The Gay Caballero (1932)

60 or 62 mins | Western | 28 February 1932

Director:

Alfred Werker

Cinematographer:

George Schneiderman

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Wright

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was The Gay Bandit . The novel originally appeared in serial form in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Dec 1930--May 1931). According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department and in their Produced Scripts Collection, both at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Bert Sebell and J. M. Kerrigan are listed as co-directors of this film on early contract forms for actors and in the final shooting script, dated 21 Nov 1931. Sebell and Kerrigan were also listed in the HF and MPH production charts; however, in a trade paper advertising billing sheet dated 30 Nov 1931 in the legal records, Sebell's and Kerrigan's names are crossed out, and Alfred Werker's is typed in their place, and in contract forms for actors beginning 8 Dec 1931, Werker's name is listed. While Sebell and Kerrigan most likely were involved in pre-production work on this film, it is not known if they actually directed any scenes. A NYT news item noted that both George O'Brien and Victor McLaglen were excellent boxers: O'Brien was one of the outstanding boxers in the U.S. Navy, while McLaglen fought Jack Johnson four rounds to a draw. The 1940 Twentieth Century-Fox film of the same title was not based on the same source as ... More Less

The working title of the film was The Gay Bandit . The novel originally appeared in serial form in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Dec 1930--May 1931). According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department and in their Produced Scripts Collection, both at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Bert Sebell and J. M. Kerrigan are listed as co-directors of this film on early contract forms for actors and in the final shooting script, dated 21 Nov 1931. Sebell and Kerrigan were also listed in the HF and MPH production charts; however, in a trade paper advertising billing sheet dated 30 Nov 1931 in the legal records, Sebell's and Kerrigan's names are crossed out, and Alfred Werker's is typed in their place, and in contract forms for actors beginning 8 Dec 1931, Werker's name is listed. While Sebell and Kerrigan most likely were involved in pre-production work on this film, it is not known if they actually directed any scenes. A NYT news item noted that both George O'Brien and Victor McLaglen were excellent boxers: O'Brien was one of the outstanding boxers in the U.S. Navy, while McLaglen fought Jack Johnson four rounds to a draw. The 1940 Twentieth Century-Fox film of the same title was not based on the same source as this. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Feb 32
p. 11.
Harrison's Reports
2 Apr 32
p. 54.
HF
5 Dec 31
p. 12.
HF
16 Jan 32
p. 44.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 32
p. 5.
International Photographer
1 Mar 32
p. 32.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Jan 32
p. 44.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Apr 32
p. 38.
New York Times
26 Mar 32
p. 17.
New York Times
27-Mar-32
---
Variety
29 Mar 32
p. 25.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
PRODUCTION MISC
Dialectician
Still photog
Bus mgr
STAND INS
Double for George O'Brien and stunts
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Gay Bandit of the Border by Tom Gill (New York, 1931).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Gay Bandit
Release Date:
28 February 1932
Production Date:
early December 1931--mid January 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 January 1932
Copyright Number:
LP2823
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 62
Length(in feet):
5,400
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Ted Radcliffe, known for his football and wrestling heroics, comes West to seek his inheritance after his father dies. Because he finds no one at the train station near the Mexican border where he debarks, he begins to walk through the desert toward the ranch of his father's friend, Bob Harkness. He finds Adela Dolores O'Brien Morales, an Irish-Spanish-Mexican señorita whom "Don Bob" sent to meet him, underneath her stalled car. After the car is fixed, they witness the bandit "El Coyote," whom Adela says is the only friend of the poor peon, chase and kill another man. A note left on the body by El Coyote identifies the dead man as a traitor. At Bob's ranch, Bob explains that he supports El Coyote in his war against Adela's uncle, the wealthy Paco Morales, who has been trying to drive the settlers out and establish an empire for himself, and he says that Ted's father lost all his money because Morales withdrew his support for an irrigation project. Bob hires Ted as his foreman and takes him to the Fiesta of the Rains, at which Adela dances. Ted flirts with Adela, and Jito, Morales' egotistical protégé, is annoyed when she invites Ted to go riding with her. When Adela learns that Morales' vaqueros are tormenting villagers, she and Ted ride there. Ted is captured after he hits a vaquero, and one of the villagers, Felipe Dominquez, whom Morales had ordered to leave his land, is about to be strung up when El Coyote and his men ride up. El Coyote has one of his men deliver a message to Jito that for every ... +


