Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Sioux Uprising . A Sep 1952 HR news item reports that Stephen McNally was originally cast as "Stephen Cook," but was replaced by Lyle Bettger after McNally's wife fell ill. A 26 Jul 1952 LAT news item notes that Alexis Smith was originally scheduled to play the female lead. According to a preliminary Universal cast listing, Rosa Rey was to appear in the role of "Heyoka." Studio publicity materials state that local Oregon Native Americans were cast as Sioux in the film, and identify the tribes as Walla Walla, Cayuse and Umatilla. According to contemporary sources, the film was shot on location in Pendleton and Portland, OR.
       As depicted in the film, Stand Watie (1806--1871) was a Cherokee leader who sided with the Confederacy during the early years of the Civil War, and commanded two regiments of the Cherokee Mounted Rifles. On 10 May 1864, he received the commission of brigadier general, becoming the first Native American so promoted. In 1865, after the U.S. government began building a road from Wyoming's Ft. Laramie to Montana, Red Cloud (1822--1909), chief of the Bad Face band of the Oglalas and leader of Sioux and Cheyenne bands, led his braves in attacks on U.S. forces designed to stop the flow of settlers. During the next two years, in what was dubbed Red Cloud's War, the warrior and his braves captured Army construction troops on the Bozeman Trail and killed many whites. In 1868, Red Cloud agreed to have his people settled on the Red Cloud Agency in ... More Less

The working title of this film was Sioux Uprising . A Sep 1952 HR news item reports that Stephen McNally was originally cast as "Stephen Cook," but was replaced by Lyle Bettger after McNally's wife fell ill. A 26 Jul 1952 LAT news item notes that Alexis Smith was originally scheduled to play the female lead. According to a preliminary Universal cast listing, Rosa Rey was to appear in the role of "Heyoka." Studio publicity materials state that local Oregon Native Americans were cast as Sioux in the film, and identify the tribes as Walla Walla, Cayuse and Umatilla. According to contemporary sources, the film was shot on location in Pendleton and Portland, OR.
       As depicted in the film, Stand Watie (1806--1871) was a Cherokee leader who sided with the Confederacy during the early years of the Civil War, and commanded two regiments of the Cherokee Mounted Rifles. On 10 May 1864, he received the commission of brigadier general, becoming the first Native American so promoted. In 1865, after the U.S. government began building a road from Wyoming's Ft. Laramie to Montana, Red Cloud (1822--1909), chief of the Bad Face band of the Oglalas and leader of Sioux and Cheyenne bands, led his braves in attacks on U.S. forces designed to stop the flow of settlers. During the next two years, in what was dubbed Red Cloud's War, the warrior and his braves captured Army construction troops on the Bozeman Trail and killed many whites. In 1868, Red Cloud agreed to have his people settled on the Red Cloud Agency in Nebraska. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Jul 1953.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jun 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Jul 53
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
27 Jun 53
p. 104.
Hollywood Citizen-News
1 Aug 1953.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Sep 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 52
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 52
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 52
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 52
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 53
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
1 Aug 1953.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1953.
---
Motion Picture Daily
2 Jul 1953.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Jun 53
p. 1886.
New York Times
18 Jul 53
p. 6.
The Exhibitor
1 Jul 53
p. 3549.
Variety
24 Jun 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Tech adv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Technicolor tech
Technicolor tech
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sioux Uprising
Release Date:
July 1953
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Chicago, IL: 26 June 1953
Production Date:
