The Badge of Marshal Brennan (1957)

74 or 76 mins | Western | 26 May 1957

Director:

Albert C. Gannaway

Writer:

Tom Hubbard

Producer:

Albert C. Gannaway

Cinematographer:

Charles Straumer

Editor:

Warren Adams

Production Designer:

Steve Gusson
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HISTORY

The cast order differs between the opening and closing credits. Thomas G. Hubbard's onscreen credit reads: "Written by Thomas G. Hubbard, Associate Producer." A HR news item of 19 Apr 1956 reported that producer-director Albert C. Gannaway intended to shoot The Badge of Marshal Brennan in Kanab, UT, in color and widescreen, but the film was released in black and white. A 31 May 1956 HR news item stated that Gannaway was building a three-stage studio, as well as two western streets, on a three-thousand acre property in Kanab and intended to shoot The Badge of Marshal Brennan and another Western, The Gun and the Gavel there. The latter film, eventually released by Republic as Raiders of Old California , was shot immediately after The Badge of Marshal Brennan and utilized many of the same cast and crew. Apparently the Kanab stages were not ready in time to accomodate the films as a 29 Jun 1956 HR news item indicated that Gannaway was shooting interiors for both films at the Cascade Studios in Hollywood.
       Other HR news items and production charts add Tom Black, Don Diamond and Ron McNeil to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Despite a 3 Dec 1956 HR story that singer Marty Robbins would "record several songs from the film," only the song sung by Harve Presnell over the opening and closing credits appeared in the released film. Although Presnell did not appear in the film, The Badge of Marshal Brennan marked his first credit ... More Less

The cast order differs between the opening and closing credits. Thomas G. Hubbard's onscreen credit reads: "Written by Thomas G. Hubbard, Associate Producer." A HR news item of 19 Apr 1956 reported that producer-director Albert C. Gannaway intended to shoot The Badge of Marshal Brennan in Kanab, UT, in color and widescreen, but the film was released in black and white. A 31 May 1956 HR news item stated that Gannaway was building a three-stage studio, as well as two western streets, on a three-thousand acre property in Kanab and intended to shoot The Badge of Marshal Brennan and another Western, The Gun and the Gavel there. The latter film, eventually released by Republic as Raiders of Old California , was shot immediately after The Badge of Marshal Brennan and utilized many of the same cast and crew. Apparently the Kanab stages were not ready in time to accomodate the films as a 29 Jun 1956 HR news item indicated that Gannaway was shooting interiors for both films at the Cascade Studios in Hollywood.
       Other HR news items and production charts add Tom Black, Don Diamond and Ron McNeil to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Despite a 3 Dec 1956 HR story that singer Marty Robbins would "record several songs from the film," only the song sung by Harve Presnell over the opening and closing credits appeared in the released film. Although Presnell did not appear in the film, The Badge of Marshal Brennan marked his first credit on a feature film. His first onscreen appearance was in the 1964 M-G-M release The Unsinkable Molly Brown (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ). Carl Smith, who played "Sheriff Carl Smith," was also a popular western singer. The film's music score was played exclusively on guitars. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Aug 1957.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Aug 1957
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 1956
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 1956
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1956
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1956
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 1956
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Jun 1957
p. 419.
Variety
14 Aug 1957
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Albert C. Gannaway Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Head grip
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Music comp and played by
On The Fender Guitars
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Asst to prod
Prod asst
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Man on the Run," music by Albert Gannaway and Ramez Idriss, lyrics by Hal Levy, sung by Harve Presnell.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 May 1957
Production Date:
early June 1956 in Utah and at Cascade Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 June 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8339
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System; Glen Glenn Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
74 or 76
Length(in feet):
6,826
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18342
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When a gunman, on the run from the law, comes upon a dying U.S. marshal, Matt Brennan, he takes his badge and adopts his identity. In the nearby town of Banock, Dr. Steve Hale fears that he is facing an outbreak of an epidemic when an Indian’s son dies under mysterious circumstances. The town derives most of its meat and dairy products from the herds owned by cattle baron Col. Doniphan and his son Shad, and Steve suspects that their cattle are possible carriers of a disease. With Sheriff Carl Smith’s help, Steve takes a blood sample from one of Doniphan’s calves and his lab work confirms that the animal is infected with black spot fever. Steve asks Carl if he can arrange for him to examine the entire herd, but that exceeds Carl’s authority and requires an order from a federal marshal. Meanwhile, Doniphan shows Shad several dead cattle and, fearing that his entire herd will be ordered destroyed, tells him to begin a roundup to remove all the cattle from the ranch. The colonel also orders Shad to help Chicamon, the Indian who blames Steve for the death of his child and intends to kill him. Shad organizes a lynching and is about to hang Steve when “Brennan,” who is riding by, stops the hanging at gunpoint, arrests Shad and delivers him to the jail in Banock. As Doniphan puts up bail for Shad, several of his gunmen rough up Steve, who is rescued by Carl and Brennan. After more townspeople fall ill, Carl, Steve and Murdock, the female owner of a small café, plead with Brennan to stay and declare an official emergency, but Brennan does ... +


