Gun Glory (1957)

88-89 mins | Western | August 1957

Director:

Roy Rowland

Writer:

William Ludwig

Producer:

Nicholas Nayfack

Cinematographer:

Harold J. Marzorati

Editor:

Frank Santillo

Production Designers:

William A. Horning, Merrill Pye

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a 2 Nov 1956 HR news item, Bob Brandies was considered for a part in the film; however, he was later replaced. Gun Glory marked the first time Roy Rowland directed his son, Steve Rowland, in a motion picture. The film also marked the first time British actor Stewart Granger appeared in a Western. Nov and Dec 1956 HR news items note that portions of the film were shot on location at Bronson Canyon, in Los Angeles and in northern California, with headquarters in Garberville, ... More Less

According to a 2 Nov 1956 HR news item, Bob Brandies was considered for a part in the film; however, he was later replaced. Gun Glory marked the first time Roy Rowland directed his son, Steve Rowland, in a motion picture. The film also marked the first time British actor Stewart Granger appeared in a Western. Nov and Dec 1956 HR news items note that portions of the film were shot on location at Bronson Canyon, in Los Angeles and in northern California, with headquarters in Garberville, CA. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Jul 1957.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jul 1957
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Aug 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 1956
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 1956
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1956
p. 2, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1956
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 1957
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1957
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1957.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Jul 1957
p. 465.
New York Times
20 Jul 1957
p. 8.
Variety
24 Jul 1957
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Man of the West by Philip Yordan (New York, 1955).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Ninety and Nine," words by Elizabeth C. Clephane, music by Ira David Sankey, sung by Burl Ives.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 July 1957
Production Date:
early November 1956--mid January 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 May 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8355
Physical Properties:
Sound
Perspecta Sound; Westrex Recording System
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
88-89
Length(in feet):
7,980
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18450
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the 1880s Wyoming frontier, infamous gambler and gunslinger Tom Early returns to the town in which he left his wife and young boy years before. After Early enters the general store, owner Sam Wainscott, a handicapped man, overcharges him, then jealously berates his clerk Jo for flirting with the known criminal. When Early reaches the family ranch, his 17-year-old son Tom, Jr. shows him his mother’s grave and blames him for her death. Early tries to explain that his villainous reputation is unwarranted and that his intentions was to win a fortune for his wife, but the hostile boy refuses to forgive Early for leaving them. The next morning, when Early comes to the store and asks Jo to help him find a housekeeper, Wainscott insinuates that she would consider taking the job in order to have an affair with the criminal. Just then, three strangers tell a gathering crowd that they plan to drive 20,000 cattle through the town’s valley on the way to market. Early recognizes ruthless businessman Grimsell among the men and protests that the farmers, as landowners, have the right to refuse access to their valley, but Grimsell claims an Indian treaty has granted him the right to drive his herd through the valley. Despite Grimsell’s orders to avoid violence, his cohort Blondie recognizes Early and challenges him to draw. Early tries to refuse the challenge, but Blondie is insistent, forcing Early to kill him. Back in the store, Wainscott taunts Jo, asking her if she prefers a murderer to a “crippled man.” Later that night, Jo, frustrated by Wainscott’s tirades, rides to the ranch to accept the housekeeping job. When Tom refuses ... +


