Mohawk (1956)

79-80 mins | Drama | April 1956

Director:

Kurt Neumann

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Wm. B. Murphy

Production Designer:

Ernst Fegté

Production Company:

National Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Working titles for the film included Mohawk Massacre and Mohawk: A Legend of the Iroquis . The released film contained the phrase "A legend of the Iroquis..." above the opening title. According to news items, Peter Lawford was initially cast in the leading role, Maurice Geraghty was to direct and Twentieth Century-Fox acquired distribution rights to the film in mid-Dec 1955, after the picture was completed. Information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that much of the film was shot on location in ... More Less

Working titles for the film included Mohawk Massacre and Mohawk: A Legend of the Iroquis . The released film contained the phrase "A legend of the Iroquis..." above the opening title. According to news items, Peter Lawford was initially cast in the leading role, Maurice Geraghty was to direct and Twentieth Century-Fox acquired distribution rights to the film in mid-Dec 1955, after the picture was completed. Information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that much of the film was shot on location in Utah. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Mar 1956.
---
Daily Variety
13 Dec 1955.
---
Daily Variety
21 Mar 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Apr 56
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1955.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 55
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 55
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 56
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
21 Mar 1956.
---
Motion Picture Daily
21 Mar 1946.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Mar 56
p. 833.
Variety
21 Mar 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Scr and story
Scr and story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward des
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial supv
Exec asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"Mohawk" and "Love Plays the Strings of My Banjo," music by Edward L. Alperson, Jr., lyrics by Paul Herrick.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Mohawk Massacre
Mohawk: A Legend of the Iroquis
Release Date:
April 1956
Production Date:
August 1955 at Republic Studios
Copyright Claimant:
National Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 April 1955
Copyright Number:
LP5829
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathé Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
79-80
Length(in feet):
7,146
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17730
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In eighteenth-century New York, early Mohawk Valley settler Butler, who wants to keep the valley for himself, is alarmed when a new group of settlers arrives and warns Mohawk Chief Kowanen that the settlers have brought a shipment of arms with them. Kowanen refuses to declare war on the white man, explaining that there is enough land for all. When Rokhawah, a Tuscarora brave, warns that the white man took his own tribe's land, however, Kowanen's son Keoga organizes a raiding party to steal the muskets from the fort. Meanwhile, artist Jonathan Adams, commissioned by the Massachusetts Society to paint landscapes of the valley, is torn between his attentions to local barmaid Greta and his visiting fiancée, a proper Boston society woman named Cynthia Stanhope. That night, Keoga and his beautiful sister Onida secretly lead the raiding party into the fort. As they are stealing the arms, however, a guard spots them and shooting erupts. All of the braves escape or are shot, leaving Onida trapped inside the fort. Jonathan finds her hiding in his cabin and, struck by her beauty, smuggles her out of the fort the next morning. Realizing that Jonathan bears no ill will against Indians, Onida asks him to observe the ways of her people and then explain to the white man that the Mohawk want to live in peace. Jonathan eagerly agrees, and while he is visiting the village, he falls in love with Onida. At the fort, Greta and Cynthia fear Jonathan has been attacked by the Mohawk and urge Captain Langley to take action. Eager to be rid of both the Mohawk and the ... +


In eighteenth-century New York, early Mohawk Valley settler Butler, who wants to keep the valley for himself, is alarmed when a new group of settlers arrives and warns Mohawk Chief Kowanen that the settlers have brought a shipment of arms with them. Kowanen refuses to declare war on the white man, explaining that there is enough land for all. When Rokhawah, a Tuscarora brave, warns that the white man took his own tribe's land, however, Kowanen's son Keoga organizes a raiding party to steal the muskets from the fort. Meanwhile, artist Jonathan Adams, commissioned by the Massachusetts Society to paint landscapes of the valley, is torn between his attentions to local barmaid Greta and his visiting fiancée, a proper Boston society woman named Cynthia Stanhope. That night, Keoga and his beautiful sister Onida secretly lead the raiding party into the fort. As they are stealing the arms, however, a guard spots them and shooting erupts. All of the braves escape or are shot, leaving Onida trapped inside the fort. Jonathan finds her hiding in his cabin and, struck by her beauty, smuggles her out of the fort the next morning. Realizing that Jonathan bears no ill will against Indians, Onida asks him to observe the ways of her people and then explain to the white man that the Mohawk want to live in peace. Jonathan eagerly agrees, and while he is visiting the village, he falls in love with Onida. At the fort, Greta and Cynthia fear Jonathan has been attacked by the Mohawk and urge Captain Langley to take action. Eager to be rid of both the Mohawk and the settlers, Butler warns that the Indians will slaughter all the settlers if their village is not destroyed first. Langley, who respects the Mohawk, visits the village and urges Jonathan to return home in order to quiet the alarmed populace. As the artist heads back to the fort with Keoga, however, Butler, hiding behind a tree, shoots the young brave. Jonathan brings Keoga's body back to the village, but when Rokhawah convinces the tribe to declare war because of the killing, Jonathan becomes their prisoner. Onida helps him to escape, and he returns to the fort to warn the settlers. Jonathan surmises that Butler killed Keoga, whereupon Butler is ejected from the fort and killed by the approaching warriors. The battle has already begun, however, and before reinforcements arrive to save the fort at the last moment, many are killed. Although he is now a prisoner, Kowanen declares that all of the Iroquois, including the Mohawk and the Tuscarora, will drive the white man out of the valley. Upon learning that Butler caused all the trouble, however, he relents and makes peace with Langley. Cynthia returns to Boston with Jonathan's paintings, while the artist goes to live with Onida and the Mohawk tribe. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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