The Sun Also Rises (1957)

129 mins | Drama | September 1957

Writer:

Peter Viertel

Producer:

Darryl F. Zanuck

Cinematographer:

Leo Tover

Editor:

William Mace

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Mark-Lee Kirk

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's title card reads: "Darryl F. Zanuck's Production of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises ." The picture begins with the image of a sunrise over Paris. An offscreen narrator then recites a quotation from Ecclesiastes , "One generation passes away and another generation comes, but the earth abides forever...the sun also rises and the sun goes down and hastens to the place he arose." The picture ends in the same manner, except the narration concludes after the words "The sun also rises." After the opening credits are completed, the image changes to modern Paris and the narrator continues, "This is the Paris of today. Our story deals with another Paris, the Paris of 1922, shortly after what used to be called the Great War. We were part of that spectacular lost generation of young people who continued to live as though they were to die...we lived across the river on the Left Bank in the Bohemian world of poets, painters and writers."
       The filming of Hemingway's novel had a long gestation period. In Apr 1934, actress Ann Harding purchased the rights to the novel, intending to star as "Lady Brett Ashley," according to materials contained in the MPAA/PCA file on the film at the AMPAS Library. Leslie Howard was to play "Jake." In Dec 1944, Constance Bennett considered buying the rights from Harding, and planned to star in and produce the project for United Artists release, according to a Sep 1944 HR news item. According to a Mar 1949 LAT news item, Howard Hawks purchased the rights from Harding in 1949. At that time, ... More Less