On the 1880s Wyoming frontier, infamous gambler and gunslinger Tom Early returns to the town in which he left his wife and young boy years before. After Early enters the general store, owner Sam Wainscott, a handicapped man, overcharges him, then jealously berates his clerk Jo for flirting with the known criminal. When Early reaches the family ranch, his 17-year-old son Tom, Jr. shows him his mother’s grave and blames him for her death. Early tries to explain that his villainous reputation is unwarranted and that his intentions was to win a fortune for his wife, but the hostile boy refuses to forgive Early for leaving them. The next morning, when Early comes to the store and asks Jo to help him find a housekeeper, Wainscott insinuates that she would consider taking the job in order to have an affair with the criminal. Just then, three strangers tell a gathering crowd that they plan to drive 20,000 cattle through the town’s valley on the way to market. Early recognizes ruthless businessman Grimsell among the men and protests that the farmers, as landowners, have the right to refuse access to their valley, but Grimsell claims an Indian treaty has granted him the right to drive his herd through the valley. Despite Grimsell’s orders to avoid violence, his cohort Blondie recognizes Early and challenges him to draw. Early tries to refuse the challenge, but Blondie is insistent, forcing Early to kill him. Back in the store, Wainscott taunts Jo, asking her if she prefers a murderer to a “crippled man.” Later that night, Jo, frustrated by Wainscott’s tirades, rides to the ranch to accept the housekeeping job. When Tom refuses to believe that Early killed Blondie in self-defense, Jo, having witnessed the shooting, assures him that his father acted within the law. The next morning, Early, Jo and Tom ride to church, where the good-natured preacher, an old friend of Early’s, warmly greets them; however, when Wainscott rants about Early’s lawlessness, the congregation ostracizes them. Days later, after the preacher tells Early about a town meeting that has been called to discuss Grimsell, Early warns him that Grimsell will not settle the dispute legally. Jo, believing the preacher was at the ranch to accuse her of indecency, begs to know what they talked about. Early assures her that her behavior, far from being shameful, has made him happy to be at the ranch again. The next day, Grimsell offers to buy Early’s land at an inflated cost to use as a shortcut to the market, but Early refuses. That evening, when young Tom kisses Jo and then apologizes, Jo agrees not to tell Early, knowing the boy acted out of loneliness and confusion. At a town meeting, after it is decided to send townsman Martin to Laramie to obtain land ownership documents to dispute Grimsell’s right to drive the herd through their valley, Early warns that Grimsell will use the extra time to gather more gunmen. Later that night, Tom mistakenly assumes Early and Jo are laughing about his amorous attempt and slaps his father. When the temperamental boy refuses to apologize, Early saddles up his horse to leave. Assuming he is leaving for good, Jo rushes out to stop him, but Early assures her he will be back and kisses her. After discovering Martin’s dead body in the pass the next morning, Early finds Grimsell and suggests that he take the barren route through public land nearby. Grimsell, who wants to fatten the cattle on the town’s lush valley, announces that he now has 30 more gunmen to guarantee his safe passage. When Martin’s horse returns to the church without its rider, the preacher gathers a posse and rides out to the ranch to enlist Early in their fight against Grimsell. Finding only Tom, the preacher allows the eager but inexperienced boy to join them. When Early returns to town with Martin’s body, he learns that the posse has already left. Gathering red ribbon from the store, he rushes to the pass. The posse is soon cornered in a canyon, where Grimsell’s men ambush them. Early arrives to find Tom and the preacher among the wounded. Early bandages his son’s injuries then says his farewell to the dying preacher, who asks him to take care of young Tom. After leaving Tom at home with Jo, Early returns to the pass, where he plants dynamite along the cliffs, marking it with ribbon. When Grimsell and his men move the herd through the pass the next morning, Early shoots the dynamite causing it to ignite and send an avalanche of rocks to block the pass. The panicked herd stampede in retreat, killing many of Grimsell’s men. Grimsell and his henchman Gunn ride to Early’s ranch seeking revenge and take Tom and Jo hostage. As Early approaches the house, Grimsell and Gunn threaten to kill Tom unless Early drops his gun. Early concedes to the demand and walks towards them with his hands up, but then grabs Grimsell’s gun. Unarmed and desperate, Gunn then challenges Early to a fistfight. Tom uses Grimsell’s weapon to hold Grimsell at gunpoint, while Early and Gunn fight, but when Gunn reaches for Early’s gun on the ground, Tom shoots and kills him. After Early orders Grimsell off the property, Tom calls Early “Dad” and admits that violence is sometimes necessary. Heartened by the boy’s understanding and his triumph, Early kisses Jo and they promise each other to stay on the ranch. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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