Wagons West (1952)

70 mins | Western | 6 July 1952

Director:

Ford Beebe

Cinematographer:

Harry Neumann

Production Designer:

Martin Obzina

Production Companies:

Allied Artists Productions, Inc., Silvermine Productions Co.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film begins with the following written foreword: "The courage and strength of the men and women who settled the United States in the westward movement of the Nineteenth Century has become an honored and legendary part of our history. The pioneering spirit of these people, remarkable as it was, could not have proved so effective without direction and guidance. A handful of men, known as wagonmasters, made it their business to guide pioneer families westward across the mountains and the plains. Whatever their motives might have been in choosing such careers, the fact remains that without them our colonization of the West would have taken a lot longer than it did. This is the story of one such wagonmaster--Jeff ... More Less

The film begins with the following written foreword: "The courage and strength of the men and women who settled the United States in the westward movement of the Nineteenth Century has become an honored and legendary part of our history. The pioneering spirit of these people, remarkable as it was, could not have proved so effective without direction and guidance. A handful of men, known as wagonmasters, made it their business to guide pioneer families westward across the mountains and the plains. Whatever their motives might have been in choosing such careers, the fact remains that without them our colonization of the West would have taken a lot longer than it did. This is the story of one such wagonmaster--Jeff Curtis." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Jun 1952.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jun 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 51
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 51
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Jun 52
p. 1418.
Variety
18 Jun 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Mus ed
SET DECORATORS
Settings
Set cont
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
Col consultant
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 July 1952
Production Date:
late September--mid October 1951
addl scenes early November 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 June 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1796
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Cinecolor
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,303
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15681
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As Jeff Curtis is on his way to Joplin to lead a wagon train west, he picks up a runaway boy, Ben Wilkins, and Ben's dog, Buzz. Jeff takes the boy back to the Wilkins family in Joplin, and there meets Ben's pretty sister Ann. Young Ben had run away because Cyrus Cook, the organizer of the train, had ordered the dog killed and wanted to leave Ben's sick father Sam behind. Jeff takes an immediate dislike to Cook, and Cook's two braggart nephews, Clay and Gaylord, and gets into a fierce fight with Clay after the young man hits Ben. The train is then delayed until Arch Lawrence and his pregnant wife Alice finally arrive. That night, Jeff eats dinner with the Wilkinses, and when he and Ann begin to flirt with each other, a jealous Gaylord warns him to keep away from her. A day or so later, Jeff stops to talk to some friendly Indians, further infuriating the hotheaded Cooks. When a band of renegade Indians try to steal their horses a few days later, Jeff tries to stop them without using violence, but Clay shoots and kills their chief. Furious, Jeff orders Cook to keep his nephews on the wagon. Some days later, as smoke signals rise into the air, two U.S. Marshals overtake the train in search of wagoneers who have been smuggling rifles to the Cheyennes. The Cooks immediately suspect Arch because his cousin was a bank robber, but when Cook attacks Arch, Jeff defends the young man and tells the Cooks to leave. Seeing that the Cooks are unafraid of entering Indian territory alone, Jeff deduces that they are ... +


As Jeff Curtis is on his way to Joplin to lead a wagon train west, he picks up a runaway boy, Ben Wilkins, and Ben's dog, Buzz. Jeff takes the boy back to the Wilkins family in Joplin, and there meets Ben's pretty sister Ann. Young Ben had run away because Cyrus Cook, the organizer of the train, had ordered the dog killed and wanted to leave Ben's sick father Sam behind. Jeff takes an immediate dislike to Cook, and Cook's two braggart nephews, Clay and Gaylord, and gets into a fierce fight with Clay after the young man hits Ben. The train is then delayed until Arch Lawrence and his pregnant wife Alice finally arrive. That night, Jeff eats dinner with the Wilkinses, and when he and Ann begin to flirt with each other, a jealous Gaylord warns him to keep away from her. A day or so later, Jeff stops to talk to some friendly Indians, further infuriating the hotheaded Cooks. When a band of renegade Indians try to steal their horses a few days later, Jeff tries to stop them without using violence, but Clay shoots and kills their chief. Furious, Jeff orders Cook to keep his nephews on the wagon. Some days later, as smoke signals rise into the air, two U.S. Marshals overtake the train in search of wagoneers who have been smuggling rifles to the Cheyennes. The Cooks immediately suspect Arch because his cousin was a bank robber, but when Cook attacks Arch, Jeff defends the young man and tells the Cooks to leave. Seeing that the Cooks are unafraid of entering Indian territory alone, Jeff deduces that they are the arms smugglers, and that the smoke signals were a message to them. He tracks them, not realizing that Ben is following him. When he finds Clay and Cook's wife Elizabeth in their wagon, it is Ben who distracts them long enough for Jeff to apprehend them. Searching their wagon, Jeff finds the contraband rifles, a discovery that horrifies Elizabeth. Jeff brings Clay and Elizabeth back to the train and warns everyone there to arm themselves against an attack by Cook and Gaylord. The two men soon arrive with a gang of Indians and begin shooting. During the ensuing gunfight, Ben sees Clay about to kill Jeff and jumps on him, inadvertently pushing Clay into the path of an Indian arrow. The settlers successfully defend the train, and after the Indians finally retreat, Jeff orders all the rifles to be burned. Later, Jeff meets with the Indian chief and strikes a bargain, promising not to inform General Custer, who is rounding up all the Indians in the area, about the tribe if the train is allowed a safe passage. Just then, Arch announces that Alice has given birth to twins, a boy and a girl. Everyone celebrates, except Ben, who scowls in disgust when he sees Jeff and Ann embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.