The Restless Breed (1957)

81 or 85 mins | Western | May 1957

Director:

Allan Dwan

Writer:

Steve Fisher

Cinematographer:

John W. Boyle

Production Designer:

Ernst Fegté

Production Company:

National Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The film's title card reads: "Edward L. Alperson Presents A Legend of the Early West... The Restless Breed ." The order of the opening and closing cast credits differ considerably. At the end of the picture, the cast credits are introduced by the statement, "And These Were the Players of Legend." This is followed by medium shots of each of the actors, standing in a window frame as his or her name and role appear across the frame. Some actors listed in the closing credits are not included in the opening credits. The character names of Billy Miller and Marilyn Winston were not legible on the print viewed. Although HR production charts add Fred Graham, Steve Raines, Tom Steele, Dale Van Sickle , Harry Wood, Fern Hall, Tex Terry, Rocky Shahan and Carol Henry to the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been ... More Less

The film's title card reads: "Edward L. Alperson Presents A Legend of the Early West... The Restless Breed ." The order of the opening and closing cast credits differ considerably. At the end of the picture, the cast credits are introduced by the statement, "And These Were the Players of Legend." This is followed by medium shots of each of the actors, standing in a window frame as his or her name and role appear across the frame. Some actors listed in the closing credits are not included in the opening credits. The character names of Billy Miller and Marilyn Winston were not legible on the print viewed. Although HR production charts add Fred Graham, Steve Raines, Tom Steele, Dale Van Sickle , Harry Wood, Fern Hall, Tex Terry, Rocky Shahan and Carol Henry to the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 May 1957.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 May 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 56
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 56
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 May 57
p. 386.
Variety
15 May 57
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Edward L. Alperson Presentation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Prod exec
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Supv film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward des
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Restless Breed," "Never Alone" and "Angelita," lyrics by Dick Hughes and Richard Stadley, music by Edward L. Alperson, Jr.
DETAILS
Release Date:
May 1957
Production Date:
mid September--early October 1956
Copyright Claimant:
National Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 May 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8992
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathé Color
Duration(in mins):
81 or 85
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1865, just after the close of the Civil War, the U.S. Secret Service finds itself at war with Newton's Raiders, a band of cold-blooded killers smuggling guns to Emperor Maxmillian of Mexico. The outlaws operate just outside the U.S. border in Mexico, and when Ed Newton, their leader, kills Frank Baker, the Secret Service agent in charge of the case, Baker's lawyer son Mitch vows revenge. Despite the entreaties of the Secret Service chief to allow Marshal Steve Evans to bring Newton to justice, Mitch claims his father's gun and heads for the iniquitous border town of Mission, Texas to exact retribution. Upon arriving, Mitch visits Reverend Simmons, the self-proclaimed preacher who runs a mission for half-breed orphans and is the only man in town who was aware of Frank's objective. At the mission, Mitch watches Angelita, the reverend's sensuous ward, dance with lustful abandon. Concealing his identity, Mitch asks Simmons for a place to stay, and the reverend offers him the bed in which his father slept, and then warns him that the town is run by paid killers. Their conversation is interrupted by the sound of gunfire. Hurrying to its source, Mitch and Simmons witness the new sheriff being gunned down by Newton's thugs. When Simmons dares the murderer to come forth, Cherokee, Newton's henchman, ridicules the preacher. After pulling Simmons from harm's way, Mitch draws his gun and orders them to stop the killings. Heartened by Mitch's valor, the mayor offers him the dead sheriff's badge, but Mitch rejects it. Soon after, the sound of gunshots rings out through the streets once more, and Mitch returns ... +


In 1865, just after the close of the Civil War, the U.S. Secret Service finds itself at war with Newton's Raiders, a band of cold-blooded killers smuggling guns to Emperor Maxmillian of Mexico. The outlaws operate just outside the U.S. border in Mexico, and when Ed Newton, their leader, kills Frank Baker, the Secret Service agent in charge of the case, Baker's lawyer son Mitch vows revenge. Despite the entreaties of the Secret Service chief to allow Marshal Steve Evans to bring Newton to justice, Mitch claims his father's gun and heads for the iniquitous border town of Mission, Texas to exact retribution. Upon arriving, Mitch visits Reverend Simmons, the self-proclaimed preacher who runs a mission for half-breed orphans and is the only man in town who was aware of Frank's objective. At the mission, Mitch watches Angelita, the reverend's sensuous ward, dance with lustful abandon. Concealing his identity, Mitch asks Simmons for a place to stay, and the reverend offers him the bed in which his father slept, and then warns him that the town is run by paid killers. Their conversation is interrupted by the sound of gunfire. Hurrying to its source, Mitch and Simmons witness the new sheriff being gunned down by Newton's thugs. When Simmons dares the murderer to come forth, Cherokee, Newton's henchman, ridicules the preacher. After pulling Simmons from harm's way, Mitch draws his gun and orders them to stop the killings. Heartened by Mitch's valor, the mayor offers him the dead sheriff's badge, but Mitch rejects it. Soon after, the sound of gunshots rings out through the streets once more, and Mitch returns to the saloon to face down Cherokee and his men. When Mitch wounds Cherokee in the ensuing melee, the townsfolk think that the man they know only as "the young stranger" is a professional gunfighter. Enticed by Angelita, Mitch steals a kiss and calls her half-woman, half-angel, thus incurring Simmons' disapproval. During the Sunday service, Mitch sits outside the mission, cleaning his father's gun. After Mitch is injured in a skirmish with Cherokee, Angelita tenderly bandages his arm. To protect her reputation, Simmons asks Mitch to leave the mission. When Angelita breaks into tears at the thought of his departure, Mitch tries to comfort her and finally reveals his Christian name. Mitch moves into the dead sheriff's room at the hotel, and soon after, Marshal Evans rides into town. Evans, an old friend of Mitch's father, chastises him for taking the law into his own hands. Later, Evans tells Simmons about Mitch's true identity. Newton's spy, James Allan, a spineless sneak who has delusions of becoming a gunfighter, overhears their conversation and notifies Cherokee, who then rides across the border to summon Newton. That night, Evans reminds Mitch that his father wanted him to be a man of the law and not a man of the gun. The next day, as Newton rides toward town, Simmons pleads with Mitch to give up his quest for revenge. Defying propriety, Angelita visits Mitch in his hotel room, pledges her love and begs him to leave town before it is too late. As Newton and his men ride into town, Evans confronts them and arrests Newton for murder. In reply, Newton guns Evans down in cold blood. Before dying, Evans offers his badge to Mitch, who accepts it. After Newton disappears into the saloon, Mitch enters through the back door, brandishing his badge. As Newton is about to draw his gun, Mitch shoots and kills him, then drops his gun belt to embrace Angelita. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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