The film's title card reads: "Darryl F. Zanuck's Production of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises ." The picture begins with the image of a sunrise over Paris. An offscreen narrator then recites a quotation from Ecclesiastes , "One generation passes away and another generation comes, but the earth abides forever...the sun also rises and the sun goes down and hastens to the place he arose." The picture ends in the same manner, except the narration concludes after the words "The sun also rises." After the opening credits are completed, the image changes to modern Paris and the narrator continues, "This is the Paris of today. Our story deals with another Paris, the Paris of 1922, shortly after what used to be called the Great War. We were part of that spectacular lost generation of young people who continued to live as though they were to die...we lived across the river on the Left Bank in the Bohemian world of poets, painters and writers."
       The filming of Hemingway's novel had a long gestation period. In Apr 1934, actress Ann Harding purchased the rights to the novel, intending to star as "Lady Brett Ashley," according to materials contained in the MPAA/PCA file on the film at the AMPAS Library. Leslie Howard was to play "Jake." In Dec 1944, Constance Bennett considered buying the rights from Harding, and planned to star in and produce the project for United Artists release, according to a Sep 1944 HR news item. According to a Mar 1949 LAT news item, Howard Hawks purchased the rights from Harding in 1949. At that time, Montgomery Clift and Margaret Sheridan were to star in Hawks's production for Twentieth Century-Fox. In 1952, Hawks left Fox to pursue a career as an independent producer-director, and took the property with him, which he intended to produce in Europe starring Dewey Martin, according to a Dec 1952 DV news item. By 1955, Hawks agreed to sell his interest in the novel back to Fox, but still planned to direct the film, according to an Oct 1955 DV news item.
       Correspondence between the would-be producers and the PCA during these years reveals why the project was so difficult to bring to fruition: In Hemingway's novel, Jake's war injuries resulted in his impotence and Lady Brett was depicted as a nymphomaniac. The PCA deemed the issues of impotence and nyphomania as "not proper for screen presentation," and thought the novel to be "salacious," its characters "promiscuous and immoral." After Fox bought the rights in 1955, a new approach to the topic was suggested that finally won approval from the PCA. In a memo, Twentieth Century-Fox production chief Darryl F. Zanuck proposed dropping all explicit references to Jake's impotence, thus divorcing it from a specific physical reason and instead putting it in the abstract realm of a "war injury." Zanuck's other tactic was to portray Lady Brett's problem not as nymphomania, but rather excessive drinking. Although the project finally won approval from the PCA because of these changes, in the final film, in Jake's dream sequence, which flashes back to his time at the hospital, Jake is explicitly told by the "Doctor" (Henry Daniell), that he is impotent.
       In Oct 1956, a HR news item announced that Henry King was to direct and Walter Reisch was to produce the film. Although a screenplay written by Reisch is contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, Reisch's contribution to the released film has not been determined. The legal records also add that Ben Wright was originally to play the doctor and José Ángel Espinosa was to appear as "Zizi."
       The city of Morelia, Mexico doubled for Pamplona, Spain, according to a May 1957 NYT article. Charles Clarke shot the annual running of the bulls in Pamplona. According to a May 1957 HR news item, location filming also took place in Paris and Biarritz, France. Zanuck directed some of the French sequences while Henry King was filming in Mexico. Studio publicity items contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library add that some interiors were shot at the Estudios Churubusco in Mexico City, Mexico. Modern sources note that Jorge Stahl, Jr. worked as director of photography, Manuel Topete was sound recordist, Roberto Silva served as art director and Luis Sánchez Tello served as production manager.
       Actor and future producer Robert Evans, who portrayed "Pedro Romero" in the film, entitled his autobiography The Kid Stays in the Picture because, according to Evans, during production of The Sun Also Rises , when King and others felt that Evans was not up to the role and should be replaced, Zanuck sent a telegram to King stating "The kid stays in the picture." Zanuck, King and Ava Gardner had previously worked together on the 1953 film The Snows of Kilimanjaro (see above). The Sun Also Rises marked the American screen debut of Juliette Greco. In 1984, NBC TV produced a miniseries based on Hemingway's work, starring Jane Seymour and Hart Bochner and directed by James Goldstone. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
1 Sep 56
p. 520.
Box Office
31 Aug 1957.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1952.
---
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1955.
---
Daily Variety
23 Aug 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Aug 57
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 56
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 57
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1957.
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 57
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 57
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 57
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
5 Mar 1949.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Aug 57
pp. 514-15.
New York Times
5 May 1957.
---
New York Times
23 Aug 57
p. 10.
New York Times
24 Aug 57
p. 12.
Variety
28 Aug 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dir of French seq
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Photog Spanish backgrounds
Cam op Spanish backgrounds
Asst cam Spanish backgrounds
Grip Spanish backgrounds
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ava Gardner's ward
Exec ward des
MUSIC
Guitar mus
Supv of Spanish mus
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Bullfight trainer
STAND INS
Robert Evan's double for bullfight seq
Errol Flynn's stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (New York, 1926).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises
Release Date:
September 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 23 August 1957
Production Date:
mid March--early June 1957 at Estudios Churubusco, Mexico City
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 August 1957
Copyright Number:
LP9313
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
129
Length(in feet):
11,647
Countries:
Mexico, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18549
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the end of World War I, Jake Barnes, an American soldier serving in Italy, decides to remain in Europe and resume his newspaper career at the Paris office of the Herald , joining the legion of expatriates who haunt the Left Bank. One day, Robert Cohn, a moneyed young man who aspires to be a novelist, visits Jake at his office. Suffering from ennui , Robert tries to persuade Jake to accompany him to South America, but Jake has already made arrangements to go to Spain. In the park, Jake shares a drink with Georgette, a world-weary prostitute, and then invites her to dinner. As the evening wears on, Georgette wonders why Jake has no sexual interest in her, and Jake explains that he was injured in the war. At a dance club, Jack chances upon Robert and facetiously introduces Georgette as his fiancée to a crass American couple. When Lady Brett Ashley enters the room, Robert is stunned by her beauty. Ignoring Robert, Brett greets Jake and asks him to dance. On the dance floor, Brett impulsively tells Jake that she loves him and asks him to leave with her. In a taxi, the two kiss and Brett then announces that she plans to marry Mike Campbell, a wealthy Scotsman. While stopping at another bar, Brett and Jake run into Robert again. After the crowd from the previous club arrives at the bar, Jake declares he is sickened by the "whole show." Questioned by Robert about Brett, Jake replies that she is an American ... +