Ted Radcliffe, known for his football and wrestling heroics, comes West to seek his inheritance after his father dies. Because he finds no one at the train station near the Mexican border where he debarks, he begins to walk through the desert toward the ranch of his father's friend, Bob Harkness. He finds Adela Dolores O'Brien Morales, an Irish-Spanish-Mexican señorita whom "Don Bob" sent to meet him, underneath her stalled car. After the car is fixed, they witness the bandit "El Coyote," whom Adela says is the only friend of the poor peon, chase and kill another man. A note left on the body by El Coyote identifies the dead man as a traitor. At Bob's ranch, Bob explains that he supports El Coyote in his war against Adela's uncle, the wealthy Paco Morales, who has been trying to drive the settlers out and establish an empire for himself, and he says that Ted's father lost all his money because Morales withdrew his support for an irrigation project. Bob hires Ted as his foreman and takes him to the Fiesta of the Rains, at which Adela dances. Ted flirts with Adela, and Jito, Morales' egotistical protégé, is annoyed when she invites Ted to go riding with her. When Adela learns that Morales' vaqueros are tormenting villagers, she and Ted ride there. Ted is captured after he hits a vaquero, and one of the villagers, Felipe Dominquez, whom Morales had ordered to leave his land, is about to be strung up when El Coyote and his men ride up. El Coyote has one of his men deliver a message to Jito that for every peon molested, a vaquero must die, and that Morales must give Dominguez 500 gold pesos. El Coyote, who is really Bob, shoots a knife from Jito's hand when Jito threatens him. During a picnic, Ted and Adela's horses run off, and they are forced to spend the night in the desert. Before going to sleep, Ted kisses Adela goodnight. The next day, when they return and Morales insinuates that they have become lovers, Adela, in defiance, kisses Ted in front of her uncle and the jealous Jito. Bob's friend, Major Lawrence Blount, whose American cavalry forces have joined the search for El Coyote at the request of the Mexican government, invites him, Ted and Morales to the camp to witness a man who has been offered 5,000 gold pesos identify El Coyote. While they wait for the informer to arrive, Bob goes out for a smoke. The informer is then shot and killed, and the soldiers fire at the elusive killer. As Ted drives Bob away, Bob slumps in the car from the wound he has suffered. Ted then realizes his identity and vows to fight on his side. Adela secretly meets Ted, and as they confess their love and kiss goodbye, Jito and his men see them. Jito tells Morales, who orders Adela confined to his hacienda. When Bob learns that forty of his men have been trapped in a pass by the Americans and that Blount has ordered his soldiers to open fire with machine guns if El Coyote's men do not turn over their leader, Bob reveals his identity to Blount so that his men can go free. Disguised as El Coyote, Ted then steals horses from vaqueros, ties some to posts, steals some of their hats and forces Morales to pay 500 gold pesos to Dominquez. Disappointed now that he thinks Bob lied to him, Blount nevertheless lets him go free. Bob tells Blount that he does not think El Coyote will ride again. In retaliation for their humiliation, Morales' men burn Dominquez' house, destroy his crops and kidnap his little daughter. When Ted learns that Morales has agreed that Jito will marry Adela, he rides to Morales' and, after locking Morales in a closet and fighting his servants, rescues Adela as Jito struggles with her and drops him out the window into a cactus patch. As Morales, who has broken out of the closet, aims his gun at Adela and Ted, Dominquez throws a knife at Morales and kills him. Adela and Ted ride to the American side of the border, which Adela now calls "our" side, and plan to marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.