Fort Osage (1952)

72 mins | Western | 10 February 1952

Director:

Lesley Selander

Producer:

Walter Mirisch

Cinematographer:

Harry Neumann

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to Jul 1951 HR news items, some scenes were shot on location in Idyllwild, CA and at the Placerita Ranch in Newhall, CA. Modern sources add Ray Jones to the ... More Less

According to Jul 1951 HR news items, some scenes were shot on location in Idyllwild, CA and at the Placerita Ranch in Newhall, CA. Modern sources add Ray Jones to the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 Jan 1952.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1952
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
19 Jan 1952
p. 11.
Hollywood Citizen-News
12 Jan 1952.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jul 1951
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 1951
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1951
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1951
p. 7, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 1952
p. 4.
Los Angeles Daily News
15 Feb 1952.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Feb 1952.
---
Motion Picture Daily
18 Jan 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Jan 1952
p. 1215.
The Exhibitor
27 Feb 1952
p. 3246.
Variety
23 Jan 1952
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Set cont
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
Col consultant
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 February 1952
Production Date:
9 July--21 July 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1460
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Cinecolor
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in feet):
6,481
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15469
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Fort Osage, Missouri, gateway to the gold mines of California, is situated on the eastern edge of Osage Indian territory. Travelers from all over America stop in Fort Osage to prepare for the last leg of the overland journey west. Businessman Arthur Pickett and his partner, George Keane, provide emigrants with wagons, supplies, guides and armed guards, but their prices are unfairly high, and they often force delays in wagon train departures to enhance the profits of similarly greedy local shop owners. Pickett and Keane, whose Missouri Transit Company once gave the Osage Indians supplies in exchange for passage through Osage territory, decide in their greed to discontinue these supply shipments, believing that most of the tribe has settled in Oklahoma. When one family, unable to afford the high prices of Fort Osage, enters the territory alone, the angry Indians burn their wagon and kill them all. Tom Clay, who is on his way to Fort Osage to guide a Pickett wagon train that has been delayed for seven weeks, sees the attack and warns his employers that the Osage are on the warpath. Pickett, however, insists on sending out the wagon train. Furious that Pickett would charge high prices and then allow the emigrants to face certain death, Tom resigns. Keane sends a gunman to kill Tom, and although the plan goes awry, Tom is unable to discover who hired the killer. The smooth-talking Pickett, meanwhile, convinces his customers that the danger of Indian attack is minimal, and in their anxiety to reach California, they agree to continue the trip with a new wagon master. At the town dance, Tom tells ... +


Fort Osage, Missouri, gateway to the gold mines of California, is situated on the eastern edge of Osage Indian territory. Travelers from all over America stop in Fort Osage to prepare for the last leg of the overland journey west. Businessman Arthur Pickett and his partner, George Keane, provide emigrants with wagons, supplies, guides and armed guards, but their prices are unfairly high, and they often force delays in wagon train departures to enhance the profits of similarly greedy local shop owners. Pickett and Keane, whose Missouri Transit Company once gave the Osage Indians supplies in exchange for passage through Osage territory, decide in their greed to discontinue these supply shipments, believing that most of the tribe has settled in Oklahoma. When one family, unable to afford the high prices of Fort Osage, enters the territory alone, the angry Indians burn their wagon and kill them all. Tom Clay, who is on his way to Fort Osage to guide a Pickett wagon train that has been delayed for seven weeks, sees the attack and warns his employers that the Osage are on the warpath. Pickett, however, insists on sending out the wagon train. Furious that Pickett would charge high prices and then allow the emigrants to face certain death, Tom resigns. Keane sends a gunman to kill Tom, and although the plan goes awry, Tom is unable to discover who hired the killer. The smooth-talking Pickett, meanwhile, convinces his customers that the danger of Indian attack is minimal, and in their anxiety to reach California, they agree to continue the trip with a new wagon master. At the town dance, Tom tells Pickett's pretty daughter Ann that the Indians are decent and civilized people, and must have a reason for breaking the agreement. Later he kisses her. Impressed with Tom's integrity, Ann asks her father to meet with him. Tom offers to visit the Osage village and question the chief directly. Fearing that Tom will discover the cause of the tribe's anger, Keane sends several men to kill him on the way to the village, but Tom manages to escape. The chief tells Tom that when a party of braves went to meet the promised supply shipment, the men were brutally murdered. Tom, horrified and ashamed, vows that the treaty will be honored and that he, himself, will bring the supplies to the tribe. Meanwhile, Keane, who still believes that the Osage pose no threat, decides to frighten them into submission by attacking the village. He and his men descend upon the unsuspecting Indians, killing many of them. One of the men escapes and rides to another Osage village for help. Unaware of this attack, Tom returns to Fort Osage and persuades Pickett to tell the truth about the Indian supply shipments. Tom organizes a party of emigrants to accompany the supply wagons to the village while Pickett, having offered to purchase the supplies himself, counts out the cash. When Keane realizes that Pickett has had a change of heart, he shoots his partner and knocks Ann unconscious. He and his men then steal the money and set out for California. Tom enters Pickett's office just as Ann is regaining consciousness, and soon afterward, they and the townspeople ride out in pursuit of Keane. The avenging Indians see Keane's gang from a distance but decide to attack Fort Osage instead. Soon they encounter Tom's party, and as they confiscate all the weapons, Tom tries to persuade the chief to join him in apprehending Keane. Because Tom is known and respected by the Osage, they agree to accompany him but hold Ann and the townspeople as hostages. Tom and the Osage soon overtake Keane's men, and a furious gun battle ensues. Most of Keane's henchmen are killed, and when Keane tries to escape, Tom leaps on him, and the two men fight. Tom finally kills Keane, and afterward shakes hands with the Osage chief. Back in town, Tom organizes the supply shipment and then, with Ann's help, guides the wagon train out of Fort Osage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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