At the end of World War I, Jake Barnes, an American soldier serving in Italy, decides to remain in Europe and resume his newspaper career at the Paris office of the Herald , joining the legion of expatriates who haunt the Left Bank. One day, Robert Cohn, a moneyed young man who aspires to be a novelist, visits Jake at his office. Suffering from ennui , Robert tries to persuade Jake to accompany him to South America, but Jake has already made arrangements to go to Spain. In the park, Jake shares a drink with Georgette, a world-weary prostitute, and then invites her to dinner. As the evening wears on, Georgette wonders why Jake has no sexual interest in her, and Jake explains that he was injured in the war. At a dance club, Jack chances upon Robert and facetiously introduces Georgette as his fiancée to a crass American couple. When Lady Brett Ashley enters the room, Robert is stunned by her beauty. Ignoring Robert, Brett greets Jake and asks him to dance. On the dance floor, Brett impulsively tells Jake that she loves him and asks him to leave with her. In a taxi, the two kiss and Brett then announces that she plans to marry Mike Campbell, a wealthy Scotsman. While stopping at another bar, Brett and Jake run into Robert again. After the crowd from the previous club arrives at the bar, Jake declares he is sickened by the "whole show." Questioned by Robert about Brett, Jake replies that she is an American whose English husband was killed during the war and cautions that she is a drunk and a drifter. That night, while lying in bed, Jake stares at the ceiling and dreams about his war injury. As Jake is being anesthetized prior to surgery, his last image is of Brett, in a nurse's uniform, comforting him. Throughout Jake's convalescence, Brett remains by his side, but upon learning that his wound has rendered him impotent, Jake disassociates himself from her. Jake is roused from his dream by Brett's voice, and when he gets up, he finds her standing outside his door with Count Mippipopolous, an admirer, bearing an armload of champagne. After a toast, Brett leaves with the count, returns to embrace Jake and then dashes out. The next day, Jake's boisterous friend Bill Gorton comes to Paris to accompany Jake on his sojourn through Spain. Upon arriving in Pamplona for the running of the bulls, Jake learns that Robert, Brett and Mike are also there. As the group assembles to watch the unloading of the bulls, Jake fumes at Brett for picking up Robert in San Sebastian. Mike, drunk and jealous, bellicosely declares that he is bankrupt and insults Robert. The next day, during the running of the bulls, Mike drunkenly waves his bounced check at one of the bulls. In the bullring, Pedro Romero, a dashing young bullfighter, singles Brett out of the audience. Later, at the hotel bar, Jake invites Pedro to join them for a drink and Brett expresses her admiration for his prowess. After a besotted Mike insults Robert once again, Brett confides to Jake that she has realized Mike is the wrong man for her. When Brett complains that Mike and Robert are behaving badly, Jake remarks upon her complicity in the situation. Later, Brett begins to flirt with Pedro at yet another bar. Jake, disgusted, leaves, and tormented by posters touting Pedro, flings a glass of red wine at one of them. Soon after, Mike, still inebriated, appears with a señorita on each arm, followed by Robert. When Jake refuses to tell Robert where Brett can be found, Robert, a former college boxing champion, slugs him, then notices the stained poster and storms out of the room. Bursting into Brett's hotel room, Robert finds Pedro there and in a jealous rage, starts pummeling the slight matador. The next morning, Jake, Bill and Mike gather at the town square and when Brett announces that Pedro is seriously injured, the boorish Mike knocks over their bar table. Asking Jake to walk with her, Brett stops in a church to pray and then appeals to Jake to look after Mike. That afternoon in the bullring, Pedro bows to Brett and then confronts the bull. When the crowd calls for more dynamism, Pedro, bruised and in pain, exuberantly kills the animal. Afterward, Brett goes to congratulate Pedro, and Robert apologizes to Jake for his behavior, explaining that he was hopelessly in love with Brett, but now plans to return to America to work things out with his mistress. Jake then proceeds to Brett's hotel room, where a drunken Mike informs him that she has run away with Pedro. As the town's festivities come to a close, Bill, Mike and Jake muse about their future. Mike, flat broke, plans to venture to the Riviera where he can live on credit. Bill is to sail for New York and Jake is going to Biarritz to relax before returning to work. Upon learning that Pedro has cancelled his next bullfight, Jake feels remorse for allowing Brett to derail the young man's life. In Biarritz, Jake receives an urgent telegram from Brett, begging him to join her in Madrid. There, Brett confides that fearful of destroying Pedro, she forced him to leave. After confiding that she had hoped Pedro would make her forget Jake, Brett asks Jake to take her with him and he consents. Leaving her belongings behind, Brett climbs into a cab with Jake and, after declaring that Jake is the only man she could ever love, Brett holds out hope that there may be an answer for them somewhere. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.