Old Overland Trail (1953)

60 mins | Western | 25 February 1953

Director:

William Witney

Writer:

Milton Raison

Cinematographer:

John MacBurnie

Editor:

Harold Minter

Production Designer:

Frank Arrigo

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The film's working titles were Overland Trail Riders and Song of the Overland Trail . According to a Sep 1952 HR news item, portions of the film were shot on location at Burro Flats in San Fernando Valley, CA. ... More Less

The film's working titles were Overland Trail Riders and Song of the Overland Trail . According to a Sep 1952 HR news item, portions of the film were shot on location at Burro Flats in San Fernando Valley, CA. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Feb 1953.
---
Daily Variety
20 Feb 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 52
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 52
p. 5, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 1952
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
28 Feb 53
p. 1742.
The Exhibitor
11 Mar 53
p. 3480.
Variety
25 Feb 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cowboy's Dream of Heaven," words and music by Jack Elliott
"Work for the Night Is Coming," words and music by Annie L. Coghill, Lowell Mason and Darol Rice
"Just a Wanderin' Buckaroo," traditional.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Overland Trail Riders
Song of the Overland Trail
Release Date:
25 February 1953
Production Date:
September 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 January 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2528
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
5,401
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16166
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rex Allen, who is working for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and his partner, Slim Pickens, are sent west to investigate some Apache uprisings near the construction site of a new railroad spur line. Near the town of Red Creek, Rex and Slim encounter a couple of drunken Indians and subdue them. Moments later, Chief Black Hawk rides up, and Rex warns him to stay on the reservation. After Rex and Slim leave, however, Black Hawk meets with some white men, who give him rifles. In town, Rex and Slim arrive at the headquarters of Anchor Construction, where Rex's older brother Jim is working. Co-owner John Anchor tells Rex that Jim is leading a wagon train of settlers from the drought-stricken Midwest and expresses his fears that the Indian troubles will interfere with the company's work on the spur line. Rex and Slim decide to meet the wagon train, and while camped, hear gunfire and discover that the wagon train is under attack. To Rex's surprise, however, the Indians ride off after destroying the contents of a few wagons. Afterward, Rex rides to the reservation, and Jim reports to Anchor. Jim accuses Anchor of fomenting the attack, charges that, though true, Anchor denies. Anchor then tells Jim that he will employ the settlers for low wages, which will increase the company's profits. At the reservation, Rex accuses Black Hawk of leading the attack, and the angry chief challenges him to a fight. Rex wins the fight, but stops short of killing the Indian. Meanwhile, the settlers begin work on the railroad, but do not receive even their meager wages when ... +


Rex Allen, who is working for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and his partner, Slim Pickens, are sent west to investigate some Apache uprisings near the construction site of a new railroad spur line. Near the town of Red Creek, Rex and Slim encounter a couple of drunken Indians and subdue them. Moments later, Chief Black Hawk rides up, and Rex warns him to stay on the reservation. After Rex and Slim leave, however, Black Hawk meets with some white men, who give him rifles. In town, Rex and Slim arrive at the headquarters of Anchor Construction, where Rex's older brother Jim is working. Co-owner John Anchor tells Rex that Jim is leading a wagon train of settlers from the drought-stricken Midwest and expresses his fears that the Indian troubles will interfere with the company's work on the spur line. Rex and Slim decide to meet the wagon train, and while camped, hear gunfire and discover that the wagon train is under attack. To Rex's surprise, however, the Indians ride off after destroying the contents of a few wagons. Afterward, Rex rides to the reservation, and Jim reports to Anchor. Jim accuses Anchor of fomenting the attack, charges that, though true, Anchor denies. Anchor then tells Jim that he will employ the settlers for low wages, which will increase the company's profits. At the reservation, Rex accuses Black Hawk of leading the attack, and the angry chief challenges him to a fight. Rex wins the fight, but stops short of killing the Indian. Meanwhile, the settlers begin work on the railroad, but do not receive even their meager wages when the stagecoach carrying the funds is reported robbed. Unknown to the settlers, the stagecoach drivers are in league with Anchor. When the settlers complain that they must buy supplies, Anchor offers to pay them with scrip, which he promises will be redeemable in the town store. Later, when the storekeeper redeems the scrip for only twenty-five cents on the dollar, Rex accuses Jim of participating in a swindle. The two brothers fight fiercely. When the fight is over, Rex and Slim hold up the stage before the stagecoach driver hands the money to Anchor. Jim, meanwhile, tells Anchor that he wants to end their partnership, so Anchor kills him, then blames his death on Rex. When Rex returns with the payroll money, Mary Peterson, one of the settlers, warns Rex that he is wanted for Jim's murder, and he and Slim hide out in the hills. Anchor secretly offers Black Hawk enough guns for the entire tribe if he will capture Rex and Slim. When Black Hawk finds them, he admits that Anchor is behind all the trouble. Unknown to Anchor, Rex has managed to send a telegram to Washington, D.C., apprising his superiors of the situation, and when Anchor learns that there will be an investigation, he decides to steal the final payroll and leave town. However, because the payroll is being sent by train, Anchor needs Black Hawk's help. When Anchor arrives at the reservation without the promised guns, Black Hawk angrily refuses to help him, and Anchor shoots him. Anchor then convinces the other Indians to help him destroy the railroad. After they leave, the wounded Black Hawk cuts Rex free in return for Rex sparing his life earlier. Rex and Slim hurriedly rouse the settlers, and they head for the spur line. During the ensuing fight, Anchor escapes, followed by Rex. Anchor tries to ambush Rex, but Black Hawk kills him, and then dies himself. With the troublemakers all dead, the settlers and Indians work together to develop the area. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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