Copper Sky (1957)

76-77 mins | Western | September 1957

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HISTORY

According to a May 1957 HR news item, the original title of this film was The Far West . The onscreen credit for Nathan R. Barragar reads "production manager and assistant director." A Jun 1957 HR news item adds that the film was shot partially on location in Kanab, ... More Less

According to a May 1957 HR news item, the original title of this film was The Far West . The onscreen credit for Nathan R. Barragar reads "production manager and assistant director." A Jun 1957 HR news item adds that the film was shot partially on location in Kanab, UT. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Sep 1957.
---
Daily Variety
16 Sep 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Sep 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Sep 57
p. 539.
Variety
18 Sep 57
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Emirau Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
SET DECORATORS
Property master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
Sd facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Opt eff
Opt eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
STAND INS
Stunts
SOURCES
SONGS
"Copper Sky," music and lyrics by Raoul Kraushaar, Joe Hoover and Marilyn Hoover.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Far West
Release Date:
September 1957
Production Date:
began 4 June 1957 at California Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 September 1957
Copyright Number:
LP9310
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
RegalScope
Duration(in mins):
76-77
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Upon riding into the small town of Occidental, Hack Williams, an ex-cavalryman, dismounts his horse near the stables. From the shadows, an Indian shoots another Indian seated peacefully by the side of the barn. Startled, Hack fires his rifle, sending the assassin scurrying away. Drawn by the sound of gunfire, the townsfolk assemble by the barn and accuse Hack of murdering the peaceful Indian. Fearful that the Indian's death will incite the tribe to attack, the town finds Hack guilty of murder and sentences him to hang. While awaiting his execution, Hack convinces his jailer to provide him with a bottle of whiskey. The next morning, the tribe appears and annihilates the entire town. Only Hack, drunk in his cell, is spared. Soon after, Nora Hayes, a proper Boston schoolteacher, arrives in town in a wagon driven by Charlie Martin, and the two are shocked to find the street littered with dead bodies. After Charlie is shot and killed by a wounded Indian, Nora presumes that she is alone until Hack, drunk and cackling, stumbles around the corner. When Nora asks Hack to escort her back to the stagecoach station, he warns her that the Indians will be waiting in ambush and offers to accompany her to a nearby settlement instead. Climbing back into Charlie's wagon, the two leave town and Hack continues his drinking spree. Hack's drunkenness and insolence offend the proper Nora, who questions why he left the cavalry. After the drunken Hack explains that he resigned because he hated killing, the pair camp for the night. Cold and frightened, Nora snuggles next to Hack for warmth ... +


Upon riding into the small town of Occidental, Hack Williams, an ex-cavalryman, dismounts his horse near the stables. From the shadows, an Indian shoots another Indian seated peacefully by the side of the barn. Startled, Hack fires his rifle, sending the assassin scurrying away. Drawn by the sound of gunfire, the townsfolk assemble by the barn and accuse Hack of murdering the peaceful Indian. Fearful that the Indian's death will incite the tribe to attack, the town finds Hack guilty of murder and sentences him to hang. While awaiting his execution, Hack convinces his jailer to provide him with a bottle of whiskey. The next morning, the tribe appears and annihilates the entire town. Only Hack, drunk in his cell, is spared. Soon after, Nora Hayes, a proper Boston schoolteacher, arrives in town in a wagon driven by Charlie Martin, and the two are shocked to find the street littered with dead bodies. After Charlie is shot and killed by a wounded Indian, Nora presumes that she is alone until Hack, drunk and cackling, stumbles around the corner. When Nora asks Hack to escort her back to the stagecoach station, he warns her that the Indians will be waiting in ambush and offers to accompany her to a nearby settlement instead. Climbing back into Charlie's wagon, the two leave town and Hack continues his drinking spree. Hack's drunkenness and insolence offend the proper Nora, who questions why he left the cavalry. After the drunken Hack explains that he resigned because he hated killing, the pair camp for the night. Cold and frightened, Nora snuggles next to Hack for warmth and safety. The next morning, as they continue their journey, Nora pours out Hack's liquor supply. Upon reaching the settlement, the two are stunned to find that the entire town has been massacred. As Nora chastises Hack and compares him to her depraved father, Hack swerves around and shoots an Indian who is about to kill them. Shaken by the experience, Nora apologizes for her harsh words. Misfortune follows them as one of the horses goes lame and a wagon wheel fails. Forced to cross the desert on foot, their water supply depleted, the two suffer from thirst and exhaustion. Desperate, Hack suggests they pray and asks Nora to teach him how. After bowing their heads, they miraculously discover a pond nearby. Joyously immersing themselves in the water, the two embrace and emerge refreshed. They are about to continue their trek when Hack spots a lone rider in the distance. The man, a wounded trooper named Hadley, recognizes Hack from his cavalry days. With his dying breath, Hadley recounts that he was shot by Indians while on a scouting mission and begs Hack to warn the oncoming patrol that the warriors are waiting in ambush. Mounting Hadley's horse, Hack rides into the ambush, drawing gunfire. Alerted by the sound of gunshots, the troopers raise their pistols in defense, thus thwarting the attack. Wounded, Hack is taken to a doctor and recovers with Nora at his side. After Hack and Nora embrace and call each other by their Christian names for the first time, Col. Thurston enters the room and thanks Hack for his heroism, thus redeeming his career as a soldier. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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