and hits his son, who instantly dies when his head hits the fireplace in the fall. Webb feels only pity for the now-bereft Quigg and suggests to Linda that, as Lute’s widow, she will now have the security she desired. However, Linda protests that she loves only Webb and admits she was mistaken for not trusting him before. As they are about to leave the hacienda, the Mexican Army attacks the Yaquis. Realizing that the Yaquis are hopelessly unprepared and outnumbered, Webb holds Jack at gunpoint and orders him to call off his men. After Jack surrenders, a Mexican officer offers him a commission post, while suggesting that the rest of his men will be brought before a firing squad. Incensed, Jack attacks the officer and is mortally wounded in the fight. With Webb at his side, Jack explains that good generals do not give up their people and begs Webb to prevent the Yaquis from being punished for his own inept leadership. Soon after, Yaquis escort a carriage to the border carrying Linda and Webb to their new life together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.