Rose of Cimarron (1952)

74 mins | Western | January 1952

Director:

Harry Keller

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Arthur Roberts

Production Designer:

Boris Leven

Production Company:

Alco Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Although most sources list this film's production company as Edward L. Alperson Productions, Inc., the copyright registration gives it as Alco Pictures Corp., another Alperson-owned company. A Jul 1951 HR news item includes Paul Hurst in the cast, but he was not seen in the viewed print. A modern source adds Frank Ferguson to the cast, but he also was not seen in the viewed print. Mala Powers and Jack Buetel were borrowed from Howard Hughes, who had them under personal contract, for the picture. HR production charts indicate that exteriors were shot in Topanga Canyon, near Los ... More Less

Although most sources list this film's production company as Edward L. Alperson Productions, Inc., the copyright registration gives it as Alco Pictures Corp., another Alperson-owned company. A Jul 1951 HR news item includes Paul Hurst in the cast, but he was not seen in the viewed print. A modern source adds Frank Ferguson to the cast, but he also was not seen in the viewed print. Mala Powers and Jack Buetel were borrowed from Howard Hughes, who had them under personal contract, for the picture. HR production charts indicate that exteriors were shot in Topanga Canyon, near Los Angeles. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Mar 52
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Mar 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Mar 52
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 51
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 51
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Mar 52
p. 1262.
Variety
12 Mar 52
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Edward L. Alperson Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward des
Women's ward
Men's ward
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec asst
Scr supv
Prod mgr
STAND INS
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stand-in for Mala Powers
Utility stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
Col consultant
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1952
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 January 1952
Production Date:
17 July--13 August 1951 at Republic Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 March 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1703
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Natural Color
Lenses/Prints
Product of the Cinecolor Corp.
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,577
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15476
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After a wagon train traveling through Oklahoma is attacked by Comanche Indians, a young Cherokee named Willie Whitewater surveys the remains of the devastated train and finds a fair-skinned baby girl hidden in a trunk. He takes the infant to his parents, who name her "Rose of Cimarron" and rear her as they would their own Indian child. Years later, Rose's foster parents are murdered while trying to stop outlaws George Newcomb, Clem Dawley and Mike Finch from stealing their horses. When Rose discovers this, she vows revenge and goes in search of the three missing horses--a skewbald, a palomino and a sorrel. Rose's search takes her to Dodge City, where she seeks the aid of Marshal Hollister, known as one of the best lawmen in the West. Despite Hollister's attempt to persuade Rose that she must abide by the white man's law, which requires a fair trial before punishment can be meted out, she demands that the three outlaws be hanged immediately upon capture. Hollister and Rose soon fall in love, and Hollister promises repeatedly that he will bring the outlaws to justice. However, when Rose finds Dawley and Finch, she takes matters into her own hands and kills them in a gun battle. Hollister imprisons Rose and places her in a jail cell adjacent to Deacon, one of Newcomb's men. Soon after, Newcomb and one of his gunslingers, Rio, break Deacon out of jail, and Newcomb, who is attracted to Rose, frees her also. Newcomb realizes that he will have to murder Rose, however, due to her vendetta against her parents' killers, and arranges to have Dawley's younger brother, Jeb, ambush ... +


After a wagon train traveling through Oklahoma is attacked by Comanche Indians, a young Cherokee named Willie Whitewater surveys the remains of the devastated train and finds a fair-skinned baby girl hidden in a trunk. He takes the infant to his parents, who name her "Rose of Cimarron" and rear her as they would their own Indian child. Years later, Rose's foster parents are murdered while trying to stop outlaws George Newcomb, Clem Dawley and Mike Finch from stealing their horses. When Rose discovers this, she vows revenge and goes in search of the three missing horses--a skewbald, a palomino and a sorrel. Rose's search takes her to Dodge City, where she seeks the aid of Marshal Hollister, known as one of the best lawmen in the West. Despite Hollister's attempt to persuade Rose that she must abide by the white man's law, which requires a fair trial before punishment can be meted out, she demands that the three outlaws be hanged immediately upon capture. Hollister and Rose soon fall in love, and Hollister promises repeatedly that he will bring the outlaws to justice. However, when Rose finds Dawley and Finch, she takes matters into her own hands and kills them in a gun battle. Hollister imprisons Rose and places her in a jail cell adjacent to Deacon, one of Newcomb's men. Soon after, Newcomb and one of his gunslingers, Rio, break Deacon out of jail, and Newcomb, who is attracted to Rose, frees her also. Newcomb realizes that he will have to murder Rose, however, due to her vendetta against her parents' killers, and arranges to have Dawley's younger brother, Jeb, ambush her. Jeb's attempts to shoot Rose fail, although Newcomb manages to convince her that Jeb, whom he shoots in the back, was the third man involved in the murders of Red Fawn and Lone Eagle. Meanwhile, back at Dodge City, Hollister realizes that his only hope of tracking down the outlaws is through Rose, and he attempts to lure her back by placing Willie under arrest on trumped-up charges. When Rose returns to Dodge City, she discovers that a $1,000 bounty has been placed on her head, and that Hollister is planning to transport Willie to a federal prison on the same eastbound train that the Newcomb gang is planning to rob. As the train speeds along, nearing a stretch of track that has been destroyed by the Newcomb gang, Rose, on horseback, manages to overtake it and climb on board. Once on the train, Rose pulls the emergency cord, thus preventing a train wreck. No sooner does the train come to a halt, however, than the outlaws begin looting the train's gold cargo. A blistering gun battle ensues, during which Deacon is seriously wounded, and Rose and Willie escape. As the outlaws flee, they bury the gold near a group of trees, then split up, with Rose and Willie taking Deacon. Newcomb circles around to get the gold and is confronted by Rio, who was also attempting to claim the loot. Newcomb shoots Rio, then joins Rose and Willie at a ranch hideout. There, Rose discovers, through Deacon's deathbed confession, that Newcomb is one of the men who killed her Indian foster parents. Hollister arrives, and although Newcomb makes an attempt to flee, Rose and Hollister catch up with him, and Hollister kills him. Satisfied with the demise of the Newcomb gang, Rose and Hollister ride off together to begin life anew. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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