2 October--8 November 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co.
Copyright Date:
8 May 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2557
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
79-80
Length(in feet):
7,213
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16310
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During the Civil War, livery stable owner Joan Britton learns that Union forces are in desperate need of horses and asks her cook, Heyoka, to help her find the great herds kept by the Sioux. On their way to the Sioux village, Joan and Heyoka are secretly tracked by horse trader Stephen Cook, who wants the valuable horses for himself. At the village, Chief Red Cloud tells Joan that the horses, a gift from the Nez Perce, are sacred and therefore not for sale. After eavesdropping from behind a tree, Cook decides to steal the horses, and returns later with his men. The Indians try unsuccessfully to stop the thieves, and a horse and brave are shot in the skirmish. Physician Jonathan Westgate then arrives in the Sioux village and helps Red Cloud to heal the injured horse. Red Cloud explains that the tribe has elected not to pursue the horse thieves, fearing that the Cavalry might come and appropriate their remaining land. Red Cloud gives Jonathan a horse, and the physician promises to help locate the thieves. In town, Jonathan befriends blacksmith Ahab Jones and soon falls in love with Joan. Explaining that he gave up medicine because he was unable to help many dying Union soldiers, Jonathan sets up shop as the town veterinarian. That day, Cook arrives with three hundred horses, which he claims he bought from another dealer. Jonathan, however, removes an arrowhead from the horse of Cook's foreman and immediately suspects him in the horse theft. Later, Jonathan learns that the local horse ranchers are angry because Cook's men have been intimidating other horsemen attempting to sell to the Cavalry. ... +


During the Civil War, livery stable owner Joan Britton learns that Union forces are in desperate need of horses and asks her cook, Heyoka, to help her find the great herds kept by the Sioux. On their way to the Sioux village, Joan and Heyoka are secretly tracked by horse trader Stephen Cook, who wants the valuable horses for himself. At the village, Chief Red Cloud tells Joan that the horses, a gift from the Nez Perce, are sacred and therefore not for sale. After eavesdropping from behind a tree, Cook decides to steal the horses, and returns later with his men. The Indians try unsuccessfully to stop the thieves, and a horse and brave are shot in the skirmish. Physician Jonathan Westgate then arrives in the Sioux village and helps Red Cloud to heal the injured horse. Red Cloud explains that the tribe has elected not to pursue the horse thieves, fearing that the Cavalry might come and appropriate their remaining land. Red Cloud gives Jonathan a horse, and the physician promises to help locate the thieves. In town, Jonathan befriends blacksmith Ahab Jones and soon falls in love with Joan. Explaining that he gave up medicine because he was unable to help many dying Union soldiers, Jonathan sets up shop as the town veterinarian. That day, Cook arrives with three hundred horses, which he claims he bought from another dealer. Jonathan, however, removes an arrowhead from the horse of Cook's foreman and immediately suspects him in the horse theft. Later, Jonathan learns that the local horse ranchers are angry because Cook's men have been intimidating other horsemen attempting to sell to the Cavalry. Jonathan suggests that the ranchers journey to a nearby fort together to explain the situation to Major McKay, but Cook foils this plan by kidnapping Jonathan and persuading the ranchers to return home. When one of the ranchers defies him, Cook has one of his men stab him and places Jonathan's scalpel near the body. Later, while he is being held captive at Cook's ranch, Jonathan performs an operation on Cook, saving his life. As soon as Jonathan is released, the townspeople brand him a murderer and try to hang him. Jonathan escapes and tells Red Cloud that he has seen a stolen Sioux horse at Cook's ranch. After Red Cloud agrees to help clear Jonathan of the murder charge, Cook discovers the doctor's plan and gets rid of the horse. Joan informs Red Cloud of this, but the chief accuses her of setting up the theft of the tribe's horses. The chief takes Joan and Jonathan to an Indian council, where Stand Watie, a Cherokee Confederate general, tries to convince Sioux, Oglala, Nez Perce, Cheyenne, Crow and Blackfoot leaders to join the Southern forces. As he is white, Jonathan is allowed to speak only after surviving a bludgeoning by a group of braves, and he expounds upon the Northern belief that no one is inferior because of skin color. Meanwhile, Cook and his men raid the remaining Sioux herd, killing a child in the process. Horrified, Red Cloud accuses Jonathan of treachery and sends his men to drive away the horse thieves. Hoping for assistance, Cook tells the fort that the Indians have raided a herd of horses that he purchased. After Joan and Jonathan escape from the Sioux village, Jonathan finds Cook and defeats him in a fistfight. Jonathan finally convinces McKay of Cook's guilt, after which the major promises Red Cloud that the Cavalry will punish the murderers and pay for the horses. Satisfied, Red Cloud agrees to maintain the peace. Later, Jonathan enlists in the Union army and promises to marry Joan upon his return. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.