When a gunman, on the run from the law, comes upon a dying U.S. marshal, Matt Brennan, he takes his badge and adopts his identity. In the nearby town of Banock, Dr. Steve Hale fears that he is facing an outbreak of an epidemic when an Indian’s son dies under mysterious circumstances. The town derives most of its meat and dairy products from the herds owned by cattle baron Col. Doniphan and his son Shad, and Steve suspects that their cattle are possible carriers of a disease. With Sheriff Carl Smith’s help, Steve takes a blood sample from one of Doniphan’s calves and his lab work confirms that the animal is infected with black spot fever. Steve asks Carl if he can arrange for him to examine the entire herd, but that exceeds Carl’s authority and requires an order from a federal marshal. Meanwhile, Doniphan shows Shad several dead cattle and, fearing that his entire herd will be ordered destroyed, tells him to begin a roundup to remove all the cattle from the ranch. The colonel also orders Shad to help Chicamon, the Indian who blames Steve for the death of his child and intends to kill him. Shad organizes a lynching and is about to hang Steve when “Brennan,” who is riding by, stops the hanging at gunpoint, arrests Shad and delivers him to the jail in Banock. As Doniphan puts up bail for Shad, several of his gunmen rough up Steve, who is rescued by Carl and Brennan. After more townspeople fall ill, Carl, Steve and Murdock, the female owner of a small café, plead with Brennan to stay and declare an official emergency, but Brennan does not want to get involved, saying that he intends to move on. When Carl receives a “wanted” poster for a Jeff Harlan, whom he recognizes as Brennan, he says nothing. Eventually, Brennan decides to stay and agrees to help Steve to take more blood from the sick cattle, which have not yet been rounded up, in an attempt to create an antidote. Meanwhile, Doniphan uses his considerable political influence to summon the governor to his ranch to prevent the slaughter of his herds. As more people fall ill and die, Murdock converts her café into a hospital. Although she is falling in love with Brennan, he is unwilling to make any commitment. During Doniphan’s roundup, Felipé, one of his ranchhands, collapses with the fever and Shad shoots him. Steve, Brennan and Carl find Felipé and, before he dies, he tells them that the governor is arriving to see Doniphan, who still intends to drive the diseased cattle elsewhere. Brennan wants no further involvement in the town’s problems and again attempts to leave, but is persuaded by Carl to stay a little longer to help him intercept the governor and plead for his help. While they wait for the governor, Carl shows Brennan the “wanted for murder” poster and Brennan tells him that the murder was a fair fight, but he never was given a chance to prove it. After Carl stops the governor and explains the situation, the governor authorizes him to halt the cattle drive. When Carl returns to Banock, he discovers that Steve’s antidote is working, prompting many of the grateful townspeople to volunteer to help Carl stop the drive. Brennan has not returned with Carl, so Murdock tracks him down and, after telling him that Carl has told her of his past, convinces him that they can start a new life together. The next morning, Brennan joins Carl, Steve and the townsmen in a gunfight as the Doniphans attempt to drive the herd across a river. After Brennan shoots the colonel and beats up Shad, the ranchhands turn back with the cattle. Brennan then decides to settle down with Murdock in Banock. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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