I Sell Anything (1934)

65 or 70 mins | Comedy-drama | 20 October 1934

Director:

Robert Florey

Producer:

Sam Bischoff

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

Terry Morse

Production Designer:

John Holden

Production Company:

First National Productions Corp.
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HISTORY

According to various news items in HR , Bette Davis was originally signed for the part played by Claire Dodd. Warner Bros. wanted William Frawley but Paramount refused to loan him, although they agreed to loan Roscoe Karns. Robert Florey replaced Ray Enright as ... More Less

According to various news items in HR , Bette Davis was originally signed for the part played by Claire Dodd. Warner Bros. wanted William Frawley but Paramount refused to loan him, although they agreed to loan Roscoe Karns. Robert Florey replaced Ray Enright as director. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Oct 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Dec 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jul 34
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 34
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 34
p. 4.
International Photographer
1 Aug 34
p. 16.
Motion Picture Herald
20 Oct 34
p. 48.
New York Times
27 Dec 34
p. 25.
Variety
1 Jan 35
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 October 1934
Production Date:
began 10 July 1934
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 October 1934
Copyright Number:
LP5014
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65 or 70
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
234
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Spot Cash Cutler runs a fake auction racket. Luring unsuspecting customers inside the store with a phony good deal, he then sells them as much as he can, running the prices up through the use of shills. He meets his match in Millicent Clark, a well-to-do woman who recognizes a buckle as a genuine antique, buys it for fifty dollars and sells it to a museum for five thousand dollars. When Spot Cash reads about the sale in the newspaper, he demands his cut from Millicent. She laughs at him, suggesting that he is wasting his time in the poorer section of town when he could be selling in a classier store on Broadway. Taking her advice, Spot Cash moves his operation along with his staff of three stooges and his secretary, Barbara, who is in love with him. Spot Cash, however, is infatuated with Millicent, who plans to use him for her own purposes. She is in love with Peter Van Gruen, an upper class New Yorker who has lost his inheritance. Millicent asks Spot Cash to auction off the contents of Peter's house, explaining that instead of actually selling heirlooms, they will sell fakes. Although Barbara warns him that deceit on this level could be dangerous, Spot Cash agrees to the plan. The auction goes very well, and Monk, one of Spot Cash's assistants, collects the money in a trunk in a locked room. Not realizing that the trunk contains the proceeds of the sale, Spot Cash auctions it along with the rest of the furnishings. As soon as Millicent learns what happened, she finds ... +


Spot Cash Cutler runs a fake auction racket. Luring unsuspecting customers inside the store with a phony good deal, he then sells them as much as he can, running the prices up through the use of shills. He meets his match in Millicent Clark, a well-to-do woman who recognizes a buckle as a genuine antique, buys it for fifty dollars and sells it to a museum for five thousand dollars. When Spot Cash reads about the sale in the newspaper, he demands his cut from Millicent. She laughs at him, suggesting that he is wasting his time in the poorer section of town when he could be selling in a classier store on Broadway. Taking her advice, Spot Cash moves his operation along with his staff of three stooges and his secretary, Barbara, who is in love with him. Spot Cash, however, is infatuated with Millicent, who plans to use him for her own purposes. She is in love with Peter Van Gruen, an upper class New Yorker who has lost his inheritance. Millicent asks Spot Cash to auction off the contents of Peter's house, explaining that instead of actually selling heirlooms, they will sell fakes. Although Barbara warns him that deceit on this level could be dangerous, Spot Cash agrees to the plan. The auction goes very well, and Monk, one of Spot Cash's assistants, collects the money in a trunk in a locked room. Not realizing that the trunk contains the proceeds of the sale, Spot Cash auctions it along with the rest of the furnishings. As soon as Millicent learns what happened, she finds the trunk, and before Spot Cash can react, she and Peter take the money and sail for Europe. Realizing that he was outclassed, Spot Cash notifies the police of the theft, marries Barbara and returns to his old neighborhood. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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