The Redhead and the Cowboy (1951)

82 mins | Western | March 1951

Director:

Leslie Fenton

Producer:

Irving Asher

Cinematographer:

Daniel L. Fapp

Editor:

Arthur Schmidt

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Henry Bumstead

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Beyond the Sunset . The order of the end credits differs slightly from the opening cast credits. In the end credits, King Donovan's character name is misspelled as "Munoe." The following written statement appears at the end of the opening credits: "New Mexico Territory 1865. The war between the states is in its last stages. A few remaining Confederate sympathizers called 'Copperheads' are putting up a secret last ditch fight. Renegades, outlaws, deserters from both armies pillage and raid. It is a period of burned ranches and looted wagon trains, of ambush and murder, with no man in the territory safe from the rising tide of violence."
       HR news items add Jack Kenney , George Holt, Anthony Smith, Willie Bloom, Dick Carlen, Polly Burson, Frank Cordell, Frosty Royce, Beau Anderson, Jack Fitzpatrick and John Roy to the cast, but the appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Location filming took place in Sedona, AZ, according to news items. According to a modern source, footage from the 1937 Paramount film Wells Fargo (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ) was used in The Redhead and the Cowboy ... More Less

The working title of this film was Beyond the Sunset . The order of the end credits differs slightly from the opening cast credits. In the end credits, King Donovan's character name is misspelled as "Munoe." The following written statement appears at the end of the opening credits: "New Mexico Territory 1865. The war between the states is in its last stages. A few remaining Confederate sympathizers called 'Copperheads' are putting up a secret last ditch fight. Renegades, outlaws, deserters from both armies pillage and raid. It is a period of burned ranches and looted wagon trains, of ambush and murder, with no man in the territory safe from the rising tide of violence."
       HR news items add Jack Kenney , George Holt, Anthony Smith, Willie Bloom, Dick Carlen, Polly Burson, Frank Cordell, Frosty Royce, Beau Anderson, Jack Fitzpatrick and John Roy to the cast, but the appearance of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Location filming took place in Sedona, AZ, according to news items. According to a modern source, footage from the 1937 Paramount film Wells Fargo (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ) was used in The Redhead and the Cowboy . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Dec 1950.
---
Daily Variety
7 Dec 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Dec 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 50
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 50
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Mar 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 50
p. 614.
New York Times
6 Jun 51
p. 37.
Newsweek
26 Feb 1951.
---
Variety
13 Dec 50
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Beyond the Sunset
Release Date:
March 1951
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 15 March 1951
Production Date:
25 April--late May 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
22 February 1951
Copyright Number:
LP768
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in feet):
7,421
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14610
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

At the end of the Civil War, in the New Mexico territory, cowboy Gil Kyle rides to Golden Trail, after being attacked by two men looking for Confederate sympathizers, or Copperheads. In the pro-Union saloon, politically neutral Gil attracts the attention of Candace Bronson, who flirts with him, then asks, "How many Mondays in a Thursday?" When Gil acts perplexed by the redhead's question, Candace excuses herself and goes to a back room, where she repeats the sentence to a waiting stranger. The stranger utters the words, "Broken sombrero, 13, 26," then falls dead from a knife wound. Having heard the fall, Gil enters, followed by the sheriff and a man named Dunn Jeffers. While the sheriff is interrogating Gil about the dead man, Candace sneaks off, leaving Gil without an alibi. Gil grabs Dunn's gun and flees on his horse, just behind Candace. On the trail, Gil intercepts Candace, who promises to clear him once she has reached her destination. Spotting the sheriff's posse approaching, Gil and Candace take off, riding all night until they come to a ranch house. Inside they find a dog lying on the dead body of rancher Carson. After Candace finds a note pinned to Carson, which reads, "Death to Copperheads," Gil surmises that she is a Confederate spy and kisses her. Just as Gil notices that the dog's collar has the Lazy Y brand on it, Dunn rides up, claiming he has come to buy Carson's cattle. While a suspicious Gil questions Dunn, Candace slips away. Dunn then claims that he, too, is a Copperhead spy and threatens to turn Gil over to ... +


At the end of the Civil War, in the New Mexico territory, cowboy Gil Kyle rides to Golden Trail, after being attacked by two men looking for Confederate sympathizers, or Copperheads. In the pro-Union saloon, politically neutral Gil attracts the attention of Candace Bronson, who flirts with him, then asks, "How many Mondays in a Thursday?" When Gil acts perplexed by the redhead's question, Candace excuses herself and goes to a back room, where she repeats the sentence to a waiting stranger. The stranger utters the words, "Broken sombrero, 13, 26," then falls dead from a knife wound. Having heard the fall, Gil enters, followed by the sheriff and a man named Dunn Jeffers. While the sheriff is interrogating Gil about the dead man, Candace sneaks off, leaving Gil without an alibi. Gil grabs Dunn's gun and flees on his horse, just behind Candace. On the trail, Gil intercepts Candace, who promises to clear him once she has reached her destination. Spotting the sheriff's posse approaching, Gil and Candace take off, riding all night until they come to a ranch house. Inside they find a dog lying on the dead body of rancher Carson. After Candace finds a note pinned to Carson, which reads, "Death to Copperheads," Gil surmises that she is a Confederate spy and kisses her. Just as Gil notices that the dog's collar has the Lazy Y brand on it, Dunn rides up, claiming he has come to buy Carson's cattle. While a suspicious Gil questions Dunn, Candace slips away. Dunn then claims that he, too, is a Copperhead spy and threatens to turn Gil over to the approaching posse unless he takes him to Candace. Gil and Dunn elude the posse and ride to the Lazy Y. There, they meet little Mary Barrett and her mother and father, who claim no knowledge of Candace. As Gil and Dunn are leaving, however, Mary gives them an Indian doll, noting that earlier she had given one to a "pretty lady." Gil and Dunn conclude that the doll is a Copperhead signal to go to a trading post near Ft. Jackson, and with the posse still pursuing them, head there. Farther up the trail, Candace, meanwhile, is forced to stop at a deserted cabin when her horse gets a rock stuck in its hoof. Two men, Brock and Perry, who have been following Candace, corner her in the cabin and, aware she is a spy, offer her a deal if she reveals where she is going. Before Candace can respond, Gil and Dunn show up and overwhelm Brock and Perry, whom Dunn identifies as mercenaries. After Dunn sends Gil and Candace outside, he tells Brock and Perry to follow him, then pretends to shoot them. Upon arriving at the trading post, Candace displays the Indian doll and says the code words. Candace, Gil and Dunn are taken to see Lamartine, who claims to be a Confederate colonel, and Candace finally delivers the "broken sombrero" message. Later, Lamartine reveals to the trio that the message has to do with a Union gold shipment, which he and his men plan to steal. Lamartine then exposes Dunn as a Union intelligence officer. In turn, Dunn calls Lamartine a renegade and accuses him of wanting the gold for himself, not the Confederacy. Lamartine dismisses Dunn's claim and orders Brock and Perry, who have been captured by his men, to be executed. After sending Candace off to his camp, Lamartine locks Gil and Dunn in a room and instructs his henchman, Munroe, to kill them once Lamartine has left the post. Gil and Dunn manage to escape the room but are immediately confronted by a gun-wielding Munroe. Having told Gil the gold shipment's route, Dunn instructs Gil to flee, then exchanges fatal gunfire with Munroe. Gil races to the Union camp and informs Capt. Andrews about Lamartine's plan. When Lamartine's soldiers, dressed in their Confederate uniforms, attack the Union wagon train the next day, they are met with equal force. During the bloody battle, Gil rushes off to find Candace, who is being held in Lamartine's wagon. As Candace and Lamartine fight for control of the racing wagon, Gil jumps on board and overpowers Lamartine. After the renegades are defeated, Andrews allows Candace to go, and she and Gil look forward to a happy